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Pentax MX

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49 161,563 Thu June 15, 2017
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98% of reviewers $142.75 9.23
Pentax MX

Pentax MX
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Pentax MX
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Pentax MX
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Pentax MX
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Pentax MX
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Pentax MX
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Description:
The Pentax MX was introduced in 1976 as a pro-caliber all-manual workhorse SLR camera. It was very compact but yet had one of the largest and brightest viewfinders of any SLR. A 250 images film back was available as well as a 5 fps motor drive and a 2 fps winder and numerous other accessories.

The set shutter speed and aperture are visible in the view finder, the latter via a window that projects the aperture value from the aperture ring into the view finder.

Exposure is set by adjusting shutter speed or aperture until a green LED lights up in the viewfinder. This is an electronic version of the match needle metering of the Spotmatic and KM.

MX
Year introduced
1976
Mount
K
Meter range
1 - 19 EV
Meter pattern
c
ISO range
25 - 1600
DX ISO range
No DX coding
Exposure modes
M, B
Exposure compensation
Not applicable
Exposure lock
Not applicable
Shutter speeds (auto)
Not applicable
Shutter speeds (manual)
1 - 1/1000s, B
Shutter speeds (mechanical)
1 - 1/1000s, B
Self timer
Yes
Mirror lock-up
No
Auto bracketing
Not applicable
Multiple exposures
Yes
Winder
External winder 2 fps, motor drive 1-5 fps
Built-in flash
No
TTL flash
No
P-TTL flash
No
Sync speed
1/60s
Flash exposure comp
Not applicable
Autofocus
No
Autofocus sensitivity
Not applicable
Power zoom
No
Viewfinder
0.97x, 95%
Viewfinder type
Pentaprism
Diopter correction
No
Exchangeable screen
Yes
Depth of field preview
Yes
Image size
24 x 36 mm
Panorama format
No
Battery
2 x S76
Battery grip/pack
Yes, for the motor drive
Size (W x H x D)
136 x 82.5 x 49.5 mm
Weight
495 g
Price History:



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Sort Reviews by: Date | Author | Rating | Recommendation | Likes (Descending) Showing Reviews 1-15 of 49
New Member

Registered: December, 2012
Posts: 4
Review Date: June 15, 2017 I can recommend the Pentax MX: Yes | Price: $50.00 | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: The feeling of using a precision piece of equipment
Cons: None

I've just taken delivery of a Pentax MX bought from ebay. I bought one in 1979 to replace my K1000- it was the traffic lights in the viewfinder that tempted me, plus the extra features that Pentax thoughtfully included, such as the aperture readout, depth of field lever and the holder on the back so you knew what sort of film you'd loaded into it. I really was the best-handling camera I've ever used before or since, especially with the motorised winder attached- very useful when used with longer lenses or a Vivitar 283 with bounce card on the top. I don't remember the shutter speed dial being difficult to move, but the model I just bought seems a little stiff. However, using it in 'shutter priority' sidesteps this issue. By far the most appealing feature is the feeling of quality and precision in the mechanics- I haven't put a roll of film in yet but I pick up the camera every now and again and fire the shutter a few times as it's so satisfying. It's this 'feel' that has kept me using Pentax ever since, though with the advent of polycarbonate bodies in later years, this was somewhat diminished. I mostly shot on slide film, which was fairly unforgiving as regards exposure but there were very few shots that weren't usable.
I bought the ebay MX intending to merely have it on display, but since I've rediscovered how good it feels to use, I may well give my K5 a rest and start actually shooting some film!
   
Pentaxian

Registered: April, 2009
Location: Madrid, Spain
Posts: 4,150
Review Date: March 5, 2017 I can recommend the Pentax MX: Yes | Price: $65.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Small, quite solid, amazing viewfinder
Cons: 1/1000s max shutter speed, uneven film advance, stiff shutter speed dial

This was the first film camera I bought when I started to get interested in film, having used a digital K200D for a few years.

It's very small, fairly light but solidly built and pleasant to use. The small size is useful is compactness is required but I prefer larger cameras in the hand - the K series or a Minolta SRT-101, which are also more solidly built. For a small SLR it still feels quite good in the hand.

The fully manual exposure with LEDs in the viewfinder is a good system that works well and is ideal for learning exposure and allowing the user to make adjustments without the complications of EV comp or exposure memory. I like that all the shutter speeds are mechanical so the camera can be used without a battery.

The best thing about this camera is without a doubt the viewfinder. It's HUGE. Coming from an APS-C DSLR it's a revelation being able to see everything so clearly and adjust focus quickly and perfectly. The viewfinder is the reason that this camera has become my film camera for low light - for the last few years it's only been used with Tri-X at 1600.

There are some annoying things about this camera. Most important among them is the 1/1000s maximum shutter speed. Pentax always lagged behind the leaders in terms of providing fast maximum shutter speeds but 1/1000s is too slow for a camera that claims to be a pro model, even in 1976. Most other Pentax film SLRs before and since suffer from the same problem.

The shutter speed selection dial is stiff and takes a lot of effort to move, making quick adjustments to exposure possible only by changing aperture, not speed. The wind-on action works fine but it's not smooth - the resistance is uneven through the stroke, and that gives the impression of imprecise engineering inside. I haven't experienced that with any other film cameras of any brand.

Many of the negatives don't affect what the camera can do, but they reduce the user experience of shooting with the MX, and user experience is one of the main reasons I started shooting film - I just love these old cameras and lenses. Still, you can't ignore that the MX is a capable camera and building something so reliable with such a great viewfinder in a package as small as this is a considerable feat.

I enjoy using my MX, but I have many other cameras that on the whole I enjoy using more - the KX, K2DMD, Minolta SRT-101 - even without that fantastic viewfinder.

Some photos taken with my MX, not that they indicate anything about the quality of the camera, I just feel that all reviews should be accompanied by photos


London (Fuji Pro 400H) 035a
by Jonathan MacDonald, on Flickr


85070025 (straightened)
by Jonathan MacDonald, on Flickr


MX, Tri-X 1600 002
by Jonathan MacDonald, on Flickr
   
Junior Member

Registered: June, 2015
Location: Százhalombatta, Hungary
Posts: 32

1 user found this helpful
Review Date: March 2, 2017 I can recommend the Pentax MX: Yes | Price: $46.00 | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: Massive body, HUGE viewfinder, easy to use light meter
Cons: Maybe a little-bit too small, if I'm nitpicky

I got this camera recently as my second camera and as my first film SRL ever. My other camera being a K10D, I got really used to APS-C sized sensors so looking through the viewfinder of the MX was a great "Wow!", especially after realizing, that I now have a great camera for both street and landscape photography. (as the APS-C K10D is more suited for wildlife)
6 out of my 7 lenses being vintage ones, I didn't have to get any new lens. Still, all of them lenses came to new life on a "full-frame" body. My previously "normal" 28mm f3.5 suddenly became a fine landscape lens. My two fifties, which were portrait glass, all of a sudden became fine normals, my two teles became wider... both the 135 and the 75-210. My Tokina 28-70 also became a very normal kit lens.

The MX feels very-very massive, as well as really nice to handle. The viewfinder is large and bright, the split screen is very high quality, compared to the one I put in my K10D and it's really useful. There's a nice self timer, for those tripod shots, where you'd rather not touch the exposure button yourself, keeping vibrations to a minimum.

It has got a nice weight to it, but it's not too heavy. I got used to holding my K10D by the grip... now that's something I'd rather not do with the MX, especially with a telephoto lens. The camera body itself is small. So small actually, that it is considered one of the smallest SLR bodies ever made. That's a really nice feature actually, so I'd rather not put a winder on it.

Everyone seems to hail the K1000, but that's an amateur camera. The MX is a pro level SLR and is every bit as good, plus better than the K1000... still, the demand is perhaps less for the MX, it being less famous. And that's a nice point for those, who recognize how fine of a camera this is. Mine was rather cheap, 13500 HUF, which is about $46. It came in mint condition, with new batteries, a strap and the original leather case.

   
New Member

Registered: June, 2016
Posts: 1
Review Date: November 28, 2016 I can recommend the Pentax MX: Yes | Price: $75.00 | Rating: 8 

 
Pros: Size weight viewfinder
Cons: no MLU

I've had 2 MX cameras over the years. The first I owned from 2007 to 2010. When I PX'd it for other camera gear. I purchased my second one about 18 months ago as I was missing the small size of this model and wanted something similar to my ME Super. The MX is a well built camera with good handling, excellent viewfinder in a compact form. Its ideal for travel both because of its size and also because its fully mechanical and robust. They are still very reasonably priced. I only use mine with a 50mm f1.7, 40mm f2.8 or 35mm f2.8 lens to keep the package as compact and balanced as possible. For heavier and/or longer lenses I prefer to use my KM or KX cameras. The only thing I miss on the camera is the lack of MLU. I've never managed the trick you are supposed to be able to do to get MLU on mine. Anyway as I have a KX I don't lose any sleep over this omission. I do find that the shutter release benefits from the addition of a soft release button. Other reviews have mentioned the very stiff shutter speed dial. Indeed my first MX had this feature, however my current one does not, it being comparable to many mechanical dials on my other cameras.
So to sum up, the MX is a very capable, reliable machine which is enjoyable to use, light enough to carry around all day and gives excellent results.
   
New Member

Registered: October, 2016
Location: Porthtowan
Posts: 17
Review Date: October 24, 2016 I can recommend the Pentax MX: Yes | Price: $230.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: The diminutive size, ease of use, robustness, doen't require batteries
Cons: Needs a spacer disc for a tripod, slow flash sync

I auditioned this against the Minolta XD-7, Olympus OM-1n and the Nikon FM. The MX beat the Nikon and Minolta on price and the OM-1n in every other aspect, especially handling. Being designed for manual exposure mode only it made that as easy as possible. When fitted with the 40mm f2.8 it was a compact camera that easily fitted in a jacket pocket. The light meter was as good as any of the era but the readout somewhat better than most. Having said that, one afternoon in the Peak District the batteries gave out and I had to rely on the guidelines printed on the Kodachrome 64 film box... the exposures were spot on! The small size and light weight made it a breeze to use with long telephoto lenses too. I swapped the standard focussing screen for a gridded version, which proved better for landscapes and architectural shots.

Areas where I feel it could have been improved; a metal bladed vertical shutter like the Nikon's would have given it a faster sync speed. The tripod spacer was very inconvenient - I was paranoid about losing it! I would have preferred a broader shutter speed dial with a concentric shutter button as used on the Minolta or the Chinon CE-4/5.
   
Loyal Site Supporter

Registered: March, 2015
Posts: 5,602
Review Date: March 14, 2016 I can recommend the Pentax MX: Yes | Price: $75.00 | Rating: 8 

 
Pros: Small size, battery-independent where necessary
Cons: Max 1/1000 shutter speed

I bought it to see what the fuss was all about and I quite like it. The review is written in the context of this being a film-era camera bought in the digital era, so very much a "fun" thing and not purchased with the idea of assembling its system of accessories around it.

Compared with the Spotmatic/K series +/- needle metering system, the LED system in this camera has its ups and downs. In low light or against darker backgrounds it is brilliant - you can immediately see under, over, or "on", where seeing the needle could be difficult. In bright light or against a snowy or glarey background, however, I find it difficult to see the LEDs - this may, however, be because they have faded with age; and it could somewhat cynically be argued that if it's so bright you can't see the LEDs, you might as well just set f/22 and 1/1000 anyway. The HUGE viewfinder is wonderful for composing, but sometimes I find myself having to turn my eye a bit far to the side to see the LEDS or the shutter speed (which, like the aperture, is also visible in the viewfinder).

My MX came with the standard focusing screen (central horizontal split prism with surrounding microprism "doughnut"). I haven't handled any of the others.

DOF preview is handled ingeniously, by pushing the self-timer lever TOWARDS the lens mount, thus avoiding the need for a separate button. It's in a very handy place, and the index finger falls easily to the task, but some may prefer a separate button. I have no problem with this method.

I find this camera far more useful for "deliberate" shots, where I have time to meter and shoot carefully, than for rapid action (my kids at play, etc). For the latter, the ME (which I also own) or one of its descendants is possibly the better deal. The "notorious" stiff shutter speed dial is also more conducive to deliberate shooting. From time to time I have put a stepless M42 lens (Industar 50/3.5) on it and effectively used it in shutter priority mode; select the speed, focus, turn the aperture to match, shoot.

The size is a real bonus for me - yes, my pinkie and sometimes my fourth finger hang off the edge, but on the other hand I have a few outdoor jackets with pockets big enough to take it with a 40mm M-series Pancake lens on it. I accept that some people find it far too small to use comfortably, but I'm not one of them.

As with the ME, which I have also reviewed, I find this camera works best out-of-the-box with smaller and lighter primes. The biggest lens I've put on it is the 80-200 f/4.5 M lens, and it's quite a handful. Those who possess one of the winders get an enlarged grip which probably improves the ergonomics a great deal. Still, I bought it for its compactness and portability - with a cross-shoulder strap screwed into the tripod mount it can hang conveniently at the user's side, even under a jacket, almost forgotten until needed (and for this a shorter lens is definitely recommended). It is only very slightly larger than the ME when placed side-by-side, not enough to make any real difference for most people, but it's an ever so slightly more awkward draw out of the pocket than the ME.

For the sort of shooting I do with film cameras, I find the ME more useful on many occasions. But this is a fun camera to use, and the knowledge that it will still shoot on Sunny SIxteen rules even when the batteries are dead and the electronics and LEDs have given up the ghost is comforting.

I've deducted points for the difficulty with the metering LEDs in bright light and the need to take my eye a little off the ball to see shutter speed and aperture.
   
Veteran Member

Registered: August, 2011
Location: Austin, Texas
Posts: 302
Review Date: March 9, 2016 I can recommend the Pentax MX: Yes | Price: $110.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Size, build, simplicity, ease of use
Cons: Can feel too small without Winder

This is my second MX. I purchased the first one near 30 years ago and should never have sold it after I got my first auto-focus body. That first MX was my third Pentax body (after 2 Spotmatics and a KX ). Luckily I have kept the 5 SMC-A primes that I still use on my K-3 (24, 35, 50, 105, 135). I was lucky to find this one with a winder, which is a must have accessory. It needed new foam seals (normal) and after replacing them I have enjoyed running 3 rolls through with great results. I love that it is all mechanical and will operate without batteries, just like my KX. Not having automatic settings is no big deal. For low light metering I just pull out my Luna-Pro.
   
Pentaxian

Registered: November, 2013
Location: North Bohemia
Posts: 1,102
Review Date: January 5, 2016 I can recommend the Pentax MX: Yes | Price: None indicated | Rating: 8 

 
Pros: Size, feel, finder, easiness of operation, dof preview
Cons: stiffer speed dial, just 1/1000 and meter just to ISO 1600, handling with heavy lenses

After several rolls of film I can say it's much better experience than Praktica MTL 3 M42 SLR but even it has got the job done yet not as smooth as the MX - open aperture metering is nice

I think everything was said. If you want a cute film manual K mount SLR for a rare shoot and can find it for a good price you may consider it.

MX vs MTL3







Scanned shot with kit M50/1,7



   
Junior Member

Registered: March, 2014
Posts: 27
Review Date: September 29, 2015 I can recommend the Pentax MX: No | Price: $70.00 | Rating: 5 

 
Pros: large viewfinder image, mechanical shutter
Cons: too small & lightweight, stiff shutterspeed dial, easily dents

The MX looks great, but I prefer to use the KX and even ME (electronic twin-sister, same size viewfinder!) over this one for the following reasons;

-Shutterspeed dial too stiff
I simply don't understand why the shutterspeed selector needs to be THIS stiff, especially on such a small and completely manual body. It should be turning easier. It is one of the few controls so it is a major negative.

-Too small and lightweight
The top plate is made so thin that it dents as easy as a peugeot 206, if you know what I mean. I don't consider it very robust, it is quite the opposite of the older Spotmatics. I like to hold something a bit bigger when using an all manual camera, and have some more weight to prevent for camera shake.

It can be a nice camera if you have one in good condition and take care of it, and don't mind about the shutter dial that much. Half of the MX bodies I encountered while searching for a good one had problems though; with the light meter, transportation or the shutter dial.

I don't think the MX is not a good camera, however I do think that it is very overrated and do not recommend it. If you don't have any mechanical analog Pentax body yet, I recommend to look for the KM or KX instead. If you like the size and weight of the MX, I recommend the ME (super).
   
New Member

Registered: September, 2015
Location: Devon
Posts: 12

2 users found this helpful
Review Date: September 22, 2015 I can recommend the Pentax MX: Yes | Price: None indicated | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: Excellent build quality and performance
Cons: You have to get the film developed

I bought mine in 1978 with a 50mm 1.7 SMC lens to replace a K1000 which was stolen. Plus points over the K1000 are the dofp, self timer and if it suits you the compact size.

It is an excellent fully manual SLR, easy to use (even if your battery dies which is an usual event as they last a very long time), totally reliable and built like a tank. Focusing, aperture and shutter speed selection are all done automatically for you these days but doing all of these yourself on an MX is simple and quick and means you learn a lot about the important aspects of photography. You get so used to doing it you pretty much know what to set before you even look through the viewfinder. I see some have mentioned camera shake but I've found it fine hand held down to 1/60s.

Third party K bayonet lenses may not provide the aperture reading in the viewfinder as the aperture control ring doesn't line up but that's not the camera's fault.

I still use it and I doubt anyone will be saying that about a DSLR nearly 40 years after they bought it.
   
Senior Member

Registered: October, 2011
Location: British Columbia
Posts: 166
Review Date: April 6, 2015 I can recommend the Pentax MX: Yes | Price: $125.00 | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: Build Quality, Meter, Periscope, Viewfinder, DOF Preview, Self Timer, Swappable focusing screens, Accepts Winders
Cons: 1/1000 only, 1600 max iso, Slow Sync

There's not much more to say that hasn't already been said.

What I like:

1) The build quality is second to none. I can't imagine anyone complaining about the build of the body.
2) Not only have I found the meter accurate in low light, the yellow LED over/Underexposure lights help verifying correct exposure in half stops.
3) The periscope reads out aperture info into the viewfinder.
4) The viewfinder is massive and has very good coverage.
5) DOF preview is a handy addition to have.
6) The Self Timer is another nice to have feature for me.
7) The fact that the focusing screen can be replaced with other screens is awesome. My MX had quite a dusty screen when I first bought it second hand. Popping it out and giving a few blasts of air with a rocket blower keeps it looking brand new. I also replaced the original split prism focusing-aid screen with a matte screen from a broken PZ-1. (I prefer to focus and shoot, rather than focus, recompose, and shoot). With its giant viewfinder, manual focusing is a fairly simple affair.
8) Some might argue that the camera is too small. However, this camera accepts an auto-winder which gives it more size and a large ergonomic grip.


The things I don't like:
1) The shutter maxes out at 1/1000 of a second. It's alright, but there are K mount cameras with better shutter speeds around for less money. (Chinon CE-4s, Chinon CE-5, Ricoh XR-p, etc). Since my MX continues to keep on shooting after several years of continuous use, while both my Ricoh and Chinon bodies have bit the dust, I ultimately have to admit that the MX was a better value for the money.
2) The ISO dial maxes out at 1600. It's not a show stopper, but films like Ilford Delta 3200 or other black and white films pushed to 3200 will have to be compensated for by memory when one uses this camera.
3) a flash sync speed of 1/60 is really rather slow. I like shooting indoors with bounce flash at relatively wide apertures. I find I tend to need to stop down and increase flash output in order not to have mixed incandescent/flash lighting since the shutter stays open so long.

In the end I rate this camera a 10/10. Each of the things I dislike about this camera are corrected in later film models, although most of them are auto focus bodies with their own disadvantages. I shoot an MX in low light and a PZ-1/Z1-P for my daily shooter. Choice is great; and, for the money, we can choose both!
   
Site Supporter

Registered: March, 2014
Posts: 37

3 users found this helpful
Review Date: December 22, 2014 I can recommend the Pentax MX: Yes | Price: None indicated | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: small, build quality
Cons: none from my standpoint

As a freelance pro when younger, I used a Nikon F3. Great camera. However, my work style usually demanded medium format, and I bought a Pentax 645 when it came out, to supplement my Mamiya C330, which produced fine results but is a bit of an unwieldy beast in the field. When I compared the size of my Nikon F3 with motor drive to the Pentax 645, (the Nikon was larger, weighed more, yadayadayada) and compared the results with fashion, wedding and portrait work, I sold the F3 and bought an MX with the same system of lenses. I was delighted with the size and weight saving in my packs.

At that time, the only reason I could see to even use a 35mm in my work was as a backup in the field, and I had no reason to own a 35mm that was bulkier than the sleek and ergonomic 645. Later on I bought an Olympus OM1 on a whim, and used it and the MX as my using 35mm cameras. I got the Oly from a friend, and it had the 21mm Zuiko f3.5 lens on it. Loved the lens so kept the camera. Still have it.

I still use them as my 35mm cameras of choice, along with the diminutive Olympus Pen FT half-frame, which was the first 35mm camera I bought (in grade 10 in hight school).

I kept my MX and the 7 lenses I owned for it, and when I went digital, I went Pentax because of the backwards compatability. I still have my Pen FT and another body, still have my Oly OM1 and the 21, but I own 5 MXs. That should tell you what I think of the camera.

It's simple, reliable, completely unquirky, and a handsome little brute to boot. I've never had a failure with my MXs in the field. I still do all of my black and white work in film, so I usually have 2 MX bodies with me, loaded with HP5 and FP4, with a 50mm f1.4 Pentax-M on one body, and a 100mm f2.8 on the other, with a 17mm Tamron, 90mm Tamron macro, and 35-70mm Pentax-M f2.8-3.5 in my kit. I use them all interchangeably on either the MX or K10 digital bodies, and if I'm travelling, add the 200mm Pentax-M f4 and the 75-300mm Tamron as well. My digital arsenal is the 10-20mm Sigma, the 35mm Pentax Macro limited, and the 77mm f1.8 Pentax Macro limited. If I need longer, which is seldom, I take what I need.

Along with a Mamiya C330 and a couple of its lenses, there is really nothing I cannot cover anywhere. Guess you could call me a happy camper.
   
New Member

Registered: March, 2012
Location: Berlin
Posts: 6
Review Date: September 12, 2014 I can recommend the Pentax MX: Yes | Price: $40.00 | Rating: 7 

 
Pros: Compact, elegant design, all manual essentials. Big bright viewfinder.
Cons: shutter shake? wish it had an AV mode...

It's tiny! And it's a lovely looking camera, and pairs perfectly with the compact little M 50/ƒ1.7. A great camera to throw in a bag and travel with.

There really nothing on this camera to get in the way - its a stripped back fully manual camera with depth of field preview, a huge, bright finder and a really clever LED meter in the viewfinder - it's simple and intuitive. It would be a hell of a camera if it has an AV or TV mode on it...

It might be too small! It gets unbalanced pretty quickly with anything longer or larger than a 50mm lens on it and I do believe that camera shake impacts the pictures. I just get more sharp photos from my Spotmatic and my KX.

Here's one taken with my mx and the M50/1.7


   
Site Supporter

Registered: August, 2012
Location: Queensland
Posts: 3,290

2 users found this helpful
Review Date: August 10, 2014 I can recommend the Pentax MX: Yes | Price: $100.00 | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: The perfect robust manual SLR
Cons: None, for it's era

I thought I had already reviewed the MX, since I have had a love affair with it since buying it in 1977. (I now own four, correction, 5 of them, and the price is for the latest body bought).
Since the good qualities of the MX have been well covered, I would like to address my comments to what others see as negative qualities.
1) Too small. This is subjective rather than objective, since it falls easily into my fingers, as if they and camera were designed for each other.
2) Magic finger take up spool. It is different, but not difficult to use. Again this is more subject to personal taste.
3) Speed dial stiff for one finger use. True, it is stiff, but I usually set the speed before composing. Otherwise it is not a big problem lowering the camera to change it.
4) Speed limited to 1000 sec. Again true, but that was the standard of the time when 400 ASA was quite new on the market. So choose an appropriate film speed.
5) Light meter hard to read in bright light conditions. That may be so, but I did not find this a problem. Besides, it was easy to read in poor light, and half-stop accurate.
6) No mirror lock-up. My understanding (correct me if I am wrong) is that Pentax considered the MX didn't need it due to the design of vibration damping. In any event, with a 50mm lens, I considered 1/15 second hand held as a usable option and even 1/8 possible.

I have all the K (and Spotmatic) versions, and love them all. My LX is minty and Eric CLA'd, - nothing can match the sensuous feel of it. Yet it is the MX I am most comfortable with in it's simplicity and compactness. It is my ultimate SLR.
   
Forum Member

Registered: December, 2012
Location: Wild-Nord-East Hungary
Posts: 55
Review Date: August 5, 2014 I can recommend the Pentax MX: Yes | Price: $70.00 | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: Precision instrument.
Cons: none

More than 10 years I have used full satisfaction.
Non-automatic machine, not thinking instead of the photographer;
the photographer must be able to think about.
Add Review of Pentax MX



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