Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
10-13-2010, 07:37 PM   #61
Veteran Member
Pentaxor's Avatar

Join Date: May 2009
Location: Vancouver, B.C.
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 6,513
QuoteOriginally posted by JoepLX3 Quote
- At center of the lenses the location won't change much, but the shapes do:

Cropping is not same as zooming, it is real!!!
Digital Photography Tutorial: Focal Length - TrustedReviews - TrustedReviews





You can't call this lens distortion...
- With a UWA you look kind of side ways
- With a tele lens you kind of narrow view and magnify

Portrait lenses (for glamor applications) are typically longer to make people (faces) look slim (and support some distance)
I believe people should know the difference about focal length perspective to that of distortion. the obvious way of looking for distortion are lines that are bent or images that are stretched (e.g. faces, buildings, etc...). I can see why some people call this as an illusion or perhaps the term used as "camera trick". however, this does not mean that it's really an illusion nor your mind paying tricks on you, but rather real. it's only how the lens is made for, not necessarily distortion.

10-13-2010, 08:13 PM - 2 Likes   #62
Loyal Site Supporter
Canada_Rockies's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Sparwood, BC, Canada
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 9,393
QuoteOriginally posted by JoepLX3 Quote
I can understand the "kick" of using graduated filters, doing it optical rather than digital, but am curious if is actually really needed for dynamic range or you just do it for the fun / habit.
The graduated filter does something that cannot be done by a sensor without taking multiple shots and using HDR software to assemble the images. This requires a static subject and a tripod for best results. A sensor has a fixed, limited amount of dynamic range. The graduated filter reduces the dynamic range of the subject as the sensor sees it, eliminating the need to assemble multiple images to reduce the dynamic range to a value that is possible to use.
10-13-2010, 08:40 PM   #63
Veteran Member
rparmar's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2008
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 8,783
I don't think this fact has been mentioned yet, but I chose the DA12-24 not only for the handling and what I concluded to be superior optics (this can be argued forever -- let's not) but because it goes to 24mm, one of my most used focal lengths. I was willing to give up 2mm on the wide end to get 4mm on the normal end. If you prefer "wider the better" then obviously get the Sigma 10-20. Or that 8mm Samyang... which eventually I will add as well for special effects.
10-13-2010, 09:33 PM - 1 Like   #64
Veteran Member




Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 523
QuoteOriginally posted by rparmar Quote
I don't think this fact has been mentioned yet, but I chose the DA12-24 not only for the handling and what I concluded to be superior optics (this can be argued forever -- let's not) but because it goes to 24mm, one of my most used focal lengths. I was willing to give up 2mm on the wide end to get 4mm on the normal end. If you prefer "wider the better" then obviously get the Sigma 10-20. Or that 8mm Samyang... which eventually I will add as well for special effects.
I bought the Tamron 10-24 mm, having both!!!

10-13-2010, 09:37 PM   #65
Veteran Member




Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 523
QuoteOriginally posted by Canada_Rockies Quote
The graduated filter does something that cannot be done by a sensor without taking multiple shots and using HDR software to assemble the images. This requires a static subject and a tripod for best results. A sensor has a fixed, limited amount of dynamic range. The graduated filter reduces the dynamic range of the subject as the sensor sees it, eliminating the need to assemble multiple images to reduce the dynamic range to a value that is possible to use.
Thanks for feedback, sounds like fun to utilize!!!
10-14-2010, 07:30 AM   #66
Veteran Member
rparmar's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2008
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 8,783
QuoteOriginally posted by JoepLX3 Quote
I bought the Tamron 10-24 mm, having both!!!
Never tried that one and now likely never will. A nice solution to the dilemma!
10-14-2010, 07:58 AM   #67
Site Supporter
Biro's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 1,177
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by JoepLX3 Quote
I bought the Tamron 10-24 mm, having both!!!
You asked me about this lens earlier in this string. You know... I was meaning to check it out, despite its getting very mixed reviews. But somehow I never asked once I got involved with the three Sigmas and one Pentax. A possible mistake on my part but I suspect - given my priorities in this purchase - I would have reached the same final decision. Reviews nothwithstanding, you seem to be pleased with the results you're getting, right? But there's a Samyang 8mm fisheye with my name on it somewhere.
10-14-2010, 10:23 AM   #68
Pentaxian




Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Texas
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 3,430
QuoteOriginally posted by Canada_Rockies Quote
The graduated filter does something that cannot be done by a sensor without taking multiple shots and using HDR software to assemble the images. This requires a static subject and a tripod for best results. A sensor has a fixed, limited amount of dynamic range. The graduated filter reduces the dynamic range of the subject as the sensor sees it, eliminating the need to assemble multiple images to reduce the dynamic range to a value that is possible to use.
Thanks. You said it better than I could.

It helps to really bring the sky on par with the landscape. Meter on the ground, the sky is blown out. Meter on the sky and the land is dark. Use a GND and you will achieve much better results.

Honestly, I find it a pain to use sometimes, but it does do the job and does it well. Sometimes, if I am not doing a long exposure, i'll just hold it up to the lens to take the shot.

10-14-2010, 10:28 AM   #69
Veteran Member
Jewelltrail's Avatar

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Rhode Island
Photos: Albums
Posts: 4,180
QuoteQuote:
Canada Rockies: The graduated filter does something that cannot be done by a sensor without taking multiple shots and using HDR software to assemble the images. This requires a static subject and a tripod for best results. A sensor has a fixed, limited amount of dynamic range. The graduated filter reduces the dynamic range of the subject as the sensor sees it, eliminating the need to assemble multiple images to reduce the dynamic range to a value that is possible to use.
Agreed! There is an essential place for the Graduated ND filter in Digital as you explain so well. I find them indispensable at times, especially for avoiding the delicate highlights of landscapes with wonderfully decorated clouds and blue.
10-14-2010, 12:14 PM   #70
Veteran Member
RioRico's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Limbo, California
Posts: 11,264
QuoteOriginally posted by JoepLX3 Quote
I can understand the "kick" of using graduated filters, doing it optical rather than digital, but am curious if is actually really needed for dynamic range or you just do it for the fun / habit.
Yes, they are really needed, if you don't want to be stuck to a tripod. To get a similar effect with HDR software as with a GND filter, you need to stack some tripodded shots. If anything moves, tough -- or you can pretend you're doing Harris Shutter work, but that ain't the same.

Nope, if you want to shoot moving dark subjects under a bright sky, you *need* a GND, at least until silicon foundries produce sensors with region-variable sensitivity. I use a GND out of necessity, not for kicks. For kicks, I snort whipped cream. Doesn't everyone?
10-14-2010, 02:59 PM   #71
Pentaxian




Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Texas
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 3,430
QuoteOriginally posted by Jewelltrail Quote
Agreed! There is an essential place for the Graduated ND filter in Digital as you explain so well. I find them indispensable at times, especially for avoiding the delicate highlights of landscapes with wonderfully decorated clouds and blue.
Example from my first time using it. This was one picture. Not much PP involved. I went too far down with the GND and darkened the tree line a bit. You learn from experience.


I've learned that if you put the GND to where it looks right in the viewfinder, and then move it up about a half inch, you will get nicer results than my exmaple above.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
10mm, k-mount, lens, lenses, lot, money, pentax, pentax lens, range, sigma, slr lens, uwa
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The real world difference f/1.4 -vs- f/2 Oscar1 Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 13 02-06-2010 10:33 PM
DA* and DA Limited, What's the real difference? golfcoachnoel Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 2 12-16-2009 10:38 AM
Snowflakes in the real world MightyMike Post Your Photos! 6 12-23-2008 06:40 AM
CA in the DA*16-50 vs Tamron 28-75 in real world 123K10D Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 10 02-23-2008 02:44 PM
Real world use. Rob.K Pentax DSLR Discussion 29 02-12-2007 01:26 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:37 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top