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10-22-2007, 04:57 PM   #1
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what would a typical setting be for football shots

My 15 yr old plays football (he is the kicker) and I want to try out my new camera (K100D Super) and use the 70-300mm f/4-5.6 APO DG Macro Lens. (I have no idea what all those letters mean). When I am sitting in the stands (under the Friday night lights), what type of settings should I try? I usually sit on the 50 yd line about 50-75 yds from where he kicks off. Also, if I moved down out of the stands to the fence along the sidelines (putting me really close to the edge of the field) and around the 30-40 yd line, what type of settings would I use. Could you give me a few settings to try for each situation so I can play around with them at his next game? Keep in mind I have no idea what each mm and f stop means ( I am seriously new at the slr stuff!) Any help at all would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

10-22-2007, 05:16 PM   #2
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Sorry, that information is top secret.

Consider this: The light is poor; this usually requires a wide-open aperture. Hence the suggestion that you acquire some form of fast zoom with a constant f/2.8 maximum aperture.

Most athletes can run in the range of 10-25 mph. The closer they are to you and your camera, the faster that is going to seem. Obviously, this effect will be more pronounced when they run past rather than run away or towards you. An a diagonal path it will fall somewhere in between.

So, wide open aperture and the fastest shutter speed that still gives a satisfactory exposure.


QuoteOriginally posted by momof4 Quote
My 15 yr old plays football (he is the kicker) and I want to try out my new camera (K100D Super) and use the 70-300mm f/4-5.6 APO DG Macro Lens. (I have no idea what all those letters mean). When I am sitting in the stands (under the Friday night lights), what type of settings should I try? I usually sit on the 50 yd line about 50-75 yds from where he kicks off. Also, if I moved down out of the stands to the fence along the sidelines (putting me really close to the edge of the field) and around the 30-40 yd line, what type of settings would I use. Could you give me a few settings to try for each situation so I can play around with them at his next game? Keep in mind I have no idea what each mm and f stop means ( I am seriously new at the slr stuff!) Any help at all would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
10-22-2007, 05:28 PM   #3
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My smart ass answer after reading the title only is "go to the footbal field" (setting). Actually the advice above is correct. you need the fastest lens you can get as night games have tough lighting. Another tip is to turn up the ISO. This camera is very good at higher ISO settings and you might even want to shoot at 1600. That will increase the shutter speeds you'll have to work with and be abe to freeze the action better.

have a look at this:

How to Photograph Football
10-22-2007, 05:30 PM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by jfdavis58 Quote
So, wide open aperture and the fastest shutter speed that still gives a satisfactory exposure.
And just in case you don't know what that means either - set the camera to Av mode - set the aperture value to its widest (which is 4.0 if you are zoomed right out, or 5.6 if you are zoomed right in). This will then give you the fastest shutter speed possible.

Might help to try setting the ISO value to 800, 1600 or 3200 and see if the results are acceptable to you. By going to a higher ISO you will get faster shutter speeds.

10-22-2007, 05:54 PM   #5
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Thanks ARPE----wide open, shutter speed, aperature----all are a foreign language to me! I do understand the ISO, though! Where about are you located in New Zealand? My daughter was born there 11 years ago while our family was there on work/visitors permits. We haven't been there for 10 years. She was born in Takapuna/Auckland. We lived in Devonport for 2 years and really loved it. The people we met were wonderful and the scenery is amazing!
10-23-2007, 11:34 AM   #6
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Football

IMO, the key is high ISO (1600 set with Fn button), set ap. at widest level, and PRE Focus to a spot for the upcoming shot if you can once zoom is set. Try to use a mono pod to reduce shake and turn on anti shake (K10D if you have it). Also try to go down for a night test if they are doing anything on the field (band, drill team, etc.)during the week before the game. Call the school and they will let you know. Point is different stadiums use different lights (mercury, sodium, etc.) and you want to experiment with different settings before the big night. Shoot RAW!

Don
10-23-2007, 01:04 PM   #7
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Aperture (no 'a' in the middle) is the size of the opening in the lens contraption called an aperture. Little numbers 1, 1.4, 1.7, 2.0, 2.4 are big openings--wide open aperture.

Shutter speed is how fast the shutter is, or more properly how long it's open in seconds. 1/1000 is faster than 1/250.; the smaller numbers are faster.


QuoteOriginally posted by momof4 Quote
Thanks ARPE----wide open, shutter speed, aperature----all are a foreign language to me!
10-23-2007, 04:44 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by momof4 Quote
Thanks ARPE----wide open, shutter speed, aperature----all are a foreign language to me! I do understand the ISO, though! Where about are you located in New Zealand? My daughter was born there 11 years ago while our family was there on work/visitors permits. We haven't been there for 10 years. She was born in Takapuna/Auckland. We lived in Devonport for 2 years and really loved it. The people we met were wonderful and the scenery is amazing!
I'm in Wellington, don't often get to Auckland. Auckland just beat Wellington in the Provincial Rugby competition final, boo hiss. There is at least one other Kiwi on here from Ak - Mingdie, you'll see him posting pictures of boats or his son dancing on boats.

Remember, for aperture - small number=small amount in focus=big opening. So big number=...=...

10-23-2007, 05:20 PM   #9
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Okay, so for lower light settings, I need a wide opening and for regular or bright light I need a smaller opening? What other times do I need a wide aperature and what other times do i need a smaller aperature?

When do I use a faster shutter speed? I am assuming that is for sports, kids and moving animals and a slower shutter speed for low light settings (to let more light in?)

Thanks!
10-23-2007, 05:27 PM   #10
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Here's a little reading for you. it's a simple and complex subject all in one. Something all of us deal with and find creative solutions to all the time. So instead of a long winded post this link does a good job of explaining the subject. You could also get the book: Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson

How understanding exposure can lead to better photos
10-24-2007, 06:04 AM   #11
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I HIGHLY recommend buying and reading Bryan Peterson's "Understanding Exposure" (could be found in your local Borders/B&N or at Amazon). It's a fairly quick read and will help you understand all about apertures, shutter speeds, and ISO.
10-27-2007, 10:59 PM   #12
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I think wielding a big long 2.8 lens and getting good focused and sharp images is a skill that takes a while to learn, so consider this before spending the big bucks these fast lenses cost.

Also consider that 2.8 was perhaps more important in the days of film, when the iso range was more limited, high iso + noise removal + post processing can yield good images of action, as well with a slower f4 lens.
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