Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
04-11-2011, 06:35 AM   #1
Senior Member




Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 288
Would the DA 70 make a good portrait lens?

One that I could use professionally (one day) for outdoor portraits? It would be the only lens that I'd have because I would have to sell all my other ones to get it. I would then use that DA 70 to make money to buy others. I know it's more about the photographer on the being able to make money part but as far as the lens goes is this a good choice for my idea?

04-11-2011, 07:00 AM   #2
Loyal Site Supporter
blackcloudbrew's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Cotati, California USA
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 3,782
I am not a pro and doing portraits is not my most favorite thing, but while I owned the DA 70 I did some portrait work and took some workshops on portraiture. Compared to my DA*16-50, Vivitar 85, and DFA 100, I found the DA 70 to be just the right length for studio work. I sold it after a while not because I didn't like it but as a trade for an UWA lens I wanted. I still miss it. My current portrait lens is a Voigtlander Nokton 58mm. It's a bit shorter than the DA70 but I've been able to work with that.

Bottom line answer is yes, it's a decent portrait lens.
04-11-2011, 07:10 AM   #3
Veteran Member
RioRico's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Limbo, California
Posts: 11,264
The DA70 is a fine lens and is good for headshots. That is not the best focal length for other uses, certainly not what I'd want as an only lens.

I see that you have 28-70 and 70-200 lenses -- do you shoot a lot at 70 with those lenses? I also see that you have a set of very fine Takumars. Maybe rather than sell everything for one lens that you *hope* will make you money sometime in the future, you could think of other ways to "plug the hole" between 55mm and 135mm. For portrait-range shots, a favorite of mine is an old M42 Sears-Tokina 55-135/3.5, a fairly fast constant-aperture workhorse that performs well.

Another option is even cheaper: Zoom with your feet. With the superb Tak 55/1.5 on your Kx, take a long step forward. Now you have the FOV (field of view) of a 70mm lens. Take another long step forward, you've got the FOV of a 90mm lens. Or use your excellent Tak 135/3.5 and take three steps back. You should be able to make revenue-generating shots with those!

Our of curiosity: Have you sold any pictures yet?
04-11-2011, 07:50 AM   #4
Senior Member




Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 288
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by RioRico Quote
The DA70 is a fine lens and is good for headshots. That is not the best focal length for other uses, certainly not what I'd want as an only lens.

I see that you have 28-70 and 70-200 lenses -- do you shoot a lot at 70 with those lenses? I also see that you have a set of very fine Takumars. Maybe rather than sell everything for one lens that you *hope* will make you money sometime in the future, you could think of other ways to "plug the hole" between 55mm and 135mm. For portrait-range shots, a favorite of mine is an old M42 Sears-Tokina 55-135/3.5, a fairly fast constant-aperture workhorse that performs well.

Another option is even cheaper: Zoom with your feet. With the superb Tak 55/1.5 on your Kx, take a long step forward. Now you have the FOV (field of view) of a 70mm lens. Take another long step forward, you've got the FOV of a 90mm lens. Or use your excellent Tak 135/3.5 and take three steps back. You should be able to make revenue-generating shots with those!

Our of curiosity: Have you sold any pictures yet?

No, not at all. One day I want to. I know I don't have the skills right now. I also looked at the FA 77. I am finding the manuals harder to use than I though and decided to look at autofocus options. I know no lens or camera will make great pictures if I can't take a good picture but I don't want to cripple myself. I suppose maybe I should just stick it out with the manual ones.

04-11-2011, 08:20 AM   #5
Pentaxian
v5planet's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Seattle
Photos: Albums
Posts: 1,904
QuoteOriginally posted by justtakingpics Quote
No, not at all. One day I want to. I know I don't have the skills right now. I also looked at the FA 77. I am finding the manuals harder to use than I though and decided to look at autofocus options. I know no lens or camera will make great pictures if I can't take a good picture but I don't want to cripple myself. I suppose maybe I should just stick it out with the manual ones.
You are not crippling yourself by using less expensive, manual focus lenses. In fact, if you have to limit yourself to a single lens in order to afford a 70 or 77, you will be crippling yourself a lot more.

I agree with RioRico that you can get a lot of mileage out of your Takumars. I think at this point, learning technique will be more helpful than a new lens. My favorite portraits that I've done were taken with my Takumar 50/1.4 and 105/2.8; believe me, you're not crippling yourself with these lenses.

In many ways a 70 or 77 will be better, but only if you have the skill set to take advantage of the performance gap; like that focal length; and don't have to sacrifice the rest of your lenses just to own one of those.
04-11-2011, 08:29 AM   #6
Senior Member




Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 288
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by v5planet Quote
You are not crippling yourself by using less expensive, manual focus lenses. In fact, if you have to limit yourself to a single lens in order to afford a 70 or 77, you will be crippling yourself a lot more.

I agree with RioRico that you can get a lot of mileage out of your Takumars. I think at this point, learning technique will be more helpful than a new lens. My favorite portraits that I've done were taken with my Takumar 50/1.4 and 105/2.8; believe me, you're not crippling yourself with these lenses.

In many ways a 70 or 77 will be better, but only if you have the skill set to take advantage of the performance gap; like that focal length; and don't have to sacrifice the rest of your lenses just to own one of those.
ok. Thanks. I will continue, not giving up so easily.
04-11-2011, 09:10 AM   #7
Loyal Site Supporter
blackcloudbrew's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Cotati, California USA
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 3,782
Good for you!

I think you also got some good advice from the others as well. Ultimately, it's you the photographer that will be the most critical element in your shots. The right lens can help but you can do a lot yourself. Good luck!
04-11-2011, 09:20 AM   #8
Pentaxian
Marc Sabatella's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Denver, CO
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 10,686
But to answer the basic question here: the DA70 was designed to be a portrait lens. If that focal length works for you (it does for me, but I'm not a professional), then it should eb a great choice. But I'd certainly want shorter and longer choices available too.

04-11-2011, 10:55 AM   #9
Veteran Member




Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 2,311
Everyone got their own preferences and tastes to what their portraits should look like.

My very humble opinion is (i have the lens):
The focal lenght + its max aperture (f2,4) + used in midrange distances, (headshots, closeups) = Great photography. Thats it. This lens is so versatile. Use it in landscape or closeups or portraits.

Its size, build quality and quick shift is sweet things on the side, making it worth every penny.

You can keep an eye on the market place for a used one. The used ones is always in great shape from
people who take care of their stuff!
04-11-2011, 11:15 AM   #10
Senior Member




Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 288
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by the swede Quote
Everyone got their own preferences and tastes to what their portraits should look like.

My very humble opinion is (i have the lens):
The focal lenght + its max aperture (f2,4) + used in midrange distances, (headshots, closeups) = Great photography. Thats it. This lens is so versatile. Use it in landscape or closeups or portraits.

Its size, build quality and quick shift is sweet things on the side, making it worth every penny.

You can keep an eye on the market place for a used one. The used ones is always in great shape from
people who take care of their stuff!
Do you mean the da 70 or the fa 77?
04-11-2011, 11:17 AM   #11
Veteran Member




Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 2,311
QuoteOriginally posted by justtakingpics Quote
Do you mean the da 70 or the fa 77?
whoops.... sorry... i mean DA 70
04-11-2011, 12:08 PM   #12
Site Supporter
SpecialK's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: So California
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 14,430
For portraits, generally the subject is not moving fast and it should be one of the times where manual focusing is relatively easy.

Also generally, portraits do not to be super sharp unless you like retouching.

Last edited by SpecialK; 04-11-2011 at 02:37 PM.
04-11-2011, 12:25 PM   #13
Senior Member




Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 288
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by SpecialK Quote
For portraits, generally the subject is not moving fast and it should be of the times where manual focusing is relatively easy.

Also generally, portraits do not to be super sharp unless you like retouching.
This shows my ignorance. I never thought about that (retouching).
04-11-2011, 01:09 PM   #14
Senior Member




Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Ft. Myers Florida
Posts: 169
QuoteOriginally posted by justtakingpics Quote
This shows my ignorance. I never thought about that (retouching).
The lenses you have will be fine. Experiment with them. Get an inexpensive soft focus filter. Women do not like portraits that are too close to reality.

Have a look at a master's work. See anything razor sharp?

Legends Online: Arnold Newman
04-11-2011, 01:52 PM   #15
Veteran Member
Pentaxor's Avatar

Join Date: May 2009
Location: Vancouver, B.C.
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 6,513
QuoteOriginally posted by Spotmatic Quote
The lenses you have will be fine. Experiment with them. Get an inexpensive soft focus filter. Women do not like portraits that are too close to reality.

Have a look at a master's work. See anything razor sharp?

Legends Online: Arnold Newman
why would he still need a soft focus filter when you can do that during post-processing. atleast the OP can adjust the intensity of the softness that he wanted on the image. if he really wants a lens with a kind of soft-focus effect, the J-9 would be a great alternative.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
da, k-mount, lens, money, pentax lens, slr lens
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Good Portrait Lens...need help in decision twix23919 Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 41 12-16-2010 10:38 AM
Wanted: Good value indoor portrait lens Black_ronin Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 30 10-27-2010 09:44 AM
Good all-around portrait Lens ~$300? cputeq Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 22 04-26-2008 12:11 AM
A good portrait lens? Macneil Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 18 09-06-2007 04:14 AM
pentax need a cheap good portrait lens 85/1.8 xbadx Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 11 06-26-2007 02:17 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:02 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top