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04-16-2011, 07:16 AM   #1
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Shooting WA, ie DA 15

I just acquired the DA 15 lens a couple weeks ago and really haven't had a chance to uses it much. The weather has been terrrible.
Anyway, I am just looking for tip and ideas. I primarily purchased this lens for an upcoming trip to Utah National Parks and Grand Canyon but I of course want to get more use out of it just that.
One thing I have noticed is that I am more of a telephoto person. It just seems thats how I see. But I want to explore other types of photography becasue I just love it all in general.

Question: Subjest matter. I believe WA lenses are used mostly for landscapes and architecture. For the type of landscapes I have done before this wouldn't work because of the distance from subject. I usually shoot from a distance and the subject matter is miniaturized. Does this mean of course I need to shoot from a much closer range? I do believe that I will now be capable to shots when there is very little distance between subject matter, a big plus in some cases.

Question: I also noticed that some photos posted look as they are more of a pano shot, they have a different dimension. Are they cropped to look this way.
At my cameras settings every photo will come aout with the same dimension, sensor size. Dot I need to change the format when shooting WA?

If the weather doesn't cooperate today I may plan on visiting the indoor Flight Muesum which I think this lens will be ideal for some shots.

One thing I do know is that I just need to get out and play around with it. I am just hoping to get some tips and insight an possible ideas for different subject matter and uses.

Thanks all
Oren


Last edited by OrenMc; 04-16-2011 at 07:21 AM.
04-16-2011, 07:35 AM   #2
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QuoteOriginally posted by OrenMc Quote
posted look as they are more of a pano shot, they have a different dimension. Are they cropped to look this way.
Yep..either they are cropped or they are a bundling of several images into one. Shooting your WA will get you images of the same size than with any other lens.

QuoteOriginally posted by OrenMc Quote
I believe WA lenses are used mostly for landscapes and architecture.
There are a lot of closeup's of things and people too...you get close and personal and get images with somewhat forced perspectives (there is a big number of portraits or group shots out there with WA lenses).

QuoteOriginally posted by OrenMc Quote
One thing I do know is that I just need to get out and play around with it. I am just hoping to get some tips and insight an possible ideas for different subject matter and uses.
Shoot it anywhere...use it inside tight places to get forced perspectives. Shoot portraits, low and upper angle to produce some cool effects...
Use it from a room corner...
Have fun that is a great litle lens you got there, the "15mm limited controls my mind" thread may be a good source of ideas.

Last edited by Coeurdechene; 04-16-2011 at 07:48 AM.
04-16-2011, 09:30 AM   #3
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You want ideas? There are almost 2,000 posts in the thread "15mm limited controls my mind (club)". Thats where I go for ideas on shooting my da15.

https://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/lens-clubs/86234-15mm-limited-controls-my-mind-club.html

Lots of posted shots to learn from.
04-16-2011, 10:16 AM   #4
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Thanks for the quick response you two. I have checked out the DA 15 thread and it was helpful in my choice to purchase. Awesome thread!
As I stated earlier I know I need to just get out and practice. Washington State has some really beautiful scenic areas so I am not lacking there and Seattle provides some fantastic city and nightscapes ( something I haven't been out to do for some time but is on my to-do list today weather permitting ).

Wish me luck

04-16-2011, 10:21 AM   #5
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IMO wide angle lenses are used to exaggerate the foreground to background distance. It's all about perspective, not how much you can "fit" into the image.

If you're new to wide angle lenses you can just play around the house. Take a head-sized item and place it on a table. Shoot it with a telephoto. Then pop on the DA15 and bring the camera in so the subject size is the same size in the fame. Look at the difference and try it with other objects.

Just remember that wide angle shots with no foreground interest tend to be a bit boring. happy shooting
04-16-2011, 03:30 PM - 1 Like   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by OrenMc Quote

One thing I have noticed is that I am more of a telephoto person. It just seems thats how I see. I believe WA lenses are used mostly for landscapes and architecture.
For about 40 years I didn't use anything shorter than 50mm. I was quite happy with an SMC 85/1.8 as a normal lens for FF film. I just wasn't seeing in wide angle and to a large extent it was due to a false perception of 'wide angle' lenses as being solely a distant landscape tool.

When I transitioned to DSLRs and was freed (economically?) to experiment more I discovered that lens focal length, whether WA or telephoto, was a perspective tool, not a crop tool.

I'm certainly not yet totally into the WA world, but a Tamron 10-24 and a DA 16-45 are teaching me to see common subjects from a different point of view, although I do have to intentional look for the different ideas.

- Don't think of focal length as only a crop factor

- Do set yourself specific goals for exploring perspective

- Think about background and DoF as well as subject matter

H2
04-16-2011, 03:48 PM   #7
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Yes, for WA lenses, you have to be much closer to your subject to get interesting perspectives. Remember, WA lenses are not the answer for all landscapes. They are for emphasizing the foreground all the way from your viewpoint. So if you're standing right in the middle of a scene, or in a valley, or at the edge of a lake or something, they're invaluable, but for emphasizing stuff that's all pretty far away, not so much.

For example, I find the most pleasing focal length for my shots of the Seattle skyline from say Kerry Park, or Gas Works Park is in fact 30-35mm. There's little of interest in the foreground, so a WA would just include lots of pointless stuff, all while making the stuff of interest (Space Needle, Mt. Rainier, etc.) look like ants.

WA lenses are awesome tools, and I love my DA 15, but you really have to go out and see through the viewfinder to really figure out what they do. They really provide a very different view of the world from your own eyes, and once you learn to visualize that way, you'll love it. Oh, and try shooting into the sun for all sorts of unique shots that you normally wouldn't with other lenses (due to flare/rendering). With the 15, it's addictive.
04-16-2011, 04:24 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by Cannikin Quote
WA lenses are awesome tools, and I love my DA 15, but you really have to go out and see through the viewfinder to really figure out what they do. They really provide a very different view of the world from your own eyes, and once you learn to visualize that way, you'll love it. Oh, and try shooting into the sun for all sorts of unique shots that you normally wouldn't with other lenses (due to flare/rendering). With the 15, it's addictive.
Very true. One exercise I found fun was to look through the viewfinder with one eye, and keep the other eye open as well. Move side to side and see how the perspective and angle of view in the viewfinder compares to what your eye naturally sees. It's a little trippy at first, having two types of visual feedback simultaneously, but you very quickly get a sense for what a UWA lens will DO to a scene.

04-17-2011, 08:32 AM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by pacerr Quote
For about 40 years I didn't use anything shorter than 50mm. I was quite happy with an SMC 85/1.8 as a normal lens for FF film. I just wasn't seeing in wide angle and to a large extent it was due to a false perception of 'wide angle' lenses as being solely a distant landscape tool.

When I transitioned to DSLRs and was freed (economically?) to experiment more I discovered that lens focal length, whether WA or telephoto, was a perspective tool, not a crop tool.

I'm certainly not yet totally into the WA world, but a Tamron 10-24 and a DA 16-45 are teaching me to see common subjects from a different point of view, although I do have to intentional look for the different ideas.

- Don't think of focal length as only a crop factor

- Do set yourself specific goals for exploring perspective

- Think about background and DoF as well as subject matter

H2
Thank you pacer
Sometimes I wish I had that many years of experience but as it is I really only have around 6 years, 3 years of that with a p&s that I always had with me when I was out scrambling in the hills. If I remeber correctly the P&S's I owned only went as wide as 28mm and it wasn't unusual to be zoomed out much more than that to get my shots. ( if you check out the photos at the beginning of my Flickr that will give you and idea of the landscape shots I used to take). I would love to able to get out like that again but my health won't permit it right now but hopefully in the future. Right now my mind it trained to view telephoto it seems.
Good tip to remember " it's a perspective tool, not a crop"

QuoteOriginally posted by Cannikin Quote
Yes, for WA lenses, you have to be much closer to your subject to get interesting perspectives. Remember, WA lenses are not the answer for all landscapes. They are for emphasizing the foreground all the way from your viewpoint. So if you're standing right in the middle of a scene, or in a valley, or at the edge of a lake or something, they're invaluable, but for emphasizing stuff that's all pretty far away, not so much.

For example, I find the most pleasing focal length for my shots of the Seattle skyline from say Kerry Park, or Gas Works Park is in fact 30-35mm. There's little of interest in the foreground, so a WA would just include lots of pointless stuff, all while making the stuff of interest (Space Needle, Mt. Rainier, etc.) look like ants.

WA lenses are awesome tools, and I love my DA 15, but you really have to go out and see through the viewfinder to really figure out what they do. They really provide a very different view of the world from your own eyes, and once you learn to visualize that way, you'll love it. Oh, and try shooting into the sun for all sorts of unique shots that you normally wouldn't with other lenses (due to flare/rendering). With the 15, it's addictive.
Your right Cannkin and thank you fellow Seattleite, the shots from Gasworks or Kerry parks will be worthless taken with this lens. Thats one thing that has kept me from getting a WA lens because from my vantage points so far everything does look like ants. I just need to find different subject matter that I can shoot at a much closer distance. I know when I am in Anelope Canyon in Souther Utah this spring it will be invaluable. I went to the Flight Museum yesterday but the parking lot was full so I didn't even attempt going in. I think that will be a great venue for some photos also.
I also want to try some photos of Amgen Bridge again ( I have one in my gallery taken with Siggy 17-70).
And I am really looking forward to tryiong out the flare resistance of this lens.


QuoteOriginally posted by v5planet Quote
Very true. One exercise I found fun was to look through the viewfinder with one eye, and keep the other eye open as well. Move side to side and see how the perspective and angle of view in the viewfinder compares to what your eye naturally sees. It's a little trippy at first, having two types of visual feedback simultaneously, but you very quickly get a sense for what a UWA lens will DO to a scene.
Thanks for the exersice v5planet, I will most definately have to try this.

I might need to lock up my 300mm and forget where I put the key for awhile. It most always what I reach for.

Last edited by OrenMc; 04-17-2011 at 08:42 AM.
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