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06-19-2011, 08:30 AM   #16
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Tell your wife congratulations - sounds like fun!

The coldest I had my K7 was -38C for an hour. Even with high wind chill, single battery was fine. I gave up well before the camera did.

Your gear list looks good - I wouldn't bother with a WR lens.. the biggest issue with cold is the transition back indoors. I would recommend taking some large zip-top bags (large enough to fit the camera with lens attached.) Just before you come back inside, put the camera in the bag and seal it. Once you're inside, let the camera warm up inside the bag and you won't have to worry about condensation.

06-19-2011, 10:21 AM - 1 Like   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by Tonto Quote
So my Wife is going to Antartica!
Will she take mine with her?
06-21-2011, 01:48 AM   #18
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Big thanks for all the replies. Have used the camera in humid conditions before so well versed in condesation issues but will most likely do the ziplock thing and be sure to grab another battery or two.
At this stage I may prompt for a DA 12-24 for the wide stuff as it sees WR isn't that necessary. So that, the FA 31 and the DAL 55-300 would cover a great range and be good around the boat aswell (leaving me with our Kx 18-55 and 70-200 ).
My main concern will be lens changes so futher info on effect of this would be appreciated.
06-21-2011, 03:33 AM   #19
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I'd be checking whether your wife is doing any transfers to shore on zodiacs? If so water resistance would be very beneficial.... the journey to Antarctica is obviously very different that to the arctic...

here's a frequently quoted section from a travel journal of a photographer on a trip to antarctica

QuoteQuote:
The weather proved a tad too much for my equipment, and almost too much for me! Rain combined with strong winds meant that the waves were constantly crashing over our zodiac, drenching all on board. I’m not sure what the temperature was, but because of the wet, I was absolutely freezing. Thank goodness my Columbia clothing kept my torso nice and dry, but ice water seeped it’s down the top of my pants, and my hands were frozen claws. My Canon camera was worse off than me – it simply died.

I was devastated for a little while, as I was silly enough to not bring a backup kit, but Jason later produced a Pentax body and lens kit for me to use. Phew! Pentax has invested a lot in weather sealing their cameras, and it obviously makes a huge difference. All the passengers I know who had their cameras out today experienced some sort of fault, only Jason’s gear kept going.



Last edited by twitch; 06-21-2011 at 03:38 AM.
06-21-2011, 03:52 AM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by twitch Quote
I'd be checking whether your wife is doing any transfers to shore on zodiacs? If so water resistance would be very beneficial.... the journey to Antarctica is obviously very different that to the arctic...

here's a frequently quoted section from a travel journal of a photographer on a trip to antarctica
In either latitude, prepare for the worst case scenario, not the best.
06-21-2011, 09:55 PM   #21
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I've had the great fortune to take that "trip of a lifetime". Given the expense, an extra backup camera is minimal additional cost; sell it afterward if you have to. I did find my batteries ran down, but the real issue was having the right chargers to meet the ship electrical standards. Most important thing to take would be extra batteries, converters, chargers, and all kinds of random adaptors.

Other ideas:

A monopod is easier than a tripod when dealing with zodiacs and hikes.

Water resistance is useful, for unexpected sea water, and lots of spitting rain/snow/sleet/sideways wind.

The tele zoom will be used. I found that when the right moment ocurred, I did not have the 300mm I really needed.

Did I say extra batteries and extra body?
06-21-2011, 11:57 PM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by Tonto Quote
...My main concern will be lens changes so futher info on effect of this would be appreciated.
I think apart from the obvious avoidance of lens changes in rain/sleet/snow/spray/dusty/windy conditions, the other thing to watch for would be allowing humid air into the camera - because the extreme cold may result in internal condensation.

So, limit lens changes to good conditions outdoors, or indoors if the air is at low humidity and the camera is at room temperature.
06-22-2011, 03:18 PM   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by MetaD Quote
I've had the great fortune to take that "trip of a lifetime". Given the expense, an extra backup camera is minimal additional cost;.............Did I say extra batteries and extra body?
Doh, oh well may try to find a second hand K10 so I can do long exposures, no point sending the Kx as it isnt WR.
The hardest thing will be training my wife! Thankfully not untill early next year so plenty of time to save up for equipment and train! train! train! (insert Rocky music here!)

06-22-2011, 05:42 PM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by Tonto Quote
Doh, oh well may try to find a second hand K10 so I can do long exposures, no point sending the Kx as it isnt WR.
The hardest thing will be training my wife! Thankfully not untill early next year so plenty of time to save up for equipment and train! train! train! (insert Rocky music here!)
In our house, 'She who can do no wrong' takes to aperture/DOF just as cheerfully as the two driving lessons she tolerated. So I set her at f8 or so on AV and back off. After a year or so, she finally backed down and asked what the funny l'il beep was when the l'il red light flashed in the viewfinder. Good luck that!
06-26-2011, 08:37 AM   #25
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Mines abit better than that, often asking me the best shutter speed as she wants to blur water features and recently cottoned on to use of the CPL filter. She does tend to shoot alot of front and center shots, without making a subject or getting close enough. But then she can pull off some great shots especially with Man focus and mode which I find hard on the kx to do! I feel I'm in good hands.
06-26-2011, 08:52 AM   #26
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It's interesting no one is discussing really long lenses. I have considered an antarctic trip and would think a reliable long lens would be in the cards
06-26-2011, 08:59 AM   #27
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Ah, the steady diet of cubes of butter, still the weight comes off!

It will be interesting to see if Pentax cameras fare better than the Canon 5Ds did there -- some folks had no problems, but more than one did.
06-26-2011, 01:26 PM   #28
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Good point, Lowell. And if manual is the standar choice, there's great lenses out there at reasonable prices.
06-26-2011, 02:50 PM   #29
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QuoteOriginally posted by jac Quote
Good point, Lowell. And if manual is the standar choice, there's great lenses out there at reasonable prices.
I know I just got a tamron 200-500/5.6 MF lens for a reasonable price. I just need some time now to work out the support it weighs 2.4kg
06-26-2011, 10:10 PM   #30
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My Nikon 70-300mm has been an extremely useful lens length for travel with my D90. A bit slow at the long end for birds in jungle, but the extra ISO stop on the D7000 sensor would ease that restriction a bit. There was a Potoo, sitting on a branch in Ecuador, and I couldn't extract a decent shop from the shadows...

On Pentax, the comparable lens would be the 50-250mm. Since Antarctica is well-lit (as opposed to jungle floor), this shouldn't be a problem. No need for a super-tele. It turns out that the wildlife in Antarctica is extraordinarily unafraid of people. Even the leopard seal nursing a baby (wow!) If you can get to 250mm, you get most of the good shots you need.
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