Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
11-02-2011, 08:35 PM   #1
Site Supporter




Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Mumbai, India
Posts: 396
28mm on APS-C

Hey, so I've acquired a nice FA28/2.8 on this forum. This is only my second AF prime, the other being the FA50/1.4, which I find very useful for portraits. What do you guys normally use the 28mm FL for? Set it to F8, and everything outside a 3 metre radius in focus? Landscapes?
I ask because I'm having difficulty with this lens even in an indoor setting. It seems like a natural FL, but my style either forces me to go wider or longer, with my DA16-45.

Thanks in advance

11-02-2011, 08:39 PM   #2
Pentaxian
JinDesu's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: New York City
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 5,626
Portraits with the upper body involved, especially at 2.8.
11-02-2011, 09:03 PM   #3
Veteran Member
RioRico's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Limbo, California
Posts: 11,264
I use 28s for full-body portraits, 'scapes, and just general shooting when I want a 'normal' field of view. I find 24s more useful indoors. I can force myself to use 35s. But 28s just reproduce what I am seeing without straining my eyes.
11-02-2011, 11:29 PM   #4
Veteran Member




Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Southern England
Posts: 495
The 28mm focal length corresponds to about the same perspective as the human eye when it's used with and aps-c sensor, so it's pretty useful from that point of view. It can be useful for landscapes, particularly where you don't want to include acres of boring sky (though often you'll want something wider, I suspect).

Do be careful about depth of field, though. Don't expect as much DOF as you would get with the lens mounted on a 35mm film camera (this has been the subject of a rather heated debate in the past). Mind you, it all rather depends upon how large you print the image and how closely you're looking at it. Anyway, there are plenty of DOF calculators freely available on the Internet, and these will give you some indication of how much DOF to expect in various situations and viewing conditions (do be careful to specify an aps-c sensor, though).

Don't forget also, when straining for extra DOF, the image quality will inevitably start to deteriorate beyond about f11 (for any decent lens, owing to the effects of diffraction). However, this may be an acceptable price to pay.

11-03-2011, 01:19 AM   #5
Site Supporter




Join Date: Oct 2011
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 267
Whenever I take only one lens with me, it's a 28mm. I have an M f3.5 which is great for landscapes and an A f2.8 that I use indoors. They have both excellent optical qualities although I have used another A sample before that was not as good. I have yet to find a not bulky 24mm that is as good as those two. The closest is perhaps the Sigma super-wide II, but I still prefer the 28s.
11-03-2011, 01:36 AM   #6
Veteran Member




Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Flushing NY
Photos: Albums
Posts: 412
I'm dying for a good 24mm. I was most comfortable with 35mm on film, and that's pretty close to the same angle of view. I have a manual focus Sigma 24mm, but I don't like it much. I'd be happy to shoot with a 28, but I already have the FA 31, so it would seem redundant.
11-03-2011, 01:58 AM   #7
Site Supporter
Stone G.'s Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: North Zealand, Denmark
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,516
QuoteOriginally posted by bhairavp Quote
Hey, so I've acquired a nice FA28/2.8 on this forum. This is only my second AF prime, the other being the FA50/1.4, which I find very useful for portraits. What do you guys normally use the 28mm FL for? Set it to F8, and everything outside a 3 metre radius in focus? Landscapes?
I ask because I'm having difficulty with this lens even in an indoor setting. It seems like a natural FL, but my style either forces me to go wider or longer, with my DA16-45.

Thanks in advance
I find fast lenses in the 24 - 28 mm range excellent for city/street photos with an APS-C camera. With a prime - in contast to a zoom - you will have to (re-)discover how much a few steps forth and back will change the scene and composition of your image.
11-03-2011, 05:08 AM - 1 Like   #8
Veteran Member




Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Flushing NY
Photos: Albums
Posts: 412
QuoteOriginally posted by Stone G. Quote
With a prime - in contast to a zoom - you will have to (re-)discover how much a few steps forth and back will change the scene and composition of your image.
Good advice; twenty years ago or so when I was dragging a 35-135mm zoom around China I ruined a lot of shots by not paying attention to camera to subject distance.

But: it's up to the photographer whether he/she lets the zoom disengage his/her feet from the situation. And perspective is part of the scene and composition too. I might "zoom" in by cropping (I don't own any good zooms) in preference to getting physically closer because I want to preserve the flattened perspective of distance.

11-03-2011, 10:00 AM   #9
Veteran Member
RioRico's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Limbo, California
Posts: 11,264
QuoteOriginally posted by pentup Quote
I'm dying for a good 24mm. I was most comfortable with 35mm on film, and that's pretty close to the same angle of view. I have a manual focus Sigma 24mm, but I don't like it much. I'd be happy to shoot with a 28, but I already have the FA 31, so it would seem redundant.
The best of the affordable 24's AFAIK is the Vivitar-Kiron 24/2 in KM mount. Probably less than US$150. I like mine. And the best of the affordable 28's IMHO is the Vivitar-Komine 28/2 CFWA. Mine was way cheap. My second-best, the Tamron BBAR 28/2.5, was way cheaper. But if you have the FA31Ltd, why bother with a 28 indeed? Except that the FA31's close focus is 30cm and the Konime CFWA's is 16cm.

ObTopic: One feature of 28's is a lack of distortion. I see edge distortion with anything 25mm or shorter, and don't with any 28. If I want to record what's there, I use a 28. IMHO the best source images for stitched panos are vertical (portrait-mode) 28mm frames. For full-body portraits, it's 28mm. For snapshooting / drama / fun where rectilinear distortion is no big thang, then 24-21-18-15-whatever-mm can be great. I use my 24/2 for interiors and my 21/3.8 for land-sea-sky-town-scapes. But when edges and accuracy matter, it's 28mm for me.
11-05-2011, 04:39 AM   #10
axl
Veteran Member




Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Nove Zamky, Slovakia
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 7,181
As others have said, 28mm is pretty much normal FL for APSC. Problem is, normal can get very boring. I used to have one 28mm (Tokina RMC f2.8) and now have this angle covered by 28-70 FA* which is escellent at f2.8. But I never liked that FOV as much as 24mm. I've gone through K24/2.8 and Sigma AF Superwide II and finally settled on FA*24. As RioRico says, 24 exhibits more distortions, softer corner and can exagerate perspective distortions far more than 28mm but, for me at least, it's far more interesting angle of view, perfect for people. More engaging and more creative.
11-05-2011, 05:19 AM   #11
Veteran Member
Jimfear's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Uppsala, Sweden
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 576
Using my two 28s for different things. The K28/3.5 is sort of a walkaround lens, using it as I use a 50 with a film body, but missing the opportunities of large aperture. The Vivitar (Kiron) 28/2 on the other hand has a really funky bokeh wide open, so that one I use for portraits to make the background interesting. I see the Vivitar more as a lens to use on digital as the optical distortions don't really fit in the 28mm FOV on film. The K28 being just as wonderful on film as with digital.
11-05-2011, 08:33 AM   #12
Pentaxian
Marc Sabatella's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Denver, CO
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 10,686
QuoteOriginally posted by axl Quote
As others have said, 28mm is pretty much normal FL for APSC. Problem is, normal can get very boring.
I'd agree with this assessment. It's a convenient focal length if you want to use just one prime for a while, and I've gotten plenty of mileage out of mine. But I seldom take it with me any more, because I find most shots I might take with it, I could make more interesting by going longer or going wider. For longer, 40mm hits a sweet spot for me (as evidenced by my zoom usage; it's not just that I happen to have a 40mm prime). I like the normalish FOV but with extra subject isolation. When I don't want to isolate the subject but show surroundings more, sure 28mm works great, but wider often works even better. For me, though, 24mm just doesn't float my boat. Nor does 21. I go all the way down to 15 and come in closer still (at least for shots at close enough range for a few steps to make a difference). It's mostly landscape situations where I might actually miss the 28mm FOV, as I might not have a particular subject I'm interested in emphasizing with a 40 nor will taking a few steps forward with the 15 accomplish anything. The fact that my 28mm lens was also my least expensive lens (literally, I got it for a song - in trade for a CD) and the fact that it has no electronics to get mucked up means that it,s biggest use these days is as an outdoor lens for rainy/snowy days.
11-05-2011, 09:54 AM   #13
Site Supporter
stevebrot's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Vancouver (USA)
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 27,436
I have two 28s and seldom use them on my K20D. I don't know why, but it just feels like a clumsy focal length for APS-C. Too long for interiors and a little too short for most everything else. OTOH, my FA 35/2 pretty much lives on the camera. Go, figure!

Put either of the 28s on one of my 35mm film cameras, however, and I am in hog heaven. It is an incredibly useful focal length for that format.


Steve
11-05-2011, 11:00 AM - 1 Like   #14
Veteran Member
RioRico's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Limbo, California
Posts: 11,264
We all have our own stories; they chart our evolution. I used to avoid 28mm because it *is* normal, too normal maybe, so I'd shoot much shorter or much longer to make more interesting pictures. But then I went back to 'normal' which I'd used in previous incarnations, like fixed-lens film and digicams, because 'normal' made me work more. Rather than the lens making the picture interesting, it's up to *ME* to make an interesting picture.

Normal certainly isn't a one-size-fits-all. In small spaces I want the Tamron 10-24; in medium spaces, the F35-70. A Fifty has its tightened viewpoint. But 28mm makes me think about compositions and inclusions, makes me move to frame the image, in ways that other focal lengths don't. What to juxtapose? Which angles work?

With the Komine 28/2 CFWA I can shoot close and wide-open for thin DOF, or stop-down and hyperfocus for great depth. But I must make sure that everything in the picture belongs there. It's rather like working at an extreme -- late yesterday afternoon I was shooting an Enna 240/4.5 in a small town, and it forced me to some striking shots I wouldn't even have seen with another lens.

Any lens is a more-or-less unique window on the world. 'Normal' (28-31mm on APS-C) makes me think carefully about what to put in that window. That goes for any lens, sure. I can shoot looser with shorter glass, tighter with longer lenses. But normalcy is a subtle trap. The lens won't rescue me, won't give me any special effects. I must outsmart the plain-vanilla FOV. It's a useful challenge.

Last edited by RioRico; 11-05-2011 at 11:13 AM.
11-05-2011, 08:54 PM   #15
Veteran Member




Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: In the present
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,870
I did a "Single in <month>" last year using the 28mm f/2.8 and found that I really loved it for what I refer to as architectural detail. It has a certain quality that is quite nice for architecture. Have never been able to put my finger on it, but it has the look of an illustration almost. Also shoots beautiful half-body portraits.

Yes, f/8 or f/11...

As for difficult... where you'd go longer, walk up on your subject. This lens excels close in. It is very sharp. Get in there. You'll be glad you did. Where you'd go wider? Like 16mm wide? Use the 16. Or better yet get the DA 15mm.

Best thing to do is join "Single in <month>" and shoot a photo every day with this lens. You'll figure it out. I think it's really a pretty decent FL on APS-C.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
28mm, fl, k-mount, pentax lens, slr lens
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
best 50mm for K-x aps-c boosted03gti Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 18 12-06-2010 10:54 PM
The K-5 is the best APS-C DSLR Adam Pentax News and Rumors 55 11-09-2010 01:55 AM
Much point for the SMC 28mm SHIFT with APS-C for architecture? JayR Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 18 06-07-2010 05:02 AM
35mm / APS-C - sophotec Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 20 05-23-2010 01:07 PM
Question regarding 35mm vs APS-C boodiespost Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 7 12-10-2009 11:02 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:57 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top