Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
12-20-2007, 10:59 PM   #1
Veteran Member
Buddha Jones's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Charlotte, NC
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,591
What the heck is this?

A 'shift' lens?
PENTAX 28mm SHIFT LENS PENTAX SHIFT 28mm LENS - (eBay item 360005976379 end time Dec-24-07 14:02:43 PST)

12-20-2007, 11:02 PM   #2
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
Canada_Rockies's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Sparwood, BC, Canada
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 9,626
Yes, a Pentax shift lens. I owned one for three or four years while living in Chicago. 28mm, f/3.5, manual everything. Sharp as a tack, heavy as a gold brick. I have no use for it here, so did some exchanges for what I do use.
12-21-2007, 02:38 AM   #3
Senior Member
digitaldevo's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: PA, USA
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 154
An awesome lens is what it is, lol. I want to pick up a 80mm or 35mm Shift, preferably the 80mm and use it with Extension Tubes. They make the absolute best macro setups in the world!!!

P.S. They are also about the best lens you can get for architectural photography as well.
12-21-2007, 06:03 AM   #4
Inactive Account




Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Brisbane, QLD, AUS
Posts: 3,262
Ahem. While the above are very good statements, I don't really think they answer BJ's question.

A "tilt/shift lens" is a lens where the front element(s) can be tilted, ie, angled up or down, or left and right, or any combo thereof, independently of the rear lens element (and therefor the camera body and, of course, the image plane. That covers the "tilt."

The "shift" function is again a mechanical function, which allows the front elements to slide parallel to the image plane.

What this does is allow you to point a camera up at a building, say, and then tilt the front lens so that the vertical lines of the building remain parallel.

12-21-2007, 06:12 AM   #5
Pentaxian
Moderator Emeritus




Join Date: May 2007
Location: Edmonton Alberta, Canada
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 10,648
Tilt/shift lenses allow you to change the perspective. If you shoot a tall building or trees as examples the straight line will all converge at the top (come together inward). When you use the shift feature you can straighten the perspective so that the lines are straight and parallel. It allows you within some limits to change the centerline of the shot. So a tall building when shot from the ground has a centerline at eye level. You can move that up the building so it would appear you were shooting from a position half way up the building.

For macros they allow you to really control the DOF and perspective. They give you much more DOF than a conventional Macro lens. But you won't get the tight 1:1 macros without extension tubes etc.

When used in the tilt mode you can change the plane of the DOF. So if you shoot a landscape or macro with one of these lenses, you may have things in the close foreground and also the background you want in focus. It might not be possible even at f22 to get it all in focus. The normal lens and camera has everything in focus along a set plane parallel to the sensor/film plane. The tilt lens can let you adjust that plane to get much more in focus. A small amount of tilt can make a huge difference in how much is in focus and dramatically changes the focus plane between sensor and lens.

I found a DIY method a year or 2 ago on the net. If I can locate the link I'll post it later.
12-21-2007, 06:35 AM   #6
Forum Member




Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 90
There is a good example of TS lens usage:
A Really Big Show | The New York Times
12-21-2007, 06:49 AM   #7
Veteran Member
Buddha Jones's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Charlotte, NC
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,591
Original Poster
Thanks for the info, that is kind of like the Lensbabies 3G.
12-21-2007, 07:14 AM   #8
Ole
Administrator
Ole's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 3,896
Note that the Pentax is a shift lens only, not tilt, which makes it less useful than a shift and tilt lens. It can correct converging lines when you photograph a tall building but it cannot really be adjusted to control DOF.

12-21-2007, 08:50 AM   #9
Pentaxian
Moderator Emeritus




Join Date: May 2007
Location: Edmonton Alberta, Canada
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 10,648
That NYT video is interesting. There aren't many examples of tilt shots out there. Lots of shift pictures and many you don't even realize are done this way with cityscapes, trees etc. Personally I don't like the tilt versions he presented there much. Everything looks like a toy model instead of the real thing. We're used to conventional shots in the examples he posted and our eyes don't see things this way either. Although the surfing shots are pretty cool. But I've seen Tilt shots (and had a chance to borrow a lens about 15 years ago for a few days) doing more close up work and that does work well in certain set ups.
12-21-2007, 11:09 AM   #10
Inactive Account




Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: London
Posts: 1,067
Hi Buddha Jones

As no one one seems to have mentioned it thus far, the benefit of this Pentax 28mm Shift Lens will unfortunately be comprised if you attempt to use it in conjunction with your K10D camera, due to the nature of APS-C sensor in the K10D's body.
What this means is that the APS-C focal length magnification factor of x 1.5 (28 x 1.5 = 42mm) will (in conventional 35mm film terms) effectively convert a 28mm lens into a 42mm one when attached to a K10D DSLR body. Whereas it's original 28mm coverage (in conventional 35mm film terms) is ideal for photographing many architectural exteriors/interiors, a 42mm one is far less useful in most circumstances, as it's wide-angle benefits are eliminated. Unless Pentax eventually get around to manufacturing a full-frame 36 x 24 sensor DSLR (which seems highly unlikely in the forseeable future) then the usefulness of this shift-lens will be solely confined for use only with film cameras.

Best regards
Richard

Last edited by Confused; 12-21-2007 at 05:10 PM.
12-21-2007, 11:13 AM   #11
Pentaxian
Moderator Emeritus




Join Date: May 2007
Location: Edmonton Alberta, Canada
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 10,648
true Richard and that would make this lens very overpriced for it's limited uses. Basically it's an outdoor lens or for large church interiors etc.
12-21-2007, 02:08 PM   #12
Veteran Member
JCSullivan's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Windsor, Canada
Posts: 3,058
QuoteOriginally posted by Confused Quote
Hi Buddha Jones

As no one one seems to have mentioned it thus far, the benefit of this Pentax 28mm Shift Lens will unfortunately be comprised if you attempt to use it in conjunction with your K10D camera, due to the nature of APS-C sensor in the K10D's body.
What this means is that the APS-C focal length magnification factor of x 1.5 (28 x 1.5 = 42mm) will (in conventional 35mm film terms) effectively convert a 28mm lens into a 42mm one when attached to a K10D DSLR body. Whereas it's original 28mm coverage (in conventional 35mm film terms) is ideal for photographing many architectural exteriors/interiors, a 42mm one is far less useful in most circumstances, as it's wide-angle benefits are eliminated. Unless Pentax eventually get around to manufacturing a full-frame 36 x 24 sensor DSLR (which seems highly unlikely in the forseeable future) then the usefulness of this shift-lens will be solely confined for use with film cameras only.

Best regards
Richard

How right you are Richard. I bought this lense, a life-long dream, a couple of months ago without thinking of the magnification factor. When I went out there shooting I was totally disappointed and dejected.

I've dug-out my ME but haven't had the time to go out with it yet nor have I found the time to do some inside shots.
12-21-2007, 05:30 PM   #13
Inactive Account




Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: London
Posts: 1,067
Hi JCSullivan

It's probably of no consolation whatsoever, but that well-worn phrase 'caveat emptor' inevitably springs to mind at such moments. I genuinely feel for you in this situation because I often experience dreadful irritation, being unable to utilize my trusty Olympus shift lens with a digital SLR body. The frustration is mutual, I can assure you !

Best regards
Richard
12-25-2007, 02:56 PM   #14
Syb
Veteran Member
Syb's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Near Utrecht, Netherlands
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,224
Since this is a topic discussing the pros and cons of shift (/tilt) lenses, I have a thought to share. Actually, it is a question.

As far as I know, the tilt/shift lens is one more step closer to the "technical camera", or TC, (is that the correct word?), the large format equipment where really everything can be adjusted (except maybe for the weight).

My question is this: 24x36 film requires much smaller movements to make the ideal image, compared to the TC. Simply because the plane and the viewfinder are bigger, things are much easier to control.

Isn't that a problem with 24x36 cameras having this kind of lens? Too small viewfinders, too small buttons on too small a camera to really check what you are doing?

Just a question!
12-25-2007, 04:19 PM   #15
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
Canada_Rockies's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Sparwood, BC, Canada
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 9,626
QuoteOriginally posted by Syb Quote
Since this is a topic discussing the pros and cons of shift (/tilt) lenses, I have a thought to share. Actually, it is a question.

As far as I know, the tilt/shift lens is one more step closer to the "technical camera", or TC, (is that the correct word?), the large format equipment where really everything can be adjusted (except maybe for the weight).

My question is this: 24x36 film requires much smaller movements to make the ideal image, compared to the TC. Simply because the plane and the viewfinder are bigger, things are much easier to control.

Isn't that a problem with 24x36 cameras having this kind of lens? Too small viewfinders, too small buttons on too small a camera to really check what you are doing?

Just a question!
The viewfinder only sees the part that will be on the film/sensor. The shift requirements are much less, because the image circle is so much smaller. In short, you get to see exactly what will appear on the image.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
28mm, k-mount, lens, pentax, pentax lens, shift, slr lens
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
oh, what the heck.. DanLoc78 Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 38 09-09-2009 04:48 PM
Just for the heck of it. wildman Post Your Photos! 8 06-04-2009 05:07 AM
What the heck is this??? Workingdog Mini-Challenges, Games, and Photo Stories 1852 05-01-2009 11:54 AM
What the heck is that? Ole Post Your Photos! 3 02-01-2009 09:15 PM
A3 - what the heck is A3 anyway? doggydude Photographic Technique 16 12-18-2006 12:14 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:54 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top