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12-13-2011, 06:19 AM   #46
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QuoteOriginally posted by liukaitc Quote
actually..I like the look of 200mm a lot (135mm for aps-c)
but the 70mm (50mm for aps-c) look nice too..I mean really can not say which focal length look better....

Both are tremendous photos, nicely composed, but, maybe it's just my monitor, seems the 70mm is just a little crisper. I'm sure the couple was pleased with either of them, though. Great work!

12-13-2011, 09:27 AM   #47
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Assuming you are talking about sharpness, there's no way to really judge that based just on the posted image - far too small. Most of the detail has already been resized out of both. And besides, any difference in sharpness could just as easily be attributed to differences in where exactly the focus point was, what the DOF was, how steadily the camera was supported, etc. The image should only be considered as a way of visualizing the difference in perspective caused by the very different working distances required to get the same basic subject framing.
12-13-2011, 10:43 AM   #48
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Hi,
I see that most of us think about the same. I personally uptrebljavam for "classic" portrait of the Pentax 50 / 1.4; for street portrait using the Sigma 70-200 / 2.8. When I "sentimental mood" Install adapter M42 and Chinon lens 66 / 1,4; Helios 58 / 2 I am particularly happy because of the incredible Chinon "absorption" of color and low DOF.
Best regards, Velja
12-13-2011, 11:27 AM   #49
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QuoteOriginally posted by TOUGEFC Quote
The problem with using macro lenses is that their flat field sharpness isnt really desired for portrait, and will odften lack the "pop" of
a specialised portrait lens.
Quite true, but there's a mania for sharpness. The excuse is, "I can shoot it sharp and then soften it in PP -- I'd rather selectively remove detail than start with a less detailed image". Sharp images can pop if the lighting is right. But yes, ultrashap glass certainly gives a different look than do portrait lenses.

Cases in point: my two favorite headshot primes are a flatfield-sharp Vivitar-LU 75/3.5 enlarger lens on tubes, and a classic Jupiter-9 85/2 on a wide-flange no-infinity-focus M42-PK adapter (because infinity doesn't matter). I like the Vivitar for smooth faces and the Jupiter, with its soft thin-DOF romanticism, for not-so-smooth faces. And for best rendering of facial features I prefer various lenses around 75-80-85mm stopped-down to f/3.5-4, or a 100/4.5, if the background is distant enough. Super-thin DOF is romantic|dramatic; moderate DOF is realistic.

12-13-2011, 11:39 AM   #50
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QuoteOriginally posted by Drom Quote
Thank you everyone. Sorry I didn't specify. I am interested in having one that would be good for head shots. Most of the lenses I will collect will be for wildlife images, because that is my primary interest, but I want to have one lens that will be great for images of people.
For head shots I would recommend a longer than "normal" lens. This enforces a bigger distance between your subject and you camera and thus eliminates perspective distortion, which you unavoidably get, if you use a wide angle or standard lens for a head shot.

My preferred focal length is around 80mm even with APS-C. YOu don't usually need the sharpest lens for portraits. Just think, how generations of photographers and lens designers worked hard to produce good soft focus lenses! An old Imagon or Imagon-type lens would still be useful today. Pentax produced some soft focus lenses, which are very expensive today. The Russians make quite interesting 80mm lenses, which produce weired bokeh, that could prove highly useful for portraits.

All in all I think, getting the light right is much more important, than the lens!

Ben
12-13-2011, 01:00 PM   #51
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ben_Edict Quote
All in all I think, getting the light right is much more important, than the lens!
Quite right. My old Kodak guide to portraiture mentions lens focal lengths exactly twice; the rest of the book is about lighting, posing, makeup, backgrounds -- the important stuff.

But while were obsessing over lenses, let me also recommend (cheap) projector lenses on extension. Many of these use the ancient Petzval formula, the dominant portrait optics from maybe 1860-1920. Not super-fast; but the pop, WOW! And no iris blades to worry about -- shoot wide-open (at f/3.5-4.5) with a circular aperture.
12-13-2011, 02:59 PM   #52
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QuoteOriginally posted by RioRico Quote
Quite right. My old Kodak guide to portraiture mentions lens focal lengths exactly twice; the rest of the book is about lighting, posing, makeup, backgrounds -- the important stuff.

But while were obsessing over lenses, let me also recommend (cheap) projector lenses on extension. Many of these use the ancient Petzval formula, the dominant portrait optics from maybe 1860-1920. Not super-fast; but the pop, WOW! And no iris blades to worry about -- shoot wide-open (at f/3.5-4.5) with a circular aperture.
Old Petzvals are great. I am looking for one all the time - there are some really nice lenses among the myriads out there. Good idea.

Ben
12-14-2011, 04:50 AM   #53
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QuoteOriginally posted by Velja Quote
Hi,
...When I "sentimental mood" Install adapter M42 and Chinon lens 66 / 1,4; Helios 58 / 2 I am particularly happy because of the incredible Chinon "absorption" of color and low DOF.
Which lens is this? Chinon 66/1.4

12-14-2011, 05:15 AM   #54
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QuoteOriginally posted by yusuf Quote
Which lens is this? Chinon 66/1.4
Probably a finger-slip -- what was meant was likely 55/1.4.
12-14-2011, 05:39 AM   #55
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I have a Pentax-A 35-105 that I'm fond of for portraits. It's a very sharp lens.

Pentax-A 35-105mm F3.5 Reviews - A Zoom Lenses - Pentax Lens Reviews & Lens Database

Cheers,
Bobbo :-)
12-14-2011, 06:03 AM   #56
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QuoteOriginally posted by RioRico Quote
Other reasons to go with a shorter lens: Context shots, where background or surroundings complement the subject(s). Or for interesting effects, like shooting the subject and their reflection. Or sometimes that big nose demands exaggeration, eh?

Other reasons to go with a longer lens: To concentrate on just part of a face, not a full face. Or to exploit a distant background, especially if the lens gives good bokeh. Or sometimes the togger and the subject just aren't comfortable near each other.

Sometimes being close works with the subject, that's for sure.


But I think your main point, as it almost always is, is that what is most important is choosing the right tool for the job by knowing your equipment and what you are trying to accomplish.

For example, I'm having a ball playing with my recently CLA's M100/4 Macro for portraits. Is it the right tool for everything? No. Is is SHARP? Yup. The lens that I am finding I get more keepers from though is my K45-125/4. The portraits seem to PoP for with this lens and I have the advantage, in smaller spaces and crowds, of being able to adjust without using my feet.
12-14-2011, 09:12 AM   #57
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RioRico,
Thank you for me give a reason for "lapsus finger!
regards Velja
12-14-2011, 09:26 AM   #58
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I'd second that pentax A 35-105/3.5 zoom. If you have good light, you can achieve really good results... Well that goes for many other situations too. And it's quite afforable too. If you can find one.
12-14-2011, 10:34 AM   #59
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QuoteOriginally posted by Velja Quote
RioRico,
Thank you for me give a reason for "lapsus finger!
regards Velja
No problem!

QuoteOriginally posted by Docrwm Quote
Sometimes being close works with the subject, that's for sure.
That's exactly the example I was thinking of!
_________________________________________

About portrait zooms:

QuoteQuote:
The lens that I am finding I get more keepers from though is my K45-125/4. The portraits seem to PoP for with this lens and I have the advantage, in smaller spaces and crowds, of being able to adjust without using my feet.
QuoteOriginally posted by repaap Quote
I'd second that pentax A 35-105/3.5 zoom. If you have good light, you can achieve really good results... Well that goes for many other situations too. And it's quite afforable too. If you can find one.
And I've said that my favorite people-shooting zoom is an old M42 Sears-Tokina 55-135/3.5. These three, at f/3.5-4, aren't the fastest around; but IMHO superfast portraiture with superthin DOF is a specialty, not a mainstay.
_________________________________________

Someone mentioned photo-portraits as "bathroom mirror pictures" -- what you want to see in your portrait is (likely an idealization of) what you see in a mirror. That self-image probably has that soft blurry look only when you're hungover. The rest of the time, your head looks optically (if not stylistically) sharp. Tilt your head rakishly... imagine the lens favoring your profile... hope the lens doesn't break...

And that's why I prefer something around 75-80-85mm f/3.5-4-4.5 for headshots. Is subject isolation needed? Make the background distant or darkened. The DOF of that focal length and aperture set are just right for rendering features.

About 'pop' vs flatfield sharpness: Yes, macro and enlarger and reversed lenses *do* have edge-to-edge flatfield sharpness. And 'pop' is associated with (among other things) a somewhat curved subject field. I have a pervy project in mind: deflatten a lens. One of these year I'll diddle with the rear elements of a sacrificial lens, to try to curve the field a bit. Maybe one of the extras M50/2s... although I hear that the Helios-44 is easy to work with.
12-14-2011, 12:12 PM   #60
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DA*50~135mm - did anyone mention that one yet?
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