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03-05-2012, 10:25 AM   #1
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Lens for real estate photography

What would be a good lens choice for doing home interiors that won't cost an arm and a leg? The 18mm end of my Sigma 18-50 just doesn't get as wide as I'd like. Or are the low cost and ultra wide requirements mutually exclusive?

03-05-2012, 10:29 AM   #2
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QuoteOriginally posted by Workingdog Quote
Or are the low cost and ultra wide requirements mutually exclusive?
We have a winner!

You would probably be better off investing in some panoramic stitching software.
03-05-2012, 10:29 AM   #3
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<$500 Tamron 10-24, best combination of lower cost, good warranty, nice range, and better QA than Sigma.
03-05-2012, 10:31 AM   #4
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if you don't mind dealing with distortion and manual focus, check out the samyang/rokinon/bower/vivitar 14mm f/2.8. It's stupidly sharp and quite wide

03-05-2012, 10:46 AM   #5
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Yes, maybe the Samyang, but you would probably want to use software to fix the distortion. Also, maybe you could get an old manual lens (in m42 mount), but those rarely go wider than 18mm anyway. Or look into the Pentax 15mm f4, if its not too expensive.
03-05-2012, 11:25 AM   #6
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Does LR3 have the lens info on the Samyang 14?
03-05-2012, 12:18 PM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by Docrwm Quote
<$500 Tamron 10-24, best combination of lower cost, good warranty, nice range, and better QA than Sigma.
What he said. Exactly right. I've recently shot my second residence, a tiny old adobe of 800 square feet, and the Tamron 10-24 even works in rooms only 6 feet wide. I've also used it in larger interiors and exteriors. Stop down a little for maximum DOF.
03-05-2012, 12:47 PM   #8
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Thanks folks. I'll have a look at the Tammy.

03-05-2012, 01:17 PM   #9
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Dont know if this helps but its a shot i took last month at 10mm with the Pentax 10-17mm. I believe its advertised as 180degree span on diagonal. Point level with the horizon and it stays straight with only the off-center window frames distorting. I could square it up but then it would be no wider than my rectiliner da15mm lens. This room is about 10' in diameter.

If you cant work with a fisheye, I would think the bang for the buck might be the da16-45 if 16mm is wide enough. Very affordable and lots of used copies around. Noticebly wider than 18mm.

03-05-2012, 01:18 PM   #10
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I've used the DA 16-45 for shooting the interiors of some of the houses I've built and it worked pretty good actually. It's no 10mm or 14mm but it is pretty affordable.
Here's a few of mine from the 16-45mm







03-05-2012, 01:20 PM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by Na Horuk Quote
Yes, maybe the Samyang, but you would probably want to use software to fix the distortion. Also, maybe you could get an old manual lens (in m42 mount), but those rarely go wider than 18mm anyway. Or look into the Pentax 15mm f4, if its not too expensive.
I have a 15mm f4, which I love, but for real estate photography, I want something wider. This is spoken as someone looking at houses.
03-05-2012, 01:29 PM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by imtheguy Quote
Dont know if this helps but its a shot i took last month at 10mm with the Pentax 10-17mm. I believe its advertised as 180degree span on diagonal.
The DA10-17 (the lens that drove me to Pentax) is great, but rather specialized, and IMHO isn't really appropriate for most real-estate photography. It's fine for geodesic domes and yurts, and for artsy shots, but I'd be leery of listings illustrated solely by fisheye shots.
03-05-2012, 03:30 PM   #13
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I used the fisheye to take interior pictures of our house in San Antonio. The "professional guy" came out and used a Sigma 10-20mm to do a virtual tour of the house. Ended up using my pictures for the stills and his for the virtual tour.
The 10-17 worked great but if I were doing real estate photos every day, I would look at either the Sigma or the Tamron.
03-05-2012, 03:39 PM   #14
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Here are a few from the real estate ad.
This is what you get with the 10-17mm
Attached Images
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03-05-2012, 06:12 PM   #15
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I have both the Tamron 10-24 and Sigma 8-16 that I use for real estate. I have to say I really like the Tamron, except that I have to turn off the auto-focus because mine essentially worthless. Manual focusing isn't a big deal to me though. The distortion isn't as bad as the 10-17 shown above. Lightroom has a profile to correct the distortion as a RAW file, so that isn't a big deal either. I like that the Sigma gets down to 8 mm, and the auto focus actually works most of the time, but when used on a Pentax, anything shot between 8 and 10 mm is not recorded in the correct place in the EXIF data to be able to apply the lens correction profile in Lightroom. It requires extra steps to correct the distortion. They each have their advantages and disadvantages, but considering the cost and extra effort involved with going below 10mm, I like the Tamron.
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