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03-08-2012, 02:57 AM   #1
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Bokeh with 18-55 wr starter-kit

Hi guys,

I was wondering if the starterkit is good enough for good bokehs.
I'm a beginner and would love to get these wonderful effects on my photos.
So is there any simple how-to?

Many thanks in advance.

-golive

03-08-2012, 03:02 AM   #2
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Use the lens wide open with an aperture of around f5.6 this should give you a nice blurred background with any highlights showing up nicely.
03-08-2012, 03:05 AM   #3
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Try to use it at 55mm too and focus closer to the object and try to place the background further away
03-08-2012, 03:09 AM   #4
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You can indeed isolate a subject causing the fore/back-ground areas to become out of focus with the 18-55mm kit...
Creating bokeh is about working with distance in conjuction with the lens used...

03-08-2012, 05:52 AM   #5
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As above, set it at 55mm, wide open at f/5.6 and get close. I personally love the bokeh of the 18-55 WR, it's a fantastic little lens.
03-08-2012, 05:53 AM   #6
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Ok, thank you.
You mean like that?

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03-08-2012, 06:06 AM   #7
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Yup! Getting close is the most important thing really, but a wide aperture really helps, and having the background as far away as possible helps too. The bigger the distance between the subject and background, and the smaller the distance between the camera and the subject the better.

Be careful with focus though, because you'll have a VERY thin DoF at the 18-55's closest focus distance, and you want to make sure your subejct is as sharp as possible to make the bokeh stand out even more.
03-08-2012, 09:15 AM   #8
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Good advice above. Bokeh is the quality of OOF (out-of-focus) areas in an image. Factors that affect bokeh include:

* a lens' optics and iris (number and shape of blades)
* the aperture setting and thus the DOF thickness
* lens-to-subject and subject-to-background distances
* how the sharp subject and the OOF areas are lit

Besides being careful about distances and lighting, a simple trick that can have great effect on DOF and bokeh is to just put a screw-on +1 dioptre close-up adapter onto your kit lens. At its long end (55mm) the kit lens' aperture is only f/5.6, not real fast. Tighter apertures give thicker DOF. But with a +1dpt optic on the lens, the focus range is just 20-40in / 50-100cm, with rather thin DOF.

This trick is useful for really isolating close subjects from their surroundings, but is no good for further subjects. A +0.5dpt optic would be even more useful, with a greater focus range; those are rate and costly, alas. But however you get thin DOF, it serves to exaggerate the lens' bokeh, as long as you've nailed the subject focus.

03-08-2012, 10:46 AM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by golive Quote
Ok, thank you.
You mean like that?

------...........................-------.....--------
-BG-...........................-OBJ-.....-CAM-
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A fellow visual learner, I love it
03-08-2012, 04:38 PM   #10
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Some 18-55 bokeh:

55mm, f/8, at or near minimum focus distance:


31mm, f/4 (not quite so close this time):
03-09-2012, 02:48 PM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by baro-nite Quote
Some 18-55 bokeh:

55mm, f/8, at or near minimum focus distance:


31mm, f/4 (not quite so close this time):
Awesome shots - shows us what can be done with inexpensive equipment when you know what the hell you are doing!
03-09-2012, 03:11 PM   #12
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Well can't bokeh be done with any lens? It's just a style. A faster lens will make it much easier to get the effect but essentially any lens can produce it.
03-09-2012, 05:21 PM   #13
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It is a cheap and nasty kit zoom lens. It can't do bokeh at any focal length





The long end (55mm) and wide open is pretty good, as is the other end (18mm) if you get close to your main subject.
The mid range is not bad either. Just set the camera to the P (program) mode, select the one with the fuzzy mountain and shoot

Last edited by kh1234567890; 03-09-2012 at 05:29 PM.
03-09-2012, 07:53 PM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by epqwerty Quote
Well can't bokeh be done with any lens? It's just a style. A faster lens will make it much easier to get the effect but essentially any lens can produce it.
Look back at my post #8 here. Bokeh is not a style; it's the quality of OOF (out-of-focus) areas in an image. A shot with thick DOF will have little OOF content, so the bokeh won't be noticeable. Any technique that thins DOF will make the bokeh more visible. Once again, here are the guidelines for DOF:
For thinner DOF, use a longer focal length and/or a wider|faster aperture and/or a further lens-to-subject distance.

For thicker DOF, use a shorter focal length and/or a tighter|slower aperture and/or a closer lens-to-subject distance.
The visible bokeh can be characterized as smooth|creamy, or nervous|jittery, or swirly, or geometric, or donut (with mirror lenses), etc. I'm a perv so I like smooth bokeh with complex images and jagged, nervous bokeh with bland, smooth subjects.
03-09-2012, 08:32 PM   #15
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Here's an example of what can be done with the nice cheap kit lens!



That was taken back when I was just learning about using something besides a P&S, and in fact was withing weeks of getting my first DSLR! It's the 18-55 lens that people seem to love to hate on, but to tell the truth out wandering around it is quite adequate, and as you can see, bokeh can be had.
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