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04-26-2012, 06:48 AM   #16
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I'd go with the 18-55. It's a pretty good little lens & unless you're flying at night, it will be plenty fast enough with your K-r. If the helicopter vibrates a lot, I'd try to use a fast shutter speed of 1000th of a second or faster to mitigate that. With the excellent high ISO performance of the K-r, you should have no trouble if you set your ISO to 800 or so. (in daylight.)

Have fun!
Bobbo :-)

04-26-2012, 07:03 AM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by slackercruster Quote
Sure, good lens as well. You wont go wrong with either lens.

Just be set to shoot, the photo ops go by too quick to screw around. If your hiring a copter you can direct the shoot. If on a siteseeing flight you got to get the shot when you can. If you have a choice of seats, pick the one with the cleanest window to shoot through.

Good luck...and post the shots when you get a chance.
I will be on a sightseeing flight. Half an hour only, then I'm onto the beach and sand
04-26-2012, 07:53 AM   #18
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What ever lens you choose be sure to add a CP filter to it. If it is a cloudy day you won't need it but if it's sunny or partially sunny, you will definitely need it to cut water surface glare and reflections.

NaCl(CP's are always in my bag)H2O
04-26-2012, 08:43 AM   #19
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+1 for the CP filter, a fast lens wont be as important. Your 18-55 should be ideal as its usually very bright and sunny there at that time of year . Be careful of curved window and windscreen surfaces in the helicopter they create flare and distortions, open windows are much better.

04-26-2012, 09:05 AM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by G and T Quote
+1 for the CP filter, a fast lens wont be as important. Your 18-55 should be ideal as its usually very bright and sunny there at that time of year . Be careful of curved window and windscreen surfaces in the helicopter they create flare and distortions, open windows are much better.
I actually do own a CP filter for the kit lens but am not sure if I know how to use it (only used it once and it was a disaster.) What about a lens hood? I got a hood from eBay for a few bucks but have never used it
04-26-2012, 05:46 PM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by slackercruster Quote
Sure, good lens as well. You wont go wrong with either lens.

Just be set to shoot, the photo ops go by too quick to screw around. If your hiring a copter you can direct the shoot. If on a siteseeing flight you got to get the shot when you can. If you have a choice of seats, pick the one with the cleanest window to shoot through.

Good luck...and post the shots when you get a chance.
I decided on a non HSM OS version of the Sigma 17-70, see how it goes
04-26-2012, 09:38 PM   #22
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Now I'm wondering which lens I shall take for the ocean shafting boat ride... It will be bumpy as hell but there will be lots of wildlife. However my lenses aren't water-proof except for the DA*s..
04-27-2012, 04:56 AM   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by Medium FormatPro Quote
So if you could please **turn off** the SR settings in any Pentax camera. The vibration of most small aircraft is enough to actually damage the mechanism (the SR feature-mechanics).
I don't see how turning it on or off will change the fact that vibrations might affect it or not. When turned off, there's no lock or anything on it.

QuoteOriginally posted by Mace Quote
Take a fast lens. f5.6 might not be fast enough for sharp pictures.
It should be plenty with all the light coming from the Sun.

QuoteOriginally posted by junototoro Quote
I was thinking about 17-70 Sigma... Which is better? Pentax f/4 or Sigma 2.8/4.5 ?
There's a review coming about this soon

QuoteOriginally posted by NaClH2O Quote
What ever lens you choose be sure to add a CP filter to it.
QuoteOriginally posted by junototoro Quote
I actually do own a CP filter for the kit lens but am not sure if I know how to use it (only used it once and it was a disaster.)
That's great advice, I'm sorry I forgot about it To use the CP, just look through your viewfinder. In this case, you want to use it to reduce the reflections from the windows, so just turn the CP until the reflections are gone or at least minimized.

04-27-2012, 08:30 AM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by Medium FormatPro Quote
So if you could please **turn off** the SR settings in any Pentax camera. The vibration of most small aircraft is enough to actually damage the mechanism (the SR feature-mechanics). Sure there is always a chance that it will not be effetecd, but why take the gamble??
Pure rubbish and unfounded conjecture.
I have a commercial photographer friend who regularly shoots paid aerial shots of buildings and ships with Nikon cameras with VR lenses with no issues at all. I have shot with my Pentax cameras from a few planes and choppers and there was no problems with the SR mechanism at all. So I can tell report from first hand experience there is no reason not to use SR when shooting aerial shots and there is no damage done to the camera's SR mechanism.
04-27-2012, 08:34 AM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by creampuff Quote
Pure rubbish and unfounded conjecture.
I have a commercial photographer friend who regularly shoots aerial shots of buildings and ships with Nikon cameras with VR lenses with no issues at all. I have shot with my Pentax cameras from a few planes and choppers and there was no problems with the SR mechanism at all. So I can tell report from first hand experience there is no reason not to use SR when shooting aerial shots and there is no damage done to the camera's SR mechanism.
Thank you!

Now I really need to practice using a polarizer

Can I screw the polarizer on top of my UV filter?

I've used the CPL once before when I was very new to my camera and had no idea what it was about, and the dark vignetting around the edges was just disastrous
04-27-2012, 08:51 AM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by junototoro Quote
Thank you!

Now I really need to practice using a polarizer

Can I screw the polarizer on top of my UV filter?

I've used the CPL once before when I was very new to my camera and had no idea what it was about, and the dark vignetting around the edges was just disastrous
Ditch that UV filter if you're using a polarizing filter. In real life, there is little or no time to use a polarizer because even if you're shooting any bodies of water from the air, your relative position changes so rapidly that you'll be spending most of your time framing and shooting as quickly as possible than fiddling with that polarizer. Set your camera to an auto mode such as aperture or shutter priority and adjust exposure quickly by setting an e-dial to quickly adjust exposure compensation and shoot at a high fps.
04-27-2012, 08:55 AM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by creampuff Quote
Ditch that UV filter if you're using a polarizing filter. In real life, there is little or no time to use a polarizer because even if you're shooting any bodies of water from the air, your relative position changes so rapidly that you'll be spending most of your time framing and shooting as quickly as possible than fiddling with that polarizer. Set your camera to an auto mode such as aperture or shutter priority and adjust exposure quickly by setting an e-dial to quickly adjust exposure compensation and shoot at a high fps.
I thought it would be extremely hard. So should I just forget about using the CPL in the air and save it for the ground then?? Or on the boat.

Also got another question popping up in my head: Would it be difficult to shoot in the helicopter with my sunglasses on? I think it's very hard to judge the exposure with sunglasses but my eyes are pretty bad so I have to wear either glasses or prescription sunglasses.
04-27-2012, 02:43 PM   #28
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QuoteOriginally posted by junototoro Quote
Also got another question popping up in my head: Would it be difficult to shoot in the helicopter with my sunglasses on
I dont see this as being a problem, unless you have poor eye sight?
I shot with sunglasses on almost always when shooting outside.
04-27-2012, 04:36 PM   #29
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QuoteOriginally posted by TOUGEFC Quote
I dont see this as being a problem, unless you have poor eye sight?
I shot with sunglasses on almost always when shooting outside.
I meant prescription sunglasses. I'm just worried about not getting the exposure right
04-27-2012, 11:23 PM   #30
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I've never been in a helicopter, but i took a picture of this Navy one as it checked us out while i was riding in a moving, shaking, whale-spotting tourist boat on Puget Sound. Shutter 1/1000s, iso 400, F4.5, DA*300. If you can use a fast shutter speed like this, you don't need SR. I agree that the SR is not in any danger, but the problem with SR is that it takes a full 2 sec for SR to re-establish itself after you move it to a new direction. Members complain about random OOF shots with K5, but its more likely due to people not waiting till the SR hand shows up in the viewfinder. Actually, you're going to have a lot to shoot at, why waste time on SR when you really ought to be moving your camera around rapidly and shooting anything that looks like it might be good. Turn your SR off is my advice and keep your speed up to 1/1000 or faster. (there was a UV filter on the lens but not polarizer)


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