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06-25-2012, 06:05 AM   #76
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QuoteOriginally posted by lytrytyr Quote
AF may require a lighter assembly to be moved when focusing,
which may lead the designers to cut weight and thereby reduce the quality.
Aah, thanks, makes sense.

I had a Minolta 7000AF back in the 90s and the 4/80-200 and 1.7/50 I had with it were of pretty good build quality. But damn, the AF was so slow.

06-25-2012, 06:11 AM   #77
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The lightness of the DA Limiteds doesn't just make them very portable,
it also makes their AF very fast by Pentax standards.
The tradeoff implied by the narrow maximum apertures (slow lens)
has the advantage that the build quality isn't compromised.
06-25-2012, 06:20 AM   #78
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QuoteOriginally posted by lytrytyr Quote
For static photography, I would agree with you.
But for fast action under rapidly changing light conditions,
like an animal running over ground with patchy shadows,
the green button is too slow.
Perhaps in your example, but that's not my experience. I volunteer for a kids organization and part of what I do is take pictures for the events. I take a lot of candid shots of kids running around in changing lighting conditions, and usually set the exposure first then I'm usually fine. I do bring some new gear that has wonderful build quality (77ltd for example), but shut the AF off as it's too slow.
06-25-2012, 06:28 AM   #79
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I do the same (MF, fixed exposure) for that kind of event shooting,
when the variations in light levels are not so severe.
But the fixed exposure does not work
when the variations are more than a couple of EVs.

06-25-2012, 07:10 AM   #80
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QuoteQuote:
Given the popularity of many legacy lenses my experience and research would indicate that many old lenses are at least as good as their modern compatriots. but I wondered what peoples actual experience was?
I’m late to this thread but find myself in agreement with much that has already been written. Kerrowdown, a working professional photographer and legacy lens user, writes:


“Why, well because I've got them and that they still produce today, the images that I need to get the job done. If that changes in the future for whatever reason, I'll change my equipment accordingly.

Perhaps rather simplistically put, when people are looking at my work they never question how old the lens is or what it's made from or even what camera system has been used.

So I don't get too involved in the whys and wherefores, for me it's all about the final image and getting paid for said image. ”

And hey, as a bonus, if we do ever get a FF camera, I'm ahead of the game.

This makes a lot of sense to me as a legacy lens user. I have a lot of old lenses and they do the job I want them to do. While my old M and K series glass may lack AF and AE they still work just fine. My older zooms don’t match up to newer models but all of my old primes still work very well indeed. Better still I already own them and don’t need to buy the latest and greatest model although I admit to the temptation. The bottom line is its all about the images we make with the gear we have. In the right hands even the most pedestrian lens can produce a quality photo. No amount of money spent on equipment can compensate for a lack of skill and vision as I have proved on many occasions in both photography and golf. As for working with an older lens without AF or AE it is admittedly not everyone’s cup of tea. Personally, I like the challenge and while I miss a lot of shots every now and then things come together. When they do I like the fact I had something to do with the product beyond just pointing and shooting.


Tom G
06-25-2012, 10:40 PM   #81
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QuoteOriginally posted by lytrytyr Quote
But for fast action under rapidly changing light conditions, like an animal running over ground with patchy shadows, the green button is too slow.
That is a great point. I don't shoot that type of subject, but I can absolutely see why the "A" setting would be helpful for that.
06-26-2012, 02:04 PM   #82
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QuoteOriginally posted by mano Quote
Now that reminds me of a friend of mine who originally bought a Pentax when he saw the pictures I produced with my K200 and soon started complaining about the AF choosing the wrong objects, SR not working whenever he got a blurred image etc. He later switched to Canon because he had seen that Canon's SR was able to produce a sharp picture even when being swirled around your head on some Youtube video... since he got the new camera he is mostly silent concerning the topic, I really wonder why.

Your post made think about his first SLR being a Canon EOS while I started with grandpa's old Praktica. Maybe that explains our different approaches to photography?
I get part of your point -- photographers take pictures, and cameras are tools for doing so. If someone gets the same kind of camera that a good photographer uses, that someone will not automatically become good photographer. I agree with this. However, I am not sure how to interpret "... since he got the new camera he is mostly silent concerning the topic ..." -- does that mean that he preferred the Canon or that he was disappointed with it too?
06-26-2012, 03:19 PM   #83
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I just posted this in a different thread, but realize that it may suit well here: Manual Focusing with AF Camera Systems. Even though it does not have to do with the IQ of old lenses per se, understanding how modern D-SLR:s are different from classic SLR:s when manual focusing lenses could be good to know.

06-27-2012, 03:25 PM   #84
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QuoteOriginally posted by fuent104 Quote
For me, not having an "A" setting for aperture is such a small matter, that I would consider it only the slightest of inconveniences. I have seen plenty of posts in which a person says they wouldn't want a lens because it doesn't have an "A" setting. I feel like they are saying this simply because they haven't tried using such lenses. I can't imagine people using such lenses and deciding that they were so difficult to use that they would rather not own the lens.
Bear in mind that exposure automation is not the only thing A lenses bring. They also allow the use of some fancy features like remote flash. I found it quite frustrating when I discovered my M 50 f/1.7 (my only 50-ish prime at the time) was useless with my planned flash setup at a portrait shoot.

I still have more K/M and m42 lenses than AF, though.
06-27-2012, 03:38 PM   #85
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QuoteOriginally posted by nono Quote
Bear in mind that exposure automation is not the only thing A lenses bring. They also allow the use of some fancy features like remote flash. I found it quite frustrating when I discovered my M 50 f/1.7 (my only 50-ish prime at the time) was useless with my planned flash setup at a portrait shoot.

I still have more K/M and m42 lenses than AF, though.
This is something I wish Pentax did not change on the flagship cameras, dual flash systems TTL and P-TTL
10-26-2013, 06:44 AM   #86
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QuoteOriginally posted by iangreenhalgh Quote
If manufacturers put all the latest techniques into making prime lenses then they would no doubt be better than old ones, but comparing a modern zoom to an old prime, the prime will win in 99% of cases.
Quick note on this: a few days ago I was shooting a short interview with a friend. He had a Canon 7d with a new zoom, and I was sort of playing around with a second camera, a k1 on a tripod, seeing what would happen with an old sears 135mm (I've seen a few of these, which are inconsistent, but this one has been great with stills). When we synched the video, we found that my sears, which was way farther away than the Canon lens (I was looking for a close-up with a shallow depth of field), was much, much sharper than the new lens. Not even close.

The Canon operator was all auto. I was all manual, using focus peaking and, hmm, I don't know what it's called, that close-up function that punches you right in for focus.
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