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09-06-2012, 01:53 PM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by littledrawe Quote
I've been through this and the options get very few when you get into this territory.
agree, few and none
QuoteQuote:
There are two bags from lowepro that should do the job the lens trekker pro which I just bought a used version of the first one and it is great for me. I think the second version is a little longer. Then they have the pro trekker which is sized for a 600 as well and allows you to carry some extra gear. I have some different inserts that I can throw into the lens trekker for carrying extra lens if I want to take more with me and then there are several daisy chains on the outside for adding extra gear.
I think Kata has a long lens backpack and the kinesis gear is pretty good. I think for this kind of thing you really need good shoulder straps and a sturdy waistbelt.
i would second this point. my phototrekker is the only lowepro pack i have that lets me move the back up and down on my torso, to get the correct relationship between shoulder straps, pack, waste belt, and chest strap. I have a really good hiking pack as well with internal frame and fully adjustable harness as well, and it will be one of these two that I use to pack the 200-500/5.6 plus other gear
QuoteQuote:
Kinesis has the backpack platform that you can add some of thier long lens cases too and that might work for you but it is pretty pricey when you start adding it up.1
Then there are the DIY options. I have tried a baseball bat equipment bag, a wide mouth tool bag from lowes or homedepot(added some upholstery craft store foam to both for the padding), there are external frame packs without the bag that you can try lashing things to. But in the end for me I am planning on sticking with the lens trekker for the cost and ease of use since it was made for this type of application I don't have to do as much work to get it ready and save the cost of modifying some of the DIY options.

Its been great to get out and hike and see what I can find, it gets old driving around and hoping you come across something close to the road. Found this guy out on my second hike with the lens trekker.
nice shot

09-06-2012, 01:58 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by Lowell Goudge Quote
I think of a really big lens as a wait for them to come to you lens,
You could be waiting a long time, I think you need to get out to where the beasts frequent and for me a hike is the way to go, too many people and the animals stay out of the way.

Lowepro - Pro Trekker 600 AW
Lowepro - Lens Trekker 600 AW II
Kata TLB-600 PL Telephoto Lens Backpack (Black) KT PL-TLB-600
Kelty Cache Hauler (Frame Only) Camouflage Backpack
09-06-2012, 02:07 PM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by littledrawe Quote
You could be waiting a long time, I think you need to get out to where the beasts frequent and for me a hike is the way to go, too many people and the animals stay out of the way.

Lowepro - Pro Trekker 600 AW
Lowepro - Lens Trekker 600 AW II
Kata TLB-600 PL Telephoto Lens Backpack (Black) KT PL-TLB-600
Kelty Cache Hauler (Frame Only) Camouflage Backpack
what I really meant was that you hike somewhere strategic, where subject knowledge and conditions suggest the subject will appear and then wait, as opposed to "stalking" with a lighter, but slower lens you can hand hold.
09-06-2012, 03:21 PM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by Lowell Goudge Quote
what I really meant was that you hike somewhere strategic, where subject knowledge and conditions suggest the subject will appear and then wait, as opposed to "stalking" with a lighter, but slower lens you can hand hold.
Well then I agree with you there.

09-08-2012, 10:33 PM   #20
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I have a a LowePro Pro Trekker, works fine with my 400 f4.

After a bit of experimentation, for carrying the darn thing get a 1/2" thick Arca-Swiss plate, something like this one. You will need the length, to balance the lens with a K5 requires at least a 5" mounting plate.

6 inch long 5/8 thick rail with spirit level and two slots [G15-60] - $55.00 : Hejnar Photo Store, Serving Your Professional Photography Needs

It has a 1/4" female thread on the end. A Black Rapid eye screws into it, giving a secure mount for the strap. I carry the lens with monopod or light tripod with this setup. Works well. I use a Jobu gimbal on either.



It is a great lens, very sharp. It works reasonably well with the 140F tele converter giving a 560 5.6, or a taste of what is to come. You need a pretty good platform to get decent shots at that length.

This is an earlier iteration with a 300 f2.8 on the gimbal. I used a lace to hang the strap, worked ok. I needed a longer plate for the 400 f4 in any case, so I picked up one that would work.


Last edited by derekkite; 09-08-2012 at 10:39 PM.
09-09-2012, 05:30 AM   #21
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One thing many overlook are the lens mounted strap hooks. I use an old camera strap in these for over the shoulder hanging my 200-500/5.6 for short treks. Same idea as screwing into the 1/2 inch lens plate.
09-09-2012, 10:19 PM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by atekant Quote
Have a look at Deuter backpacks - those people know how to make heavy items carried on your back easy. Especially the Alpine series, which have various methods to attach long items like skis and poles, in our case tripods to the outside.

Also, depending on where in the world you are hiking, I do not recommend carrying long metal objects on their own over your shoulder - you know, places like Gaza, Iraq, US border states...
I'll chime in for the Deuter packs also. I purchased one earlier this year. My use has been limited so far but I can say with the little I've used it, It's the finest backpack I've owned to this point. It's easy to strap a tripod to the outside as well as poles, snowshoes, etc. It's very adjustable for people of different heights also. I'm an over 60 hiker with some back issues and I'm very fussy and particular about my backpacks. The price was reasonable too.
09-10-2012, 10:43 AM   #23
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I'd suggest looking at the Cotton Carrier. I used to regularly carry my K-7 with FA* 300 f2.8 +TC on the vest mount and K-5 with either my FA* 300 f4.5 or Sigma EX 180 f3.5 with TCs on the holster mounted on the vest. The cameras don't swing or bounce, the vest distributes the weight incredibly well, and either camera can be deployed quickly. Pricey and geeky looking, but I easily got over that once I tried it. I've tried just about everything, and this is easily the best way to carry a big tele IMO. I currently own the original Cotton Carrier 2 camera system and their belt system with the lens bag. It's easily the best way to carry a big lens like the Tamron 400/4, especially if you want easy and quick access to the camera/lens. The biggest advantage over other carry systems is that the camera/lens doesn't knock against me when I walk, and doesn't swing around when I bend down or turn around -- probably my biggest objections to any strap rig.

Cotton Carrier CAMERA VEST for 1 Camera

Digital Imaging Accessory Review: Cotton Carrier Camera Systems

Scott

09-11-2012, 07:36 AM   #24
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Cotton Carriers are great. I have one but carrying a big heavy long lens for a long period attached to the camera will become tiring rather quickly. When I'm hiking and skiing, I will normally have a wide angle or "normal" lens on the camera. My long glass, if I brought it, will be in my backpack until I use it. That said, I still recommend the Cotton Carrier. It keeps your camera close and handy, you can climb with it and is sturdy enough to handle long glass if you choose carry your gear this way. IMO, it's the best way to keep your camera handy while cross country skiing or kayaking. With long glass like the 400mm lens mentioned, the optional tripod adapter is a necessary item.
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