Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
01-24-2013, 04:42 PM   #16
Site Supporter
disco_owner's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Sydney
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,608
Original Poster
I've just spend a few minutes and carefully read all your responses ,
From your feedback so far,

I'll be taking the following lenses along on this trek

1. Da 18-135 (general purpose , all rounder )

2. Da15

3. FA31

4. Smc A-50 1.4

5. Tamron 90 macro (light weight and sharp ) don't own the Pentax DFA 100

this Leaves the 70-300 ( reasonably light and will allow me to reach the peak of some of the mountains. If I was to take along this lens ,

Another lens that I just thought of is the sigma 10-20 3.5
For really wide landscapes . What are your thoughts

01-26-2013, 01:58 PM   #17
Pentaxian




Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Western Canada
Posts: 3,835
QuoteOriginally posted by disco_owner Quote
I've just spend a few minutes and carefully read all your responses ,
From your feedback so far,

I'll be taking the following lenses along on this trek

1. Da 18-135 (general purpose , all rounder )

2. Da15

3. FA31

4. Smc A-50 1.4

5. Tamron 90 macro (light weight and sharp ) don't own the Pentax DFA 100

this Leaves the 70-300 ( reasonably light and will allow me to reach the peak of some of the mountains. If I was to take along this lens ,

Another lens that I just thought of is the sigma 10-20 3.5
For really wide landscapes . What are your thoughts
I have both a Pentax 50mm F1.4 normal and a Pentax 50mm F 2.8 Macro. If it's in the budget the 50 Macro maybe able to do both jobs...unless you feel you need the F 1.4 over the F 2.8 for low light.

How rugged is the Sigma 10-20 ?

Also what kind of bag do you plan to use...something well padded, easy to carry and high quality I would think. The last thing you would want is to have zipper split when you are carry up the Katmandu.

Last edited by lesmore49; 01-26-2013 at 02:22 PM.
01-26-2013, 07:08 PM   #18
Site Supporter
disco_owner's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Sydney
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,608
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by Docrwm Quote
The 18-135 is an excellent choice because of the WR and general versatility. The 15 Ltd is such a strong landscape lens that I can't imagine owning one and not taking on such a trip.

Power source? How do you plan to charge all those batteries?

Plenty of plastic baggies for camera and lenses to handle temp/humidity changes and weather generally.
I'm not sure , I haven't really put too much thought behind the power source yet , I'm taking 4 x LI90 batteries with me plus a few AA for the Grip. I'm also taking 2 chargers with me for a quick top up if we do happen to find a Power source?

QuoteOriginally posted by Na Horuk Quote
Wow, sounds very interesting. Will you need WR lenses?
Also, those mountains are pretty huge, you might need a tele lens and not a wide angle, since a wide angle would just capture.. too much.
Sounds like a very interesting voyage, though. I hope you upload some photos here, when you safely return
apparently from what I've been told March is expected to be wet and there will be lots of showers / rain , so yeah I will need a lens with WR. and so 18-135 will be up to the task.
I'll definitely be uploading plenty of landscape shots with Da15 , FA31 on K5 IIs for everyone's Viewing enjoyment, without pictures it didn't happen , isn't that the Forum Rule !!!


QuoteOriginally posted by jbuck92 Quote
I have to say, I'm very jealous of you and your other photog friends! My girlfriend and I have been really wanting to do some hiking photography but haven't had a chance nor the means to get into it at this point in our life.

As far as a lightweight kit would go, I think Lytrytyr hit the nail on the head. I think the DA 15 ltd is a must have on the trip. Light weight, awesome lens for landscapes. That's a nobrainer. I don't know if you were wanting to buy any lens to take on the trip, but if you were, you could always go with the DA 15/40/70 combo for super lightweight, and then throw in the DFA 100 for a bit longer reach and macro capability if you need it. If you don't care about macro, then you could keep the 18-135 instead for WR when the weather is bad.

If you don't bring the DFA 100, that leaves you the DA 15/40/70 plus the 18-135 zoom. Total weight would be a mere 1.92 pounds for your trip! Not too shabby for a 3 week hiking trip.
seeing I don't have the Da40 or the Da70 for a Lightweight Limited lens Kit , I think i'd still getaway with 15 and 31 and 50A , I could take the Sigma 85mm 1.4 but that is a heavy lens.


QuoteOriginally posted by lesmore49 Quote
I have both a Pentax 50mm F1.4 normal and a Pentax 50mm F 2.8 Macro. If it's in the budget the 50 Macro maybe able to do both jobs...unless you feel you need the F 1.4 over the F 2.8 for low light.

How rugged is the Sigma 10-20 ?

Also what kind of bag do you plan to use...something well padded, easy to carry and high quality I would think. The last thing you would want is to have zipper split when you are carry up the Katmandu.
Les ,I'm taking a Lowpro nature Trekker backpack carrying all my lenses and Tripod and batteries and I'll also have a Holster bag for changing lenses.

The Sigma 10-20 is not a Rugged lens by any means , none of my lense are , the Only lens I trust will Perform and be up to the Task wheather wise is my Da18-135 WR , I've been in pouring rain with this lens and K5 and no problem, If wheather gets too rough I'll switch lenses over to the Da18-135.
01-28-2013, 12:40 PM - 1 Like   #19
Site Supporter
cyberjunkie's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Bologna, Amsterdam, Chiang Mai
Posts: 270
QuoteOriginally posted by disco_owner Quote

I'll be taking the following lenses along on this trek

.......

5. Tamron 90 macro (light weight and sharp ) don't own the Pentax DFA 100

Another lens that I just thought of is the sigma 10-20 3.5
For really wide landscapes . What are your thoughts
The Tamron 90mm Macro is the last lens i bought for my Pentax cameras.
It is the second version of the manual focus type.
Fortunately it came with an Adaptall P-KA adapter, which allows to use it with any exposure mode.
I owned the first version, the heavy, cylindrical one with rubber focusing ring, but i sold it ages ago.
It is a perfect lens for shooting flowers, small animals, particulars, and even sharp portraits.
It will be VERY useful both during your treck, and when you'll get back to Katmandu.

A (very) wide lens will be more useful in the streets of Katmandu, than for mountain landscapes.
If you don't shoot panoramas, you'll find that going too wide will produce insignificant landscapes shots, while it would be VERY useful in the small alleys of Katmandu.
Even a manual focus one would be good, but the only one wide enough is the 15mm K-A (which becomes a 24mm on APS-C).
So a wide zoom made for digital cameras would be the most obvious choice, especially if you want to limit the number of lenses which you bring with you.


I have spent years in the East, since 1977, and i lived in Katmandu for many months, at different times. It is the most beautiful capital city i have seen in my life.
It is a fairy tale place, full of every kind of stimulating photographic subjects.
On top of that, it is safe, and if you want, you can go everywhere, at any time, day and night.
Only the main historical buildings, and hindu and buddist temples, would take many days to be visited (and more to be decently photographed), but my suggestion is to take some free time, and roam around in three different areas, looking for whatever catches your imagination:
1) market area around Asan Thole
2) down the alleys on the left, midway on the road from Thamel tourist area to Darbar Square
3) road that goes to the river (called "pig street" at the time of the hyppies), starting close to the "step pyramids" in Darbar square area - there are two roads, one big that goes to a bridge, and another smaller that has a public lavatory on the right side, and ends close to the river, near an hindu temple: it's the latter one!

Last time i have been there it was the very start of the maoist revolution, so it's some time ago, but i think that most things haven't changed in the meantime, because money and tourism were quite scarce during the civil war.
I had a friend in Katmandu who spent nearly 25 years there... but now he's married in Thailand.
I guess most the expats i met when i was there have long since relocated, because of the years of social unrest. It is a pity, because Katmandu, and all the other places i visited in Nepal, are truly wonderful.
No other place is so magical.
The more you scratch the surface, the more you find. It's a never ending discovery!

I whish you a nice journey, with lots of nice pictures, both of himalayan landscapes and of Katmandu.

cheers

Paolo

01-29-2013, 09:25 AM   #20
Site Supporter
disco_owner's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Sydney
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,608
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by cyberjunkie Quote
The Tamron 90mm Macro is the last lens i bought for my Pentax cameras.
It is the second version of the manual focus type.
Fortunately it came with an Adaptall P-KA adapter, which allows to use it with any exposure mode.
I owned the first version, the heavy, cylindrical one with rubber focusing ring, but i sold it ages ago.
It is a perfect lens for shooting flowers, small animals, particulars, and even sharp portraits.
It will be VERY useful both during your treck, and when you'll get back to Katmandu.

A (very) wide lens will be more useful in the streets of Katmandu, than for mountain landscapes.
If you don't shoot panoramas, you'll find that going too wide will produce insignificant landscapes shots, while it would be VERY useful in the small alleys of Katmandu.
Even a manual focus one would be good, but the only one wide enough is the 15mm K-A (which becomes a 24mm on APS-C).
So a wide zoom made for digital cameras would be the most obvious choice, especially if you want to limit the number of lenses which you bring with you.


I have spent years in the East, since 1977, and i lived in Katmandu for many months, at different times. It is the most beautiful capital city i have seen in my life.
It is a fairy tale place, full of every kind of stimulating photographic subjects.
On top of that, it is safe, and if you want, you can go everywhere, at any time, day and night.
Only the main historical buildings, and hindu and buddist temples, would take many days to be visited (and more to be decently photographed), but my suggestion is to take some free time, and roam around in three different areas, looking for whatever catches your imagination:
1) market area around Asan Thole
2) down the alleys on the left, midway on the road from Thamel tourist area to Darbar Square
3) road that goes to the river (called "pig street" at the time of the hyppies), starting close to the "step pyramids" in Darbar square area - there are two roads, one big that goes to a bridge, and another smaller that has a public lavatory on the right side, and ends close to the river, near an hindu temple: it's the latter one!

Last time i have been there it was the very start of the maoist revolution, so it's some time ago, but i think that most things haven't changed in the meantime, because money and tourism were quite scarce during the civil war.
I had a friend in Katmandu who spent nearly 25 years there... but now he's married in Thailand.
I guess most the expats i met when i was there have long since relocated, because of the years of social unrest. It is a pity, because Katmandu, and all the other places i visited in Nepal, are truly wonderful.
No other place is so magical.
The more you scratch the surface, the more you find. It's a never ending discovery!

I whish you a nice journey, with lots of nice pictures, both of himalayan landscapes and of Katmandu.

cheers

Paolo
Thanks for the great Insight Paolo and well wishes . really great to see things from another person's perspective , In recent years I've re-developed my passion for photography and hoping to bring back lots of colorful images and memories.

Regards Khosrow

Last edited by disco_owner; 01-29-2013 at 10:32 PM.
01-29-2013, 04:41 PM   #21
Site Supporter
cyberjunkie's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Bologna, Amsterdam, Chiang Mai
Posts: 270
QuoteOriginally posted by disco_owner Quote
Thanks for the geart Insight Paolo and well wishes . really great to see things from another person's perspective , In recent years I've re-developed my passion for photography and hoping to bring back lots of colorful images and memories.

Regards Khosrow
One more thing, regarding weather sealed lenses.
A WR equipment is always welcome, but there is something very peculiar in the weather of Katmandu valley, at the time you're going.
Maybe my experience could be of same use.
I remember that in late winter/early spring, and in general in pre-monsoon time, the weather in Katmandu valley was very strange.
Almost every day there was a splash of rain, either small or heavy, but there was one thing in common: the weather was wonderful during the morning, the in early afternoon it came the rain, which was gone by the time of sunset.
I asked, and i was told that most of the years the weather was like that.
A dry, clear morning, and a nice post-rain sunset, are very welcome for anybody looking for nice pictures.

cheers

Paolo
01-29-2013, 08:32 PM - 1 Like   #22
Forum Member




Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Minnesota, USA
Posts: 51
Good question. I've been on 2 treks, but the last was in '96. However, I've been there, done that so can at least relate my experience. Firstly, are you trekking or hiking? The Nepalis define them a bit backwards, IMHO. Trekkers hire porters, Sherpa guides, kitchen staff, etc. Hikers, to the Nepalis, haul their own gear. Also, are you staying primarily in tents or in hostels? Obviously, at base camp you will be in tents, but before then?

I ask, because the answers affect your gear selection. If you are packing your own gear, you will want to drastically limit the weight. Spend a week or two over 13,000 ft. And you realize how heavy a lens is. If you've got a Sherpa carrying things for you (what can I say, I'm old..and it supports the economy) you are a little more free to bring more lenses. If you stay in hostels, you will probably have some access to power on the route, and may be able to charge batteries. Don't count on it, though.

I would definitely bring the 15 mm. The 18-135 is light and WR and a great choice to keep on one of the bodies. You're not likely to get precipitation in trekking season, but I will say that I made extensive use of Gortex on the last trek in the Everest region, typhoons in the Bay of Bengal can dump a lot of rain unexpectedly. Having a WR along could be extremely useful. You'll also want to be careful with lens changes, it can be very dusty on the trail (a yak caravan, while photogenic, kicks up a LOT of dust). Changing lenses in a bag is a good idea, as is limiting the changes. Your idea of 2 bodies is excellent in regards to limiting lens changes. Quite frankly, you'll probably keep the zoom on most of the time. 135 mm is pretty good range with APS-C, and you can crop. Probably better than bringing more weight, unless someone else is hauling it for you. I'd pull out the Limiteds for those outstanding opportunities that will happen only 2 or 3....thousand times a day when you're on the trail.

Additional considerations would be at least 2 spare batteries for each body, as well as plenty of memory capacity. I know, obvious, but I'm trying to be complete. A small cleaning kit is an absolute must; as I noted, it can be very dusty. I'd keep spare lenses in waterproof bags, as a precaution, that covers them for both rain and dust. You'll need a plug adapter for Nepali electrical plugs and your charger, if you expect charging opportunities en route (I suggest charging everything you can in Namche Bazaar during your mandatory 48 hr acclimation stay).

For perspective, on my first trek, in '91, i had a Pentax ME, M 50 f2, M 28, M 135 and a 2x teleconverter. the ME took a lot of dust, and really was never the same after that. It was worth it for the pictures though. My kit in '96 consisted of a Pentax SF1n, Pentax F 35-70, Pentax F 50 1.7, and an off label Tokina 70-210 mm. M. I also had a small Pentax point and shoot zoom 35 mm as handy snap-shooter and backup. I had 2 spare batteries for each, a cleaning kit, and about 30 rolls of film (less than a single 8 GB card nowadays). Note also that the 210 in 35 mm terms didn't have much more reach than the 135 has in APS-C...a bit more, but not enough to justify an extra longer lens, in my opinion. The wider end is more what you'll want in the Himalayas.

Pablo, having lived there, obviously gives excellent recommendations regarding photo ops in Kathmandu. I heartily agree with everything he said. I would recommend that your group visit Bhaktapur, a nearby Newar city during your visit. It is also extremely picturesque.

Enjoy your magnificent opportunity. You are going to have a fantastic time.

Last edited by stens; 01-29-2013 at 08:40 PM.
01-31-2013, 10:22 AM - 1 Like   #23
Site Supporter
cyberjunkie's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Bologna, Amsterdam, Chiang Mai
Posts: 270
Yes, of course, the old capital of Bhaktapur (also called Bhaktipur or Bhagdaon), and the other old capital, Pagan.
And also the small Varanasi of Nepal: Pashupathinat.
If a power cord adapter is needed, i am sure you can find it in Namche Bazaar, if you didn't buy it back in Katmandu.
I am NOT the high-altitude trekker type... but i have done some small trecks on my own from Pokhara.
I have also done some sailing... the lake is wonderful.
Last time i have been to Pokhara, there was ONE sailing boat, but plenty or row boats for hire.
Last thing:
Stens is SUPER RIGHT about dust!
I forgot to mention it... maybe because you always remember the good things and forget about the inconvenient ones :-)
On one of my visists i brought with me a complete (and very cumbersome) Pentax outfit, with many lenses.
Fortunately i had two bags which were ALMOST impervious to dust.
Nevertheless, i ended up with dusty equipment, but nothing irreversible.
Believe it or not, i found the highest levels of dust when traveling.
Some small minibus can be quite new and regularly cleaned.
Standard buses are incredibly dusty, and your gear travels on top of the bus :-)
On the dry season any vehicle makes plenty of dust, because the two sides of the road are not asphalted.
With cameras like the LX it wasn't so big a problem, provided you kept a lens on.
With digital bodies you don't have sliding strip of film, kept in dust-proof cans before and after exposure. It is the same sensor, which is used over and over again.
Dust can slowly build up, and ruin all your pics.
Better review the photos, enlarging very much, and have ready a cleaning kit.
Of course a Pentax sealed body is much better, but every time you exchange a lens in the field there is a chance of getting dust inside the camera.

cheers

Paolo

02-02-2013, 12:32 PM   #24
Forum Member




Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Minnesota, USA
Posts: 51
QuoteOriginally posted by cyberjunkie Quote
Yes, of course, the old capital of Bhaktapur (also called Bhaktipur or Bhagdaon), and the other old capital, Pagan.
And also the small Varanasi of Nepal: Pashupathinat.
If a power cord adapter is needed, i am sure you can find it in Namche Bazaar, if you didn't buy it back in Katmandu.
I am NOT the high-altitude trekker type... but i have done some small trecks on my own from Pokhara.
I have also done some sailing... the lake is wonderful.
Last time i have been to Pokhara, there was ONE sailing boat, but plenty or row boats for hire.
Last thing:
Stens is SUPER RIGHT about dust!
I forgot to mention it... maybe because you always remember the good things and forget about the inconvenient ones :-)
On one of my visists i brought with me a complete (and very cumbersome) Pentax outfit, with many lenses.
Fortunately i had two bags which were ALMOST impervious to dust.
Nevertheless, i ended up with dusty equipment, but nothing irreversible.
Believe it or not, i found the highest levels of dust when traveling.
Some small minibus can be quite new and regularly cleaned.
Standard buses are incredibly dusty, and your gear travels on top of the bus :-)
On the dry season any vehicle makes plenty of dust, because the two sides of the road are not asphalted.
With cameras like the LX it wasn't so big a problem, provided you kept a lens on.
With digital bodies you don't have sliding strip of film, kept in dust-proof cans before and after exposure. It is the same sensor, which is used over and over again.
Dust can slowly build up, and ruin all your pics.
Better review the photos, enlarging very much, and have ready a cleaning kit.
Of course a Pentax sealed body is much better, but every time you exchange a lens in the field there is a chance of getting dust inside the camera.

cheers

Paolo
Thanks, Paolo, I could not remember Pashupathinat, in the Kathmandu valley. I'm jealous you were able to live in Nepal, that must have been interesting. Also, good point regarding Namche, you can buy an awful lot of stuff there. I really wouldn't be surprised if power plugs were available.

Thanks for pointing out how dusty the buses are. We flew to the jump-off points and back to Kathmandu on my treks, both on Royal Nepal Twin Otters and with one of the companies flying ex-Soviet MiL-8 helicopters, since we were pretty time-limited. A lot, probably a majority, of trekkers get to the jumping off points by bus, and your experience with dust is valuable information. I could only speak to the trails, from my experience.

I definitely need to get those old films scanned one of these days. I almost forgot how beautiful the lake was in Pokhara. We were there in '91, starting the Annapurna half-circuit. Never went on the lake, but I should have.

Last edited by stens; 02-02-2013 at 12:38 PM. Reason: Completeness
02-02-2013, 03:57 PM   #25
Site Supporter
disco_owner's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Sydney
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,608
Original Poster
Thank you Stens and cyberjunkie for your very informative posts. something else I forgot to mention , I am also planning on Taking the Pentax LX + smc A-20 mm along with all my Lee filters / Circular Filters to do lots Landscape shots and any other Film opportunity, is this a Viable option??

Lee Filters 0.6 + 0.9 Grad Soft , 0.9 Grad hard and Big stopper . and Lee Foundation Kit.

We will be trekking so I will carry all Photography gear in the Backpack while our sherpers will be carrying my own backpack with all our other gear.
02-02-2013, 06:54 PM   #26
Forum Member




Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Minnesota, USA
Posts: 51
You're welcome. From your question, you're much more of a photographer than am I. I've never used more than a circular polarizer, so I'm afraid I can't help with more detailed equipment advice. I'll defer to the experts here. Post some pictures when you get back, maybe a little essay on technique, and maybe I'll learn something.

Having the porters to help haul gear should free you to bring the extra photo gear. You won't be lacking any of your favorite equipment when you see something you like. There's photo ops wherever you look, starting when you arrive in Kathmandu, and continuing until you leave. You'll have a great time.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
camera, k-mount, k5, ltd, pentax lens, shots, slr lens, trek
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Which lens should I take to Florida? SashasMom Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 18 03-05-2012 06:10 PM
Trip to Europe, lenses to take along elpolodiablo Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 67 06-01-2011 02:42 AM
Which Lenses To Take to Antelope Canyon? mtngal Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 14 12-18-2009 09:19 PM
Which lens(es) to take to airshow ? Ken T Pentax DSLR Discussion 12 09-21-2008 10:40 PM
Which lenses to take to Boston? sholtzma Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 6 05-12-2008 05:29 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:25 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top