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10-26-2013, 01:07 PM   #46
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It's not cheap ($600) and not as fast as others, but worth every penny, and produces great images. Sigma 10-20mm f/3.5.

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10-28-2013, 09:24 AM   #47
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QuoteOriginally posted by lytrytyr Quote
Even so, with focus shift when stopping down fast lenses,
focus bracketing is still advisable.
Rare enough, but it is documented for some lenses.


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10-28-2013, 09:25 AM   #48
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QuoteOriginally posted by kh1234567890 Quote
Have you actually tried it with a hand-held manual telephoto ?



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11-01-2013, 03:47 PM   #49
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QuoteOriginally posted by tripodquest Quote
Thank you. Can you say if that will help with older lenses that are not as contrasty, or somewhat softer? I have a telephoto zoom (from Russia) that is somewhat slow and the focusing needs really fine work, moving the focus ring a millimeter makes a huge difference so it's like a hair trigger zoom... I use it in daylight so the brightness is not the problem but I need to use live view and digital zoom if I want to focus accurately (for example, focus on the correct branch or leaf of a tree with many levels of branches). Seeing whether what you want to focus on is in perfect focus, hyperfocal focus or just soft focus is pretty much impossible. I can get pictures where what I want in focus is in focus but... I don't have the control I would like. Finetuning the focus is impossible with the LV, just getting things in focus is enough of a challenge. It seems that the viewfinder accentuates the lack of contrast so that the pictures look more contrasty than what I see through the viewfinder. Do you think a focusing screen would help with this?
I mostly use manual focus lenses on a K-5 and have experience with both Canon ee-S (from Focusingscreen.com) and split prism focusing screens (a 45 degree split screen with microprism collar from a Ricoh KR-5 ground down to size). My eyesight isn't quite as perfect as yours but my experience is as follows.

The ee-S screen is a just great. It allows for focusing outside the center spot and the snap is really there most of the time. With sharp lenses there is a telltale shimmer in the in-focus areas. It's also usable with slower (f4 and slower) lenses. It does get rather dark with slow glass but doesn't completely black out. The price is pretty steep but the product is good. At least when I bought mine the package also included shimms to adjust the screen.

The split screen is not quite as versatile and makes spot metering useless. It is better in low light and faster. The microprism collar is especially nice in my experience. It's pretty big on an APS-C camera which mitigates the need to focus and recompose and allows for fast focusing even when there are no clear targets for the split screen. The split screen is also better for the softish lenses. My Vivitar 28mm f1.9 is a pain in the posterior to focus with the ee-S screen (I love the lens but snappy/sharp/contrasty wide open is not what I'd call it). Slow lenses cause the prism to black out. Price was pretty unbeatable (5 for the broken camera and a Ricoh Riconar 55mm) but it did take me about 4 hours to dig out the screen and grind it to size.

My widest manual focus lens is a Sigma Superwide II (24mm f2.8). Both screens work with it but the split screen makes focusing faster and more decisive. Near infity focusing is always a bit of a chore. Everything looks small and the required adjustments are minute.

When I need critical focus I just use magnified live view. The camera will be on a tripod anyway when image quality is that important.

11-02-2013, 07:48 AM   #50
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QuoteOriginally posted by Imcalfin Quote
I mostly use manual focus lenses on a K-5 and have experience with both Canon ee-S (from Focusingscreen.com) and split prism focusing screens (a 45 degree split screen with microprism collar from a Ricoh KR-5 ground down to size). My eyesight isn't quite as perfect as yours but my experience is as follows.

The ee-S screen is a just great. It allows for focusing outside the center spot and the snap is really there most of the time. With sharp lenses there is a telltale shimmer in the in-focus areas. It's also usable with slower (f4 and slower) lenses. It does get rather dark with slow glass but doesn't completely black out. The price is pretty steep but the product is good. At least when I bought mine the package also included shimms to adjust the screen.

The split screen is not quite as versatile and makes spot metering useless. It is better in low light and faster. The microprism collar is especially nice in my experience. It's pretty big on an APS-C camera which mitigates the need to focus and recompose and allows for fast focusing even when there are no clear targets for the split screen. The split screen is also better for the softish lenses. My Vivitar 28mm f1.9 is a pain in the posterior to focus with the ee-S screen (I love the lens but snappy/sharp/contrasty wide open is not what I'd call it). Slow lenses cause the prism to black out. Price was pretty unbeatable (5 for the broken camera and a Ricoh Riconar 55mm) but it did take me about 4 hours to dig out the screen and grind it to size.

My widest manual focus lens is a Sigma Superwide II (24mm f2.8). Both screens work with it but the split screen makes focusing faster and more decisive. Near infity focusing is always a bit of a chore. Everything looks small and the required adjustments are minute.

When I need critical focus I just use magnified live view. The camera will be on a tripod anyway when image quality is that important.
Thank you for your reply!
11-02-2013, 12:09 PM   #51
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QuoteOriginally posted by Buceemie Quote
It's not cheap ($600) and not as fast as others, but worth every penny, and produces great images. Sigma 10-20mm f/3.5.
looks good. i decided to go with a tamron zoom. it doesn't quite reach down to 10mm or even close but it's perfect for my needs and it's fast enough for an unbeatable price.
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