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05-18-2014, 05:34 AM   #16
Des
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QuoteOriginally posted by Sorver Quote
Thank you so much for your opinions on the above I have been looking at these lenses particularly the 170-500 I love photographing wildlife I just wonder about the weight and size do you find it difficult to cart?
The short answer is yes. The 170-500 is rather bulky, although it balances quite well on my K-30. The weight is the main issue for me. It weighs about 1350g, which is almost triple my next heaviest lens! Some people are comfortable lugging around that kind of weight, but I find it a bit of a drain on a walk, especially if you add a tripod and head.

Still, to put that in perspective, the 170-500 is relatively light amongst 400mm or 500mm lens (other than mirror lenses). The Sigma 150-500 and 50-500 (the Bigma) each weigh more than 1900g (nearly half as much again). Even the Sigma 135-400 weighs about 1200g, and the 120-400 about 1700g. The well-regarded (but hard-to-find) Sigma 400 f5.6 tele-macro weighs about 1400g.

Using a lens at these long focal lengths is quite different to using, say, a 250mm or 300mm lens. They can be used handheld or with a monopod in good conditions, but generally it is better to use a tripod, keep the speed up (1/500th or faster) and stop down to at least f8 if possible. So they are best in good light.

Sorry to everyone for going off the thread topic.

05-18-2014, 05:48 AM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by Sorver Quote
Thank you so much for your opinions on the above I have been looking at these lenses particularly the 170-500 I love photographing wildlife I just wonder about the weight and size do you find it difficult to cart?
Heavy lenses require a special person to love them. They will suck the life out of you. Especially since with wildlife, sometimes you carry the lens for hours and don't get an image. That being said. I try and take one wherever I go. On walks over 10 km (6 miles) its' really hard to want take one though. It becomes a job.
05-19-2014, 01:36 AM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by interested_observer Quote
Here are a few more suggestions... You have received some wonderful advice. Photography is pretty capital intensive, you can always find reasons to spend money. Here are a couple of additional items to consider.
  • Battery - If you are going to do some backpacking, take an extra battery or two. If you are going to be near a power plug, then perhaps an additional single battery. Wasabi batteries cost 1/4, last 3/4 and charger 2x as the Pentax OEM ones. About $12 each and get one with a charger, so that in a pinch you can recharge both your Pentax and spare at the same time.
  • Shutter release - If you are going to be doing stitching or panoramas, then a remote shutter release will help. Either an IR or wired, both are reasonably cheap - about $10.
  • SD Cards - These are all pretty cheap. Just get Class 10 and 32GB cards are pretty inexpensive. 2 cards and you are set. About $15 to $20 each. Lots of good brands Transend, PNY, SanDisk, etc.
  • Lenses - As has been said, what you have is way more than sufficient. There is very little you can't do with them. The only thing that comes to mind is taking images of the eyes of bugs. Play with and experiment with what you have. Take pictures from on high, down low (ground level), eye level, waist level - they will all be different. Take landscapes with telephotos - and stitch, along with at 18mm. Again they will all be different. Take long exposures. Take a series of images on a tripod of a sunrise or the sun illuminating the mountain peaks, and stack them together. Your "film" is free. Try out bracketing (HDR). You will be astounded at the amount of light there is at night - especially what the camera can "see". Also, look for light. Light is the main part of photography. Light at sun rise and sun set, the angle is low and the coloration is different, which makes for fantastic pictures. Also the blue and golden hour before sunrise and after sunset - the irradicent blue in the sky at those times. The light from the moon is also very good. The light and arrangement of shadows - especially in the mountains and through the trees. Take a look at the kit lens images posted. Take a look at the images and see if there is anything that you are interested in that can't be done?
  • Software - Your camera came with the OEM software, which is actually pretty good - and the price was right. Experiment with that. There is also lots of free and trial software utilities out there that will help. In time you will find out what appeals to you.
Have fun!!!!! Take lots of pictures, but not at the expense of looking only using the viewfinder. Too many folks go on vacation and only see through the viewfinder.

Also, just a word of caution with polarizers. Anything really wider than about 24mm wide (ie 18-24mm), the lens will be too wide for the polarizer to apply its polarization evenly across the image - in particular, the sky. Also, polarizers do not stitch well.I am also going to add one additional item. With a K50, you have the same sensor as in the K5/II/IIs. There is very little that sensor can not do. You can even print 20" x 30" with it. ISO 100 to 3200 is very easy with it. It takes noise reduction processing very well. It has excellent dynamic range. When in doubt - take the picture and worry about processing it later. You really do have everything to take any image you can conceive of. You are only limited by your own thinking.

Fully agree about post production work I too am just learning the dslr side of things and have had my shutter speed too quick and had some very dark shots which have come out beautiful with auto correct I am happy with the k-50 it has been very kind to me so far and yes have invested in a good shutter remote for a whole $10 as stated and two spare batteries and also a double A battery case handy when you can't recharge and just need some batteries quick I have a polarise filter too but have not found the need to use it but may come in handy to protect the lens........... Got to use it tho for that to be any use . I got an extreme pro card because I like the quick load to the card with shutter speed I hate waiting anytime for anything lol lucky I got an interest in photography in the digital age.

---------- Post added 05-19-14 at 01:43 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Des Quote
The short answer is yes. The 170-500 is rather bulky, although it balances quite well on my K-30. The weight is the main issue for me. It weighs about 1350g, which is almost triple my next heaviest lens! Some people are comfortable lugging around that kind of weight, but I find it a bit of a drain on a walk, especially if you add a tripod and head.

Still, to put that in perspective, the 170-500 is relatively light amongst 400mm or 500mm lens (other than mirror lenses). The Sigma 150-500 and 50-500 (the Bigma) each weigh more than 1900g (nearly half as much again). Even the Sigma 135-400 weighs about 1200g, and the 120-400 about 1700g. The well-regarded (but hard-to-find) Sigma 400 f5.6 tele-macro weighs about 1400g.

Using a lens at these long focal lengths is quite different to using, say, a 250mm or 300mm lens. They can be used handheld or with a monopod in good conditions, but generally it is better to use a tripod, keep the speed up (1/500th or faster) and stop down to at least f8 if possible. So they are best in good light.

Sorry to everyone for going off the thread topic.
My apologies to everyone for dragging him there 😜
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