Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
05-22-2008, 03:49 AM   #1
New Member




Join Date: May 2008
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 8
Sigma 17-70 and Macro function

Hi everyone,

I'm new to DSLR's and SLR's for that matter. I have had my k10d and sigma 17-70 lense for about a month and this forum is certainly helping me to learn how to use it so I thank you all for that.

My question relates to the macro function on this lense. Theres nothing in the instructions on how to activate it so my assumption is that to shoot in macro all I need to do is extend the zoom (to 70) and then get within .2 of a metre (thats noted on the lense) of what I want to shoot and then the lense somehow knows it needs to go macro. Can someone enlighten me on this??

thanks
Jake

05-22-2008, 04:00 AM   #2
Veteran Member
pentagor's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 473
If you rotate the zoom ring, you can see the different ratios between real life size of object and the size of object on the sensor. The ratio depends on the focal length and the distance between front lens element and object (focusing or working distance). Basically each lens has this ratio, but it is called macro, when it is close to 1:1. Higher than that it is a "micro".
1:1 means, that if the subject is 23.5mm wide, if will fill up the whole sensor width (the whole image).
There is 0.2m on the lens as the closest focusing distance, but from my experiences, you can focus literally ON the front lens element.

Oh, and: welcome to the forums!
05-22-2008, 04:44 AM   #3
Veteran Member
palmor's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: North of Boston, MA
Posts: 798
QuoteOriginally posted by pentagor Quote
There is 0.2m on the lens as the closest focusing distance, but from my experiences, you can focus literally ON the front lens element.

Oh, and: welcome to the forums!
You've got that right. I was taking a photo of this crab (see link) and I manually focused down and just moved the camera, at one point I actually bumped into the crab!

20080413-IMGP1652.jpg photo - palmor photos at pbase.com


John
05-22-2008, 05:34 AM   #4
Veteran Member
pentagor's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 473
QuoteOriginally posted by palmor Quote
You've got that right. I was taking a photo of this crab (see link) and I manually focused down and just moved the camera, at one point I actually bumped into the crab!

20080413-IMGP1652.jpg photo - palmor photos at pbase.com


John
LOL

05-22-2008, 06:54 AM   #5
Veteran Member
cupic's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Australia-NSW
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 4,724
love both shots of the crab very detail


Thanks for sharing


cheers
05-22-2008, 07:37 AM   #6
New Member
chadvw's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Grand Rapids
Posts: 21
Its not that it 'knows' to go into 'macro' mode, it just has the ability to focus REALLY really close to the subject. This is true at both the 70mm and at 17mm, its definitely fun to use, but be careful when shooting something delicate...I just about squished a butterfly the other day when I realized that the lenshood was pinning the wings down on a bench at the park
05-22-2008, 08:49 AM   #7
Veteran Member




Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Ste-Anne des Plaines, Qc., Canada
Posts: 2,014
Hi Palmor
Is Ash an Australian shepard. I have one and it looks just like this one, except for one brown eye and one bluish white eye.
05-22-2008, 11:05 AM   #8
Veteran Member
palmor's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: North of Boston, MA
Posts: 798
QuoteOriginally posted by flyer Quote
Hi Palmor
Is Ash an Australian shepard. I have one and it looks just like this one, except for one brown eye and one bluish white eye.
Hi Flyer,
Yes he is! Ash has a ~1/3 blue eye.. funny thing is that the eyelashes on the semi-blue eye are brown while the lashes on the brown eye are white. Same thing with yours?

05-22-2008, 03:19 PM   #9
New Member




Join Date: May 2008
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 8
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by chadvw Quote
Its not that it 'knows' to go into 'macro' mode, it just has the ability to focus REALLY really close to the subject.

this clarifies it for me but thanks to all responses. I did chuckle at the butterfly story and thats a cool crab picture.
05-22-2008, 04:04 PM   #10
Veteran Member




Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Ste-Anne des Plaines, Qc., Canada
Posts: 2,014
QuoteOriginally posted by palmor Quote
Hi Flyer,
Yes he is! Ash has a ~1/3 blue eye.. funny thing is that the eyelashes on the semi-blue eye are brown while the lashes on the brown eye are white. Same thing with yours?
The eyebrows on my dog are brown on both eyes. His blue eye (if you can call that whitish color blue) has a brown spot in it. Unfortunately, he is now over 10 years old and having hip problems. He easily is the friendliest dog I ever had. I'll try to post some pictures this week end, when I'm home.
05-23-2008, 06:15 AM   #11
Veteran Member
palmor's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: North of Boston, MA
Posts: 798
QuoteOriginally posted by Jake Quote
this clarifies it for me but thanks to all responses. I did chuckle at the butterfly story and thats a cool crab picture.
Glad we could all help, and glad you liked the crab photo

QuoteOriginally posted by flyer Quote
The eyebrows on my dog are brown on both eyes. His blue eye (if you can call that whitish color blue) has a brown spot in it. Unfortunately, he is now over 10 years old and having hip problems. He easily is the friendliest dog I ever had. I'll try to post some pictures this week end, when I'm home.
Can't wait to see them! I really need to get out and take some more photos of Ash, especially now that I taught him to catch a Frisbee (well "teach" is kind of an overstatement, I tossed the Frisbee a few times and he just went up and caught it on his own)


John
05-23-2008, 04:01 PM   #12
Veteran Member
Dale's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Surfcoast Victoria Australia
Posts: 560
QuoteOriginally posted by pentagor Quote
If you rotate the zoom ring, you can see the different ratios between real life size of object and the size of object on the sensor. The ratio depends on the focal length and the distance between front lens element and object (focusing or working distance). Basically each lens has this ratio, but it is called macro, when it is close to 1:1. Higher than that it is a "micro".
1:1 means, that if the subject is 23.5mm wide, if will fill up the whole sensor width (the whole image).
There is 0.2m on the lens as the closest focusing distance, but from my experiences, you can focus literally ON the front lens element.

Oh, and: welcome to the forums!
And to add to this, I have started holding the lens with my left hand index finger extended out as an impact warning when shooting shells on rocks!

Check out the Melbourne pentax meets, I'm sure you will get some tips on how not to immerse the filter threads in a soup when doing food macros.




Dale
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
function, k-mount, lense, macro, pentax lens, sigma, slr lens
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
For Sale - Sold: Tamron Di 90mm macro, Sigma EX 50mm macro, Sigma 28/1.8 MF Light_Horseman Sold Items 4 02-07-2010 11:40 AM
Macro function?? Seltzer Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 5 06-24-2008 02:32 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:39 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top