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04-03-2015, 03:50 PM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by clackers Quote
I'm reporting you to the Occupational Hralth and Safety officer!

If you're shooting on a bench, why would you need to bend at all? :-)
Woops! I hate health officers! Just kidding. Well, in many cases, I take the camera off the tripod for different angles-that's why.


Last edited by ychousa; 04-03-2015 at 04:10 PM.
04-03-2015, 04:15 PM   #17
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What lenses do you have? I'd recommend getting a set of extension tubes asks spending your money on lighting, unless you are set for lighting. Extension tubes plus any 50mm or 85mm (especially manual focus) are good enough to get you started. Lighting is really more important for tabletop imagery than what lens you are using.





04-03-2015, 04:17 PM   #18
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You really have plenty of choices when it comes to product photography. If you're fine with cropping, you can get away with using a non-macro lens and keeping a reasonable distance. For subjects the size you're talking about, I would personally use a short tele macro lens like the DFA 50mm, as you'll be able to fill the frame without having to get too close or be too far away.

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04-04-2015, 12:21 PM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by fuent104 Quote
What lenses do you have? I'd recommend getting a set of extension tubes asks spending your money on lighting, unless you are set for lighting. Extension tubes plus any 50mm or 85mm (especially manual focus) are good enough to get you started. Lighting is really more important for tabletop imagery than what lens you are using
I totally agree. Lighting is really important. Can you recommend reasonably priced extension tubes? Haven't tried any yet and just want to start with a good but not-too-expensive one, say around $100~$200?

04-04-2015, 03:15 PM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by ychousa Quote
I totally agree. Lighting is really important. Can you recommend reasonably priced extension tubes? Haven't tried any yet and just want to start with a good but not-too-expensive one, say around $100~$200?
If you have manual focus lenses, these should be great:

Pentax Auto Extension Tube K Set from Japan | eBay
04-05-2015, 10:20 AM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by fuent104 Quote
If you have manual focus lenses, these should be great:

Pentax Auto Extension Tube K Set from Japan | eBay
Thanks for the link, but I have only 1 manual now and intend to use AF lenses in most works. Haven't tried, but Not sure if my skill is enough to produce sharp-enough images for product shots (mostly on high-quality web images.) with manual focus lenses such as M50 1.7 with an extension tube-still need better skill to focus, etc. The one in the link is pretty big-can I separate them or is it just one attached tube?

---------- Post added 04-05-15 at 10:22 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by fuent104 Quote
If you have manual focus lenses, these should be great:

Pentax Auto Extension Tube K Set from Japan | eBay
Were your sample images taken with a manual lens? if so which one? Thanks.

BTW, I don't know how to explain this, but after i bought an M50 1.7 couple weeks ago, I became to love this manual lens than AF lens. I love the vintage look, enjoy the process to focus in liveview (my vision is not good, so I can only focus with magnification), also the some unexplainable feel from the images, etc. Kind of reminds me the time that I used LP records? :-) My DA 35mm f2.4, a great sharp lens with great color, but some digital feeling like music from CD. Not sure if FA 43mm would produce this feeling of manual lens (or better) with AF. If so, I might really want to invest money on it. Anyways, this is just becoming a real fun to me!

Last edited by ychousa; 04-05-2015 at 10:36 AM.
04-05-2015, 07:27 PM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by ychousa Quote
Thanks for the link, but I have only 1 manual now and intend to use AF lenses in most works. Haven't tried, but Not sure if my skill is enough to produce sharp-enough images for product shots (mostly on high-quality web images.) with manual focus lenses such as M50 1.7 with an extension tube-still need better skill to focus, etc. The one in the link is pretty big-can I separate them or is it just one attached tube?

---------- Post added 04-05-15 at 10:22 AM ----------



Were your sample images taken with a manual lens? if so which one? Thanks.

BTW, I don't know how to explain this, but after i bought an M50 1.7 couple weeks ago, I became to love this manual lens than AF lens. I love the vintage look, enjoy the process to focus in liveview (my vision is not good, so I can only focus with magnification), also the some unexplainable feel from the images, etc. Kind of reminds me the time that I used LP records? :-) My DA 35mm f2.4, a great sharp lens with great color, but some digital feeling like music from CD. Not sure if FA 43mm would produce this feeling of manual lens (or better) with AF. If so, I might really want to invest money on it. Anyways, this is just becoming a real fun to me!
The set at the link is 3 separate tubes. They are different lengths, for different amounts of extension, and you can stack them to add them.

The first two images I posted were taken with my M50 f1.4, and the third was with my M50 f1.7.

Autofocus is a nice feature in a lens. With macro shooting, it is probably less useful, because you have so little depth of field that you tend to focus by moving the camera backward or forward. At least that is how I do it. I've heard of other people working this way, too.
04-06-2015, 12:20 AM   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by fuent104 Quote
because you have so little depth of field that you tend to focus by moving the camera backward or forward. At least that is how I do it. I've heard of other people working this way, too.
Same.

Must get one of those sliding heads for tripod.

04-06-2015, 07:39 AM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by dcshooter Quote
The relative usefulness of a manual focus lens depends a lot on the size of object the OP intends to photograph.
And the size he actually needs to use them at. He says high quality web images above, which is a lot different than a full page magazine shot or a 20x30 print of the shot for the company's entry or boardroom or whatever.

If he needed huge high quality prints, then he'd the argument for a longish macro so he can get 1:1 without blocking light is much better. For web quality shots, a wider lens like the 35mm macro would be fine since he can crop them down if needed.
04-06-2015, 10:28 PM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by dcshooter Quote
The relative usefulness of a manual focus lens depends a lot on the size of object the OP intends to photograph. A ~6" object is not really macro shooting, and in my experience is more easily done with an AF lens. I take a lot of pictures for lenses to sell here on the marketplace and other online fora. These are all more in the "small" range than in macro range.

I find myself almost exclusively using the 35mm Limited Macro handheld in AF mode with single point focus, since it allows me to quickly pinpoint the focus and churn through the shots. I use manual exposure and flash modes for consistent lighting with a bounced speedlight, sometimes on-camera and sometimes off. For a 1"-6" object, handheld is fine, since it's easy enough to hold the focus point steady, and the use of strobes keeps the effective exposure time so low that there is no effect from hand-shake, even at close focusing distances. I don't typically use a super-involved lighting setup, but even when I have, I've never had a problem with the camera shading the item, since working distance usually is no less than 1' or so. I also occasionally shoot with a small light tent and a couple of speedlights, and have never had any problems there, either, and that s for images requiring minimal to no cropping.

For what it's worth, I also currently own the 50mm FA macro as well as several longer MF macros in the 90-200mm range, and I've tried them all before settling on the 35. It simply is the easiest to use in this scenario and provides quality equal to or better than any of the other options. If I were doing a ton of very small true macro closeups (e.g. microchips, etc.), then I'd consider switching to the 50mm or another macro lens with a tripod, but the 35mm simply offers the best combination of flexibility, ease of use, quick focus, comfortable working range, good picture quality, etc. etc. etc.
Hmm..I'm very much being persuaded by your valuable suggestion! Even though my main purpose is for web presentation, I really need "HIGH" quality images, so I was kind of hesitant to use 35mm because I found my DA 35mm f2.4 is not as good as 50mm in terms of sharpness-but you're right. It could be because of the lighting conditions and DA 35 f2.4 might not be as sharp as DA 35 macro. May I ask your strobes setup for your successful shots? And do you think DA 35 f2.4 and DA 35 macro are different in terms of sharpness and expression? Thank you very much for your comment!
04-06-2015, 11:18 PM   #26
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Perhaps you could share done images that show what you are looking to achieve...
04-07-2015, 07:39 AM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by fuent104 Quote
Perhaps you could share done images that show what you are looking to achieve...
These are the sample images that I want to achieve. They're web images but they're in very high quality. Which lens would be better for this kind of closeup shots? I believe K-3 should have enough resolution to deliver similar results, right?
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04-07-2015, 10:31 AM   #28
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I think the K3 and just about any lens could get get you that level of quality. It looks like a longer focal length to me (at least 50mm), probably stopped down quite a bit, because there is a lot of depth of field. Shooting at base ISO, stopped down, with multiple sources of light (most likely flashes), you can achieve this level of quality for sure.
04-07-2015, 10:48 AM   #29
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QuoteOriginally posted by dcshooter Quote
The closest you are going to get to that is with a light tent , although honestly, those appear to be CAD renders rather than actual photos.
Hmm.. that is very interesting topic that I'm really interested. If you're aware, could you give me a little detail about how to achieve this kind of processing in CAD (or link?) I've known post processing, but CAD processing is a new concept to me that excites me! Thanks.

---------- Post added 04-07-15 at 10:52 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by fuent104 Quote
I think the K3 and just about any lens could get get you that level of quality. It looks like a longer focal length to me (at least 50mm), probably stopped down quite a bit, because there is a lot of depth of field. Shooting at base ISO, stopped down, with multiple sources of light (most likely flashes), you can achieve this level of quality for sure.
That sounds great. So, it doesn't need to be a macro lens? I'm considering either DA 50 f1.8 or FA 50 f1.7, or maybe FA 43mm limited for other types of fun. If it could be done without a macro lens, I don't really want to buy a macro lens frankly.

Just a general question though-normal lens with extension tube and macro lens-do they have any difference? Can I say Macro lens has more corner sharpness, aside from distance? Thanks.
04-07-2015, 02:26 PM   #30
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QuoteOriginally posted by dcshooter Quote
It's not a photo processing technique. CAD rendering means they just took the CAD (Computer Aided Design) files created when they designed the product (or ones generated after the fact and based on a physical product) and used it to generate a photorealistic image of the object in question. Think of it like a single frame from a CGI movie. They can be seem very realistic and photo-like, but do not show imperfections like reflections, dust, etc.
Oh, I see. You meant it was designed in CAD by some kind of 3D like rendering, right? I thought you meant CAD software has come up with a new function to process actual photo to render this kind of final product. I now see what you meant.
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