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07-04-2018, 11:32 AM   #46
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I agree it’s a great thread. I got a lot of valuable advise so far

07-04-2018, 01:48 PM - 2 Likes   #47
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QuoteOriginally posted by TwoUptons Quote
Iíll be a little contrarian...

Leave the tripod at home and go find a bright day and a sporting event with bright uniforms... ��

-Eric
I'm with Eric. Honestly, why are people advising a tripod and faster than 1/1000 shutter speed for shooting LEAVES on what appears to be a not-too-windy summer day? Getting your shots right is NOT so much about extreme stabilization or faster-than-sound shutter speeds. Or about hoarding expensive prime lenses. It is, to a very large degree, about picking subjects and compositions that allow your photos to pop - and of course about getting to know your camera.

It takes a very good lens to deliver razor sharpness at a fully open aperture - but do you really need that? I'm sure sharpness improves from f4 and down. Also, the focus plane at that aperture is narrow enough that most of the leaves on your second foliage shot are out of focus.

I would suggest playing around with the TAv-setting - it is what I use for 90% or more of my pictures. Set the aperture for something-less-than-fully-open, and play around with the shutter time. In my world, 1/2000 is reserved for birds and insects in flight, and tripods are for my 500mm lens - but find your own style. And most of all, like Eric suggests, find a rewarding subject with colour and contrast!
07-04-2018, 02:00 PM - 2 Likes   #48
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QuoteOriginally posted by MetteHHH Quote
I'm with Eric. Honestly, why are people advising a tripod and faster than 1/1000 shutter speed for shooting LEAVES on what appears to be a not-too-windy summer day? Getting your shots right is NOT so much about extreme stabilization or faster-than-sound shutter speeds. Or about hoarding expensive prime lenses. It is, to a very large degree, about picking subjects and compositions that allow your photos to pop - and of course about getting to know your camera.

It takes a very good lens to deliver razor sharpness at a fully open aperture - but do you really need that? I'm sure sharpness improves from f4 and down. Also, the focus plane at that aperture is narrow enough that most of the leaves on your second foliage shot are out of focus.

I would suggest playing around with the TAv-setting - it is what I use for 90% or more of my pictures. Set the aperture for something-less-than-fully-open, and play around with the shutter time. In my world, 1/2000 is reserved for birds and insects in flight, and tripods are for my 500mm lens - but find your own style. And most of all, like Eric suggests, find a rewarding subject with colour and contrast!
I use a tripod a lot for landscape images, but I am shooting at sunrise stopped down and doing traditional pixel shift. I get excellent results, but as you say, for middle of the day shooting there is plenty of light to get good results without using a tripod.

I typically use standard auto focus through the viewfinder and it is fine. I don't typically shoot at f2.8 unless I am shooting portraits (or something else I want more narrow depth of field) or, if light conditions demand it.

As far as telling sharpness of a lens, much as I hate to say it, taking a photo of a brick wall with the camera perpendicular to it is probably the best way I've found to identify real issues with a lens. That said, often the issues you see there aren't a problem in real world shooting.
07-04-2018, 02:58 PM - 2 Likes   #49
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QuoteOriginally posted by MetteHHH Quote
Honestly, why are people advising a tripod and faster than 1/1000 shutter speed for shooting LEAVES on what appears to be a not-too-windy summer day
Easy. Not knowing much about the shooter's holding technique other than new to this, and knowing it's a large heavy telephoto lens and the question is about ruling out lens issues, getting a stable platform and a high shutter speed help to rule out user induced variables like shake. Regarding leaves, right, what's the point of shooting leaves as described, but from an educational standpoint, if the new shooter isn't familiar with this type of thing, they probably don't realize if you're trying to stop the motion on something like little leaves fluttering in the wind with a 200mm lens, they're going to need a pretty high shutter speed or they will see blur, and if they're trying to figure out how the lens is performing and just took such a shot, seems to make sense to give a little info on what would be more likely to work.

And yes, getting out and taking real life pictures is the best, and brick walls do make great test subjects for a variety of reasons.

07-04-2018, 06:32 PM   #50
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AI8877 It would be really nice if you could let us know how you go with this issue. I like to help out where I can with advice but feedback is most appreciated too. Good luck.
07-04-2018, 06:50 PM   #51
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QuoteOriginally posted by TwoUptons Quote
Iíll be a little contrarian...

Leave the tripod at home and go find a bright day and a sporting event with bright uniforms... 🙂

-Eric
Iíll do this when possible. If you mean about PF even wide open it is really good. Nothing like old zooms. My DA*55 is fringin monster. You put that side to side with 70-200 and you get white color.
07-04-2018, 08:49 PM   #52
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QuoteOriginally posted by BROO Quote
AI8877 It would be really nice if you could let us know how you go with this issue. I like to help out where I can with advice but feedback is most appreciated too. Good luck.
Yes I will, unfortunately I had another long day at work and I didn’t get the chance to do more testing.
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