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09-19-2008, 01:35 PM   #16
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People look at the world through different eyes. This carries over into their photography. Some people have a telephoto perspective. Others have a "normal" perspective. And still others have a wide-angle perspective. I tend to fall into the last category and seldom shoot at focal lengths above 85mm with most of my work being done between 16mm and 40mm.

Beyond the shooter's preferred perspective, the main reason that wide-angle lenses are used for landscape is because the subject is often simply too big/close to photograph at narrow angle.

Now shooting with a wide-angle has a few quirks:
  • Perspective may be "unusual" depending on whether a foreground subject is present along with the scenic background
  • Ultra-wide lenses usually have some degree of barrel distortion. For landscapes, this usually means a curved horizon if the camera is not level. The more moderate 28mm and 35mm focal lengths are usually rectilinear (little or no distortion) despite their wider field of view.
  • There is greater apparent depth-of-field
  • Wide angle lenses are often more prone to flare.
  • Ultra-wide lenses have more of a tendency to chromatic aberration and almost all exhibit some degree of purple fringing (PF).
  • It may not be possible to mount a filter on the front of some ultra-wides.

Steve


Last edited by stevebrot; 09-20-2008 at 10:51 AM.
09-19-2008, 11:58 PM   #17
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Good Inexpensive Lens for Landscapes

If you are really into landscapes ( and also interiors ) I'd say bite the bullet, spend the money and get a Sigma 10/20, you will not be sorry, it is a awesome lens. It really excells as a wide angle. If you feel that its just too much to invest in one lens, perhaps you could borrow or rent one for a few days and you'll find out first hand why people that have them, love them. ken
09-20-2008, 12:04 AM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by mhertel Quote
If you can find a nice used one.. FA 20mm F/2.8 Great Lens!
my experience with that lens is that it has too much purple fringeing to be usable. Still a lot of people recommend it.
09-20-2008, 12:32 AM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by McLovin Quote
Thanks for the help so far guys. I do already have and use the kit lens that came with the K10D, and I agree it's a pretty good lens and it's what I've been using so far. My only other lens is the Tamron Af 90mm 1:1 macro lens which I use for macro shots but can't use at all for landscapes.

The reason I am wondering about wide angle is because for me, landscape shots basically mean shots of mountain ranges (I live in BC, I notice a lot of you who posted in this thread do as well so you know what I mean haha) but then again I've never used a wide angle lens so I don't really know what the benefit will be, I've just been told wide angle is good for that kind of thing.

I could definitely just stick with the kit lens though for a while, the adjustable focal length is nice and since I've been doing "okay" with it (like I said, still learning in general) and like someone mentioned I could always try the panarama feature if I feel like doing something different.
Have been in your position and understand where you are coming from. I made a few mistakes that maybe you can avoid.

My/our kit lenses were Sigma 18-125 & Pentax 18-55, both are very capable of taking good photos, however I was looking for something "more". I purchased a Sigma EX DG 24mm f1.8 which also did a good job (probably better than 'good').... but not wide enough although I had my low light situations covered. Note that I bought the lens in the absence of being able to get anything else at short notice.

Eventually I have added the DA 14mm and 43 Ltd. With respect, I suggest you look at doing something along those lines. They are that good, and whilst not "in-expensive" neither are they outrageous. In fact the 43Ltd is great value for what it is and does.

Others to consider are Pentax 12-24, and any of the primes.

Good luck with your decision.


Last edited by Mallee Boy; 09-20-2008 at 12:36 AM. Reason: gramma
09-20-2008, 10:22 AM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by Nesster Quote
There's some freeware I forgot the name of that will read through your image files and report out what focal lengths you've used the most. But even without that, shoot what you like how you like with the kit, and keep track of what focal length you tend to favor: that probably will be your most useful prime.
Google for "Exposureplot". It's a free download. Put all your images in one folder for the analyis. It will graph a few variables for you.
09-20-2008, 10:41 AM   #21
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McLovin since your budget is already 2 to 3 hundred you might want to keep saving up until the DA15LTD is released. It should be perfect for the big sky views you are shooting.
09-20-2008, 10:58 AM   #22
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I asked the same question a couple of weeks ago and everyone told me to get the Tamron SP 17-50 f2.8 LD Di II but it was 400.00 and it seams to be a real good lens although I've only had it 3 days.
09-20-2008, 11:06 AM   #23
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I own both the Sigma 17-70 & Sigma 10-20, both very good lenses & either would meet your requirements...ultimately though I'd suggest the 10-20, it hasn't been off my camera since I bought it. it. !! I was always a little frustrated by the 17mm, found it slightly limited compositions, the 10-20 adds a whole new dimension to landscapes although it also requires more thought & concentration.

simon

09-20-2008, 03:34 PM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
People look at the world through different eyes. This carries over into their photography. Some people have a telephoto perspective. Others have a "normal" perspective. And still others have a wide-angle perspective. I tend to fall into the last category and seldom shoot at focal lengths above 85mm with most of my work being done between 16mm and 40mm.

Beyond the shooter's preferred perspective, the main reason that wide-angle lenses are used for landscape is because the subject is often simply too big/close to photograph at narrow angle.

Now shooting with a wide-angle has a few quirks:
  • Perspective may be "unusual" depending on whether a foreground subject is present along with the scenic background
  • Ultra-wide lenses usually have some degree of barrel distortion. For landscapes, this usually means a curved horizon if the camera is not level. The more moderate 28mm and 35mm focal lengths are usually rectilinear (little or no distortion) despite their wider field of view.
  • There is greater apparent depth-of-field
  • Wide angle lenses are often more prone to flare.
  • Ultra-wide lenses have more of a tendency to chromatic aberration and almost all exhibit some degree of purple fringing (PF).
  • It may not be possible to mount a filter on the front of some ultra-wides.

Steve

I think Steve makes some very good points here.

I haven't been out with my Tamron 28-75 yet for landscape and am curious still if it is going to be wide enough. I know a lot of my shooting thus far when I was out hiking a lot I didn't go wide very often. Most was done at the zoom zoom end of my P&S. I will have to go back through my photos and examine the FLs to decide if I need a wide angle lens.
This has been on my mind as of late also but I really don't need anything until next season so it will give me plenty of time to research and save.

Last edited by OrenMc; 09-21-2008 at 12:07 PM.
09-20-2008, 04:56 PM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by roentarre Quote
my experience with that lens is that it has too much purple fringeing to be usable.
Are you sure you are talking about the FA 20/2.8? My copy does exhibit very little purple fringing for an ultra wide lens.

As I feel that some pictures will demonstrate more easily the qualities of this lens, here are some pictures taken with the FA 20/2.8 against the very bright Cambodian sky:















Even in low light, this lens shines:





Cheers!

Abbazz
09-20-2008, 08:50 PM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by Nesster Quote
There's some freeware I forgot the name of that will read through your image files and report out what focal lengths you've used the most.
That'd be Exposure Plot.
Very handy program, especially for this purpose of seeing what focal lengths you use most.
ExposurePlot (former Focalplot)
09-20-2008, 09:05 PM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by Nesster Quote
There's some freeware I forgot the name of that will read through your image files and report out what focal lengths you've used the most. But even without that, shoot what you like how you like with the kit, and keep track of what focal length you tend to favor: that probably will be your most useful prime.
That software is ExposurePlot. Here's the link to it, if you're interested in downloading it:
ExposurePlot (former Focalplot)

Sticking with your kit lens for right now is a good thing. As you're getting better, you may discover that you're needing to back up to get the angle you want. If that's the case, then it's time to start shopping for a wider-angle lens. For your budget, the 16-45/4 would be a good choice. If you decide that you'd like a prime for WA jobs and you can wait until next spring or summer, then Pentax is supposed to be coming out with a DA15/4 Limited lens--a nice compact, well-built piece of glass, based on the other lenses in the same series (DA21, DA35, DA40, and DA70).

HTH,
Heather
09-21-2008, 12:32 AM   #28
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thanks for the link Heather


cheers




Neil
09-21-2008, 08:07 PM   #29
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get a wide angle zoom. you'll figure out which focal length you use the most, and then you can get that focal length (or near) as a prime if you feel so compelled to.
the pentax kit 18-55 is considerably better than other brands' kits
09-22-2008, 01:33 PM   #30
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Inexpensive is my mottos, I like few lens that I have used

1. Pentax DA 18-55 f/3.5-5.6

This is the best value wide angle zoom that you can bet the money on. I regret a bit in selling mine but LBA does strange thing to you when you try to fight it, hence my thoughts for the need in managing LBA



1. Pentax DA 18-55 f/3.5-5.6




1/2 sec, f/4.5, 38mm, iso 200, -1/2 EV, hand-held with K100D



2. Tokina AF 19-35 f/3.5-4.5

This lens can be bought used or new from $100 to $150



2. Tokina AF 19-35 f/3.5-4.5


1/1250, f/4.5, 27mm, iso 200, 0 Ev, with K100D, cropped


1/800 sec, f/6.3, iso 300, -1 Ev, K100D, cropped




3. Spiratone 20mm f/2.8

This can be bought from $40 to $100, I think and it is worth the money.



3. Spiratone 20mm f/2.8


1/8 sec, f/2.8 wide open in iso 400 with K10D


1/8 sec, f/2.8, 20mm, iso 400 with K10D


1/13 sec, f/2.8, 20mm, iso 400, k10D



4. Vivitar 24mm f/2.8 with 'A' (likely from Cosina)

You are likely to get this in the cheap under $50.00



4. Vivitar 24mm f/2.8 with 'A'

1/2000 sec, f/5.0, 24mm, iso 200, 0 Ev, K100D, cropped


1/15 sec, f/2.8, 24mm, iso 800, 0 Ev, K100D, hand-held


My Nighttime Go To Wide Angle

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