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10-30-2008, 05:48 PM   #16
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I like the post 4 better. It is full of truth, one of this forum masterpieces.

10-30-2008, 06:18 PM   #17
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I would agree Gruoso with both of Wheatfield's posts on that thread. But my setup does differ from his in the lens department. I'll use primes during the service but I dislike moving around and firing the flash all the time. So I keep it to a minimum if at all possible. Back in the day when we had LX style viewfinders, MF lenses were easier to use even if the zooms were not good enough back then. Frankly I have had little issue with AF lenses.

He's made some excellent points and I don't dissagree with any of it. We just have different styles and ways of doing things. As for the flash comments, I have 3 AF400T's with Quantum batteries and love that flash. I agree totally with that section.
10-30-2008, 06:52 PM   #18
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I have no experience in wedding except attaining my friend's wedding and pretended as a photog backup. I brought in few lens with K10D
  • Tamron 28-75 f/2.8
  • Komine 135mm f/2.8 in K (MF)
  • Pentax FA 50 f/1.4
  • Spiratone 20mm f/2.8 in K (MF)

And I end up using the first three. The Tamron 28-75 f/2.8 turns out to be the most versatile of all and f/2.8 is needed in my case as I am not the main photographer and flash is out of the question as it interfere the main photog in the event.

And I find the 135mm a good surprise to use as I need to stay further behind the main guys. Use of prime will really slow you down and I still remember sweating behind the camera viewfinder not able to obtain focus for the critical shot.


If I have to do it again as a backup photographer, I will bring the following
  • Tamron 28-75 f/2.8 as main lens
  • Pentax DA* 50-135 f/2.8 as main lens
  • A fast 50mm as in Pentax FA 50 f/1.4 or Cosina 55mm f/1.2
  • Tamron 10-24 f/2.8 for wide angle or something similar to cover wide angle when needed
  • Flash and all accessories

From the fast paste nature of the events, I would prefer zoom to make the shot over the use of prime. But I will prefer the use of prime for the special staged moment for the bride, or some artistic shots of ring, wedding details etc.

Last edited by hinman; 10-30-2008 at 07:06 PM.
10-30-2008, 08:36 PM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by Peter Zack Quote
I would agree Gruoso with both of Wheatfield's posts on that thread. But my setup does differ from his in the lens department. I'll use primes during the service but I dislike moving around and firing the flash all the time. So I keep it to a minimum if at all possible. Back in the day when we had LX style viewfinders, MF lenses were easier to use even if the zooms were not good enough back then. Frankly I have had little issue with AF lenses.

He's made some excellent points and I don't dissagree with any of it. We just have different styles and ways of doing things. As for the flash comments, I have 3 AF400T's with Quantum batteries and love that flash. I agree totally with that section.
I am so sorry about the length of this.

Gee, does this mean I am only a semitroll?
Seriously though, the faster primes allow me to unplug the flash more often (easily done with a PC cord), and I tend to not move around much during the service. I've had many Ministers tell me that I am one of the best photographers they have had at a wedding, simply because they didn't know I was there.
Amazing, since I am a rather oversized 6"3", and 230lb guy.
I've never had complaints about coverage, either.

I always have 2 cameras set up at a wedding. It used to be a couple of k1000s, now it is a K20, and a K10. One camera is in my hand, with the 31/1.8, a 50/1.4 in my pocket, and Metz 60 attached, the other is on a tripod at the back of the church with the 85/1.4 attached.
It starts and ends it's day off to the side of the aisle.
I sit 1 pew back from the front, since the front row is generally family, and on the left side of the aisle. After the processional goes by, I drop to the back of the church and do the rest of the ceremony from the aisle with the tripod mounted camera, and no flash.
A few pictures of the babbling Minister and the ring exchange, and the tripod mounted camera has done it's job.
While the ceremony is happening, I change the 31 out for a 50mm lens, which I will use for the ring exchange and the register signing.
After the register signing, I change out the 50 for the 31 for the recessional.
Sometimes one has to walk and change lenses at the same time.
The speakers are done from wherever is both good and as inconspicuous as possible with the camera in hand, and once the ceremony is over, the register shots are done with that camera as well. All I have to do is make sure that the tripod mounted camera has been moved aside before the recessional.
There isn't really much to take pictures of, most photographers take far to many pictures of the ceremony, and often become pests.
Sometimes we forget that if we get in the way of the ceremony, if we are noticed at all, then we have crossed the line from observer to intruder. It's not enough that we are standing there quietly, not blocking the view if our ugly ass is, in reality, right beside the bride's head to the person three rows back.
On balance, it is better to miss a shot than spoil the day for someone.
Contrary to popular belief, the photographer is not the center of the universe.

The Bride is.

It is rude to trip the shutter while someone is talking. It is rude to trip the shutter during a silence (unless it really has stalled).
Or so I've been told.

The Pentax LX shutter echoes beautifully at the Holy Rosary Cathedral in Regina,SK.
The sound of a very small, bright brass bell.
A beautiful, clean uplifting ring of a sound.

The sound of death when it is your LX.

I discovered this one Saturday afternoon, during what was supposed to be a Pregnant Pause of Drama put on by the Priest.

You are going to be rude. Take the picture while someone is talking. At weddings, what isn't said is often more important than what is said.
Don't spoil the silent moments. They are rare, and should be respected.

What I've found is that AF just doesn't give me the performance that I need. I suspect that the higher level Nikons would do the job, but I use Pentax, so I do what I can.
What I can do is focus manually, or else point focus on where I know someone will be and shoot when they get there.
People don't really move all that fast, in reality.

I found that Pentax flash control returns unreliable TTL exposure with the *istD and the Metz, so I went back to autoflash.
I guess the word support and the term actually works don't mesh in this combination.
Since the K10/K20 don't support analog TTL, I've just stayed with the PC cord and the Metz on Auto.
I don't have a grand to drop on a flash system that may not be as accurate, and will unlikely be more accurate.
I measured my Metz 60 with a flash meter once. It measured accurate to within 1/10 of a stop in 4 different venues and shooting distances ranging from 6 feet to 25 feet.
Beat that, Mr. New Technology......

10-30-2008, 08:46 PM   #20
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Since you know the wedding planner then you should have the chance to preview the venue in detail and know the exact plans. That being the case only YOU will know what lenses you need. Normally a photographer needs to be able to adapt more quickly in which case zooms are a must. 16-50 does the trick 90% of the time but I keep a lens pouch on my hip with the 50-135 so you can stand way at the back and get good shots. I once shot an entire wedding with a 100-300 on a film body. It was cool because they did not even know I was there and the pictures came out really cool. The only prime I would carry is a 31 F1.8 because its a great lens and a full stop faster than the zooms which is nice for dinner/reception stuff in low light.

At a recent event I was shooting I though the biggest group I would have to shoot would have about 15 people. When I got there they wanted a shot with 60 people. Fortunately I had my 16-50 with me and I did the group portrait at 16mm F5.6 and it came out really nice
10-30-2008, 08:57 PM   #21
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Wheatfield, You've gotten the gabbing bug the last couple of days. Another very good post and loved the thoughts on silence as well as the photographer moving around. Very true. I've been to weddings where I was not shooting and if you notice the photographer, then he/she is not doing a very good job.

I've added the Cosina 55mm f1.2 to my bag recently and that lens is so bright, I can focus it in near pitch black (I'm not kidding). I need to test fire it a couple hundred times before putting it to work but so far this lens will see a lot of use.

If I could find an A* or FA* 85mm, well that could easily change my lens choices.
10-31-2008, 04:24 AM   #22
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Did a wedding recently and added the Limiteds to our bag for it. The day ended up being such a rush that the obvious answer (for me that day at least) was to mainly shoot with the K20 and DA* 16-50, with the K10 and DA* 50-135 over the shoulder.

Weddings these days do seem to be far more informal than when I was filming them 20 odd years ago, so being easily adaptable paid dividends that day.
10-31-2008, 10:22 AM   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by roentarre Quote
The truth is that modern day wedding is fast paced photojournalistic style (so called "capturing the moments of the day" style). There is little time to actually compose every shot. Instead, it is more like hit and miss kind of thing.

Being a wedding assist is more about getting shots that main photographer cannot get like guest blunder, funny moments, different angles of the wedding couple and some unsuspecting moments.
this seems to be the new thing, here are two guys who are "up there" ... really nic esetup.
Lancashire Wedding Photographer Jeff Ascough - Documentary wedding photography covering Lancashire, Manchester, Liverpool, Cheshire, the North West, and UK
Riccis Valladares | Fine Art Wedding Photography | Paris, New York, Los Angeles, Miami - this guy just switched back to film, uses 3 M7's on a wedding simple as that

i have no wedding experience, but if you're using AF in a dark area, make sure it's working well.

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