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03-16-2009, 06:15 PM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by hinman Quote
I will pick
  • 16-45 for the landscape & portraits with a wide scenic view
  • FA 31 for the ultimate and night time and indoor shots
  • 55-300 for the birds, people, walk-around

And since the 21 is so small, I will pack it for sure. But I think you need a macro or something good for close up to the beautiful and unfamiliar flowers and the best lunch and dinner plates. The 21 can do that in a pinch. Perhaps, a good close up filter for the 55-300mm or the 16-45 will help.
And don't forget about . . .

Camera Lens Rentals.com

if you want to rent a Macro - or anything else to make the perfect bag.

03-16-2009, 08:02 PM   #17
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It has been a while since we were there, but it somewhat depends when you go and what you do. We spent most of our time with our heads pointed down in the water (snorkeling), so we took along some disposable underwater cameras. I know, the pics are just snapshots, but they are well worth it. BTW - buy them here and take them with you. Bring some extras and you can pay for part of the trip.

I mostly shoot with a 50 prime (35mm) but that and a 200 would cover anything I can think of.

Lots of sand, salt and dirt. Plan to post clean anything you take with you.
03-17-2009, 05:43 AM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by hinman Quote
I will pick
  • 16-45 for the landscape & portraits with a wide scenic view
  • FA 31 for the ultimate and night time and indoor shots
  • 55-300 for the birds, people, walk-around

And since the 21 is so small, I will pack it for sure. But I think you need a macro or something good for close up to the beautiful and unfamiliar flowers and the best lunch and dinner plates. The 21 can do that in a pinch. Perhaps, a good close up filter for the 55-300mm or the 16-45 will help.
Another vote for Hin's picks. I went to Mexico recently and brought the 16-50, the 43, the 77 and the 21.

The 16-50 has the weather seals, which made it ideal for taking shots in/from the ocean, and getting down in the sand with my kids, probably 2/3 of my shots were with that lens. The 21 didn't make it out because the 16-50 did so well at this focal length, so your 16-45 might be a good bet for a general walkaround, getting the people shots with the background intact. I usually shoot more with primes, but am so glad I opted to bring the zoom. It allowed me to get the panoramic views, then close-ups back-to-back.

I had considered the Tamron 28-75 and the 21 as a pairing, but I'm very glad I opted to bring the wider zoom, since I had it on my camera most of the time. I've since sold the 28-75 and the 21 and they were both very sharp.

I used the 77 for some portrait type snaps, and some lizards and (faraway) birds, but something longer would've been nice at times, so your 55-300 would come in handy.

The 43 filled in where your 31 would. Great in low light and indoors, though the 31 would've been my first pick. I'd even use the 31 for flower shots--you're not going to get in anywhere near as close as with a macro, but the sharpness and bokeh make up for it. The 21 focuses extremely close, but the bokeh isn't great for flowers.
03-17-2009, 07:18 AM   #19
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zooms zooms zooms zooms. i hate saying it because I only own the kit lens and 5 primes.

I went to Oahu in early january, with just the kit lens and the 40mm da prime. even then i did a lot of lens changing which was kind of a pain.

Just remember that hawaii receives the most amount of rainfall anywhere in the world, and its surrounded by ocean (ie. salt water) so there will be times where you can not change lenses (unless you do it under your shirt or something).

I dont have experience with most of your lenses so i'm not sure how much i can help with specific choices. I have the 21mm da and 31mm fa and would have loved to bring one of those if i had them at the time. Never tried the 35mm but heard that its much lighter than the 31mm (huge points when hiking) and not much compromise for IQ (and more peace of mind if you have it on your camera and it starts raining hard).

I heard that Maui doesnt have much of a night life (its more nature centered, friends tell me its dead after 10pm) so I'm not sure how much a fast lens would benefit you.

bring some nice primes for the nice days when you want the $ shots.
bring the zooms for the bad weather (for me 3 out of 8 days)

i hope taht helps! sorry i have no real suggestions. enjoy your trip


Last edited by eyou; 03-17-2009 at 07:35 AM.
03-17-2009, 07:20 AM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by shutterbob Quote
Yahoo! - 9 Days in Maui can offer a lot of photo op's. Looking for advice on the best 3-lens arsenal to take on my trip. Don't want to be burdened with all of them. Here's what I have to chose from:

Pentax k10d
Samsung GX20 (probably take this one - a tad better on noise @ hi ISO)

DA-21mm
FA-31 Ltd
FA-35mm
FA-50mm
DA-10/17
DA-16/45mm
TAM- 18/75mm
DA-18/250mm
DA-55-300mm
Kenko 2.0x 7 element Teleconverter

I expect to concentrate on scenics in this order:

1. Landscape - beaches, waterfalls, road scenes
2. Flowers, birds, fauna
3. Archetectural

If any one has the time, I would ever greatful for your views on what 3-lens you would put in your bag given the above.

Thanks,
Bob
I'd take the 18-250, the 10-17, and one of your primes. The "close focusing" capability of the 18-250 is a decent substitute for a macro, at least when you don't want to carry another dedicated lens.

Oh, and take me along to carry the rest of your gear. Seriously, I'm in Houston. I can meet you at the airport (Intergalactic?).
03-17-2009, 07:55 AM   #21
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31 ltd, 16-45, 55-300
03-17-2009, 09:30 AM   #22
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Original Poster
And the winner is...............!

First, let me thank all of you Pentaxians for taking time to give me your thoughts. What a great bunch. You're like a Wikipedia of Pentaxology! Wish you could all go to Maui as a group!

After thoughtful consideration of your comments, I am a little worried about the rain...not so much the sand as I'm not a beach enthusiast except as a romantic place to walk and listen to the waves. No children to kick and throw the sand around (my girles have got kids of their own now so I'll let them go to the beach without me). But I do love the forests, mountains, trails, falls, and of course the people. So, I'll make sure I have my waterproof Tamrac bag with me and keep everything tucked away during the rains. Thanks for the heads-up on that.

For me the winning combo is: (notice I chose 4 instead of 3 - with the small size and weight of the 21mm & 35mm, I think I can squeeze em all in)

DA 21 - Light, easy to store and terrific for the landscape and panoramic as well as other quick shots that require shoe sole zooming. It's hard not to get a good photo with the 21 as long as there is sufficient light; and that stubby profile makes it an ideal knock about when you're snapshotting and not waxing artfully......(is that a good word?)

FA 35 - Another remarkable walkabout that's a little faster at 2.0 and can render some pretty nice low light shots for twilight and early dawn shooting. Lighter than the 31mm Ltd and much cheaper to replace if I drop it down the ravine[/. Not much sacrifice in terms of image quality either. Some reviewers opine that it's resolving power is close if not equivalent to the 31mm Ltd. Anthing that close to the Ltd should be OK for the purpose intended, huh.

DA 16/45 - Best quality consumer walk around zoom I've ever used for daylight photography. Good in many circumstances from super wide to moderate tele. Doesn't give up much to the primes in terms of sharpness. A little on the slow side at 4.0, but a great performer.

DA 55/300 - This seems to be the solution for that long shot where you need some detail and shoe sole zooming just won't get you there. It can kind of double as a "faux" macro when I need it. I've been surprised at the excellent image quality of this low cost Pentax tele. A real performer in decent light. I might even stick the Kenko 2x MC7 converter in my pocket......just in case.

Again, thanks kindly for your advice. I think you have given me the best advice available.

Cheers,

Bob
03-17-2009, 10:26 AM   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by shutterbob Quote
Yahoo! - 9 Days in Maui can offer a lot of photo op's. Looking for advice on the best 3-lens arsenal to take on my trip. Don't want to be burdened with all of them. Here's what I have to chose from:

Pentax k10d
Samsung GX20 (probably take this one - a tad better on noise @ hi ISO)

DA-21mm
FA-31 Ltd
FA-35mm
FA-50mm
DA-10/17
DA-16/45mm
TAM- 18/75mm
DA-18/250mm
DA-55-300mm
Kenko 2.0x 7 element Teleconverter

I expect to concentrate on scenics in this order:

1. Landscape - beaches, waterfalls, road scenes
2. Flowers, birds, fauna
3. Archetectural

If any one has the time, I would ever greatful for your views on what 3-lens you would put in your bag given the above.

Thanks,
Bob
My take from your list of lenses would be
DA 16-45
DA 55-300
FA 50

The 16-45 covers the best scenic range. There will probably be times when you would like something wider, but when we went to Maui some years back to visit my brother and his wife, I had nothing wider than a 28, and it was pretty good coverage. Maybe I just didn't know any better. My kit then was KX, 28/3.5, 55/1.8, 70-210 and 1.4X.

The 55-300 can give you some good close ups of the birds. On our trip, I found the birds were not overly shy, but a bit more than 300 on film was not ideal. The 300 on digital would be better. I shot Fuji 100 slide film, so cropping after the fact was not a very good option.

The 50 will cover the night scenes when you attend a luau. The portrait reach would be great then. The 16-45 would be usable in that situation as well, and could serve very well for flowers with the shallow depth of field to set them off. The bramalea are spectacular. They are big, so you don't need macro. I found my 55 on film more than adequate.

[Edit] I see that you have made your selection. It looks as if a lot of us think just about the same. I picked your 50 partly because it fit half way between the 16-45 long end and the 55-300 short end, plus the speed for late night shots. You will have a great time with the kit you chose. Enjoy!


Last edited by Canada_Rockies; 03-17-2009 at 10:32 AM. Reason: Added note about final selection
03-17-2009, 10:50 AM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by shutterbob Quote
FA 35 - Another remarkable walkabout that's a little faster at 2.0 and can render some pretty nice low light shots for twilight and early dawn shooting. Lighter than the 31mm Ltd and much cheaper to replace if I drop it down the ravine[/. Not much sacrifice in terms of image quality either. Some reviewers opine that it's resolving power is close if not equivalent to the 31mm Ltd. Anthing that close to the Ltd should be OK for the purpose intended, huh.


Bob
Bob, I can concur all your choices especially packing the 21mm. You can alternate a lighter two lens setup out of four depending on subject and lighting

combo choices of dual lens
  • 21mm and 55-300mm
  • 16-45mm alone for hiking
  • 16-45mm and 55-300mm
  • FA 35 (or better FA 31) for nigh time, lounge, cocktail, hula dancing etc.

I am surprised that you take the FA 35 instead of FA 31mm. My friend, life is short, and you have the best prime lens that money can buy, I will bring the 31 if I were you to add enjoyment for the trip. Why sweat breaking the lens if you already have a backup of FA 35 at home. We buy lens to enjoy it in a photo that preserves wonderful memory -- I call that priceless. Any traveling insurance that can be bought for the unthinkable?

We are sharing your excitement for sure! Thank you for the sharing!
Hin
03-17-2009, 11:44 AM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by shutterbob Quote
After thoughtful consideration of your comments, I am a little worried about the rain...not so much the sand as I'm not a beach enthusiast except as a romantic place to walk and listen to the waves. No children to kick and throw the sand around (my girles have got kids of their own now so I'll let them go to the beach without me). But I do love the forests, mountains, trails, falls, and of course the people. So, I'll make sure I have my waterproof Tamrac bag with me and keep everything tucked away during the rains. Thanks for the heads-up on that.
Sand may not be an issue, but if you're planning on getting to the shoreline on the windward side, you can plan on some nice pulverized volcanic rock blowing around. Don't be discouraged though. Some of those areas are the most stunning and bizarre landscapes around.
03-17-2009, 03:43 PM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by shutterbob Quote
...After thoughtful consideration of your comments, I am a little worried about the rain...not so much the sand as I'm not a beach enthusiast except as a romantic place to walk and listen to the waves. No children to kick and throw the sand around (my girles have got kids of their own now so I'll let them go to the beach without me). But I do love the forests, mountains, trails, falls, and of course the people. So, I'll make sure I have my waterproof Tamrac bag with me and keep everything tucked away during the rains. Thanks for the heads-up on that.
Rain in Hawai'i is highly variable depending on what part of the island you're on and what time of year it is. The north and east sides of each island get a lot of rain, particularily from about November to March. The south and west parts get almost no rain, sometimes as little as 1/20th as much as on the wet side. There are some spots where the local microclimate and geography make it rain almost all the time.

When you go, where you stay and what you do will greatly influence the amount of rain you'll see. That's why some visitors will warn about rain and some will say "what rain?"
03-17-2009, 04:38 PM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by shutterbob Quote
I am a little worried about the rain...
If it's raining, just drive to the other side of the island. (This advice doesn't work 100% of the time, but it does work more often than not.)

IMHO, anyone who goes to Hawaii and doesn't spend at least a day or two snorkeling is missing one of Hawaii's biggest attractions. The last time we went to Hawaii, underwater housings cost a fortune - so when we arrived I bought a disposable underwater camera. It worked OK, and I'm really glad I did it, but if I was to do it today I'd buy a waterproof compact camera to take along.

If you go snorkeling, it will be one of your best memories. And if you don't bring a camera along for the swim, you'll regret it.
03-17-2009, 05:10 PM   #28
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I second what Sean said on two accounts.

Snorkeling is amazing. It was definitely one of the highlights for me. One of the most memorable things for me was actually hearing the humpback whales singing with my own ears.

When we went we took disposable cameras with us. If we could have, I would have bought one of the waterproof cameras from Pentax or Olympus. There's nothing like the freedom and instant review of digital.
03-17-2009, 11:14 PM   #29
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There are some fine recommendations for lenses here, so I;m not going to cover that. Have you given a thought to your other equipment.

I would recommend a light tripod if you're going up to Haleakala. Even if it's a gorillapod, you can still put it on the wall at the upper lookout and it will help if your looking for sunrise or sunset photos. I would also recommend going up for the sunset as well as the sunrise. Just watch out for the cows on the drive in the dark. The last 10 miles before you reach the park entrance is an open cattle range so it's not uncommon to see cattle standing in the middle of the road in the dark.

Take care and have fun. Maui is beautiful pretty much all year round.
03-18-2009, 09:41 AM   #30
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QuoteOriginally posted by HawaiianOnline Quote
I would recommend a light tripod if you're going up to Haleakala.
Also warm clothing, especially to see the sunrise. At 10,000 feet the air is 20 degrees Celsius cooler than at sea level (that's almost 40 degrees Fahrenheit!) When my wife and I went up in the pre-dawn hours we wore sweaters and thick jackets and were nice and comfortable, but there were some people in shorts and tank tops that were having a pretty miserable time of it.
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