Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
03-30-2009, 09:02 AM   #1
Site Supporter




Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Dexter, Michigan
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 53
Cleaning with Eclipse

Not sure where best to post this. Since this is about cleaning lenses, I thought this would work..

I've read that Eclipse cleaning solution is good for lenses etc, dries quickly and leaves no smears, etc. But many retailers of this say that the Eclipse E2 formula for sensors, is not recommended for cleaning lenses or critical optics.

Any one know why E2 not recommended for lenses? Any harm in using it on lenses, coatings?

I ask, because the traditional lens cleaning solutions I try do leave smears, and I have a bottle of E2 for my sensor, but I hesitate on spending another $10 for 2oz of solution if the E2 is safe to use on lenses.

Comments please?

03-30-2009, 10:02 AM   #2
Senior Member




Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Prince George, British Columbia, Canada.
Posts: 129
Don't spend a lot of time cleaning your lenses the more you touch the elements to more marks you will make, it takes a lot of grime to make your images look bad. Finep articles of grit will ruin any coating no matter what make. A good quality UV filter is your best bet at keeping your lens scratch free some will not agree but it's your choice.
03-30-2009, 10:37 AM   #3
Pentaxian
philbaum's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Port Townsend, Washington State, USA
Posts: 3,659
QuoteOriginally posted by BCtoad Quote
Don't spend a lot of time cleaning your lenses the more you touch the elements to more marks you will make, it takes a lot of grime to make your images look bad. Finep articles of grit will ruin any coating no matter what make. A good quality UV filter is your best bet at keeping your lens scratch free some will not agree but it's your choice.
I think thats true. I bought one of these lens pens. And actually the most use i get out of it is that brush.

My brother is an optical dispenser for folks glasses and contacts. Before that he worked in labs from Army days, grinding lenses. Very insistent, if you have to clean lenses, that one uses a damp cloth first to remove the rocks. Moving rocks around on the lens is a sure way to scratch them. A lot of lens cleaning solutions are just wanter or water with a touch of alcohol for degreasing. Coatings, years ago, were just varnish coatings. I don't know what's in eclipse but anything that removes or softens the varnish coating is not good.

These days, i just don't find it necessary to clean my lens faces, but if i did, a soft damp micro fleece or cotton cloth would be the best thing, with a touch of alcohol to remove grease. But shouldn't have to be done often, if at all.

Phil
03-31-2009, 07:54 AM   #4
Site Supporter




Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Dexter, Michigan
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 53
Original Poster
The OFFICIAL Word

Joel from Photographic Solutions called me back and said that there was initially some question to the use of E2 on lenses, but it has since been proved that the retailers' statements, "E2 is NOT to be used on lenses or critical optics," is "simply not the case." "E2 is perfectly safe to use for claning lenses and other optics... there should be no problem using E2 for those purposes."

I will also keep in mind what the other 2 replies stated, that the less the lens itself is touched, the better.

I have a case here where I have a Sakar UV filter, that looks perfectly clean, over a lens. However this UV filter makes a noticeable bluish cast and reduces the contrast of the lens. Either its a bad filter or has some sort of film build-up thats not detectable. I am sometimes hesitant about using filters such as UV or sky-light, especially if they're not coated, because they can add flare and detract from the lens' initial IQ. Some of these "better" quality coated filters cost as much as some of my lenses. So I need to find a good balance.

03-31-2009, 08:51 AM   #5
Pentaxian
Wheatfield's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: The wheatfields of Canada
Posts: 10,132
QuoteOriginally posted by drjaxon Quote

I have a case here where I have a Sakar UV filter, that looks perfectly clean, over a lens. However this UV filter makes a noticeable bluish cast and reduces the contrast of the lens. Either its a bad filter or has some sort of film build-up thats not detectable. I am sometimes hesitant about using filters such as UV or sky-light, especially if they're not coated, because they can add flare and detract from the lens' initial IQ. Some of these "better" quality coated filters cost as much as some of my lenses. So I need to find a good balance.
For me, the best balance is to not use "protective" filters. It doesn't matter what quality of filter you are using, it will degrade the image. It might be lowered contrast, more flare, lowered resolution, or reflections off the sensor.
They all are guilty of lowering quality in some way in some circumstances.
A far better solution is to use lens hoods, which will protect the front of the lens almost as well as a filter, and introduces real flare reduction as well.
Some of my lenses are valued in the thousands of dollars, I'm not about to bugger up the fine imaging qualities I paid for when I spent that kind of money by putting a cheap piece of glass on the front of the lens.

The quality of an optical system is only as good as the lowest quality component.
A two thousand dollar lens + a 20 dollar filter = a 20 dollar filter as far as image quality is concerned.

As far as cleaning goes, I rarely clean my lenses, and when I do, it's generally with old cotton t-shirt material and vapour from my breath. More lenses are damaged by excessive cleaning than any other single reason.
03-31-2009, 12:54 PM   #6
Veteran Member
Ben_Edict's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: SouthWest "Regio"
Photos: Albums
Posts: 3,303
QuoteOriginally posted by drjaxon Quote
Joel from Photographic Solutions called me back and said that there was initially some question to the use of E2 on lenses, but it has since been proved that the retailers' statements, "E2 is NOT to be used on lenses or critical optics," is "simply not the case." "E2 is perfectly safe to use for claning lenses and other optics... there should be no problem using E2 for those purposes."
And there is no reason, why anybody would feel Eclips unsafe for lenses. The main component is (to my knowledge) isopropylene. I have still stock of the old (original) Eclipse solution and it does what it promises: evaporates completely without leaving any residue.

Nevertheless for lens cleaning, if necessary at all, I prefer the ProPhot wet cleaning tissues. These contain another mixture of alcohol, which leave a slight n"nano-coating" on the lens (you cann see the tell-tale Newtonian figures). This stuff is wonderfull and gets even rid of sea salt or whatever clings stubbornly to the lens. I have been using it for at least 20 years now and never had any problems with it. These tissues were tested many years ago by a German pro magazine, including measurements of MTF before and after cleaning and they found evidence, that the nano-coating (this definition did not exist, when these tissues came onto the market) actually improved MTF with some lenses (I guess MC dependent).

QuoteOriginally posted by drjaxon Quote
I will also keep in mind what the other 2 replies stated, that the less the lens itself is touched, the better.
Ofcourse the first step in lens cleaning is a simple Rocket blower, the very best thing. The next would be a dedicated brush to clean off any remaining hard particles. And only after this has been throroughly finished any tissues, wipe pads etc. should be used to reduce the risk of scratching.

In the 30 years I am into photography I never have seen a scratch on the lens caused by sensible cleaning. Modern optical coatings are quite hard and protect the lens surface efficiently. And that was true even before the latest Pentax SD coating...

Anyway: cleaning should only be necessary if your are really shooting in very dirty conditions or when a contamination could be a hazard to the lens in the longer term (sea spray, finger prints etc.).

QuoteOriginally posted by drjaxon Quote
I have a case here where I have a Sakar UV filter, that looks perfectly clean, over a lens. However this UV filter makes a noticeable bluish cast and reduces the contrast of the lens. Either its a bad filter or has some sort of film build-up thats not detectable. I am sometimes hesitant about using filters such as UV or sky-light, especially if they're not coated, because they can add flare and detract from the lens' initial IQ. Some of these "better" quality coated filters cost as much as some of my lenses. So I need to find a good balance.
Sakar is not known to me as a manufacturer of filters - they just brand whatever they bought on the market (like Hama). So the quality might vary in accordance with the current source, they get their filters from. If you already see IQ degradation
it is time to discard that filter. In my own experience, high-quality multi-coated filters do not influence the final image to a degree, that the inevitable degradation would be visible. Only exception would be the increased flaring when shooting directly into light sources. Very good filters at very reasonable cost can be found by Kenko (the brand name of Hoya on the Japanese home market). The Pro 1 Digital series is nicely made (in fact the same as the Hoya series with the same designation) and very affordable.

Ben
03-31-2009, 02:11 PM   #7
Veteran Member
Buddha Jones's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Charlotte, NC
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,591
Get a lens pen.
03-31-2009, 04:51 PM   #8
Veteran Member
creampuff's Avatar

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Singapore
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 3,955
Simple over the counter isopropyl alcohol that's available at the drugstore or pharmacy is both cheap and effective as a cleaning solution and leaves no residue. Most commercial cleaning solutions have isopropyl alcohol present, except they charge you plenty because you pay for the brand name and marketing.

I caution the use of the Lens Pen. When new it works fine because it picks up the oils/smears onto its tip. However used over time the embedded particles present on the tip can act as an abrasive. A few people I know who have used it have had fine scratches on the glass surface. The issue is when to dispose of it and get a fresh one.

Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
e2, eclipse, k-mount, lenses, pentax lens, slr lens, smears, solution
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Eclipse standard or E2 cleaning fluid for k100D and k20D? raider Pentax Camera and Field Accessories 1 12-24-2008 03:47 PM
Eclipse Techiechick Monthly Photo Contests 0 03-20-2008 03:58 PM
Cleaning K10D Sensor with Eclipse pentaxbling Pentax DSLR Discussion 2 09-05-2007 01:39 AM
Eclipse Bramela Post Your Photos! 7 08-29-2007 05:11 AM
No Eclipse... Adam Post Your Photos! 1 03-06-2007 03:01 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:19 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top