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06-06-2009, 06:43 PM   #1
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Question about DA10-17 (picture included)

Guys wondering if I can get your take on this. I have found with my new DA 10-17 whenever shooting the sky (most not everytime) I am getting this effect where half the sky is the right color the rest is washed. See photo.



Is this normal?? Next question how the heck can I fix it if it is common?? I like this and few photos where the sky is so uneven (color wise)

Thanks in advance

06-06-2009, 07:00 PM   #2
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With such wide coverage, some the shot is pointing toward the sun, the other away from it, so you see the normal gradation of blue in the sky.
06-06-2009, 07:55 PM   #3
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I don't know that you could fix this problem in-camera (I sometimes see something similar, but not as pronounced, with the 12-24), but you could probably use Photoshop's graduated tool to get the lighter side to match the darker side better.
06-06-2009, 08:19 PM   #4
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If you look directly at the sun during the day, the brightness is overwhelming. Turn 180 degrees and the brightness is not so strong.

The fisheye's super-wide angle of view can capture far more of the sky than most lenses. This means that during the day time, if you don't frame the shot carefully, you'll end up framing both the brightest and the relatively normal brightest portions of the sky.

And, generally speaking, with increasing exposure comes decreasing color saturation.

Basically, your fisheye is acting normally. This is something you'll need to work around or accept.

06-06-2009, 08:37 PM   #5
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Thanks Guys. I figured it had to do with the angle and now have to work with it. Thanks
06-06-2009, 08:42 PM   #6
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As apractical exercise, meter the sky using spot mode in all directions within your scene and see for yourself what variations you can expect before you take a shot. Two or three exercises will make you knowledgable as to what to expect.

Corrections are difficult as they affect the foreground as well. In rare situations a polarizer filter can "correct" the sky without affecting the foreground in a noticeable way but that's an art of its own and very dependent on the scene.

Most knowledgeable viewers would expect this sky-effect -- and if you learn to correct it they will consider you one of the select few!

H2

H2
06-06-2009, 09:52 PM   #7
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I've never tried it but I wonder if having the sun at your back would make a difference.
06-09-2009, 12:26 PM   #8
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here are 2 shots

one with the morning sun on the left side, and one with the sun on my back. at 10mm, the lens captures the sky gradients in a dramatic way... I like that.


Last edited by truonganh; 11-06-2012 at 09:45 PM.
06-11-2009, 10:01 AM   #9
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Pat:

Does the 10-17 accept filters? (I forget) If it does, would a graduated ND filter help you out? The one I have for the 12-24 works quite well, rotates similar to a CP filter so you can compensate for the lightest part of the sky.

NaCl(if it doesn't take filters the jury will ignore the previous statement)H2O
06-11-2009, 10:06 AM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by NaClH2O Quote
Pat:

Does the 10-17 accept filters? (I forget) If it does, would a graduated ND filter help you out? The one I have for the 12-24 works quite well, rotates similar to a CP filter so you can compensate for the lightest part of the sky.

NaCl(if it doesn't take filters the jury will ignore the previous statement)H2O
no it doesn't.
06-12-2009, 01:59 PM   #11
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You can get a 58mm filter to attach to it but it will vignette at the widest parts.
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