Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
06-27-2009, 05:04 PM   #1
Veteran Member
GerryL's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: CA
Posts: 2,731
Vivitar 70-300mm macro 1:4X

I just acquired this particular lens.
It is an "A" lens Vivitar 70-300mm one touch zoom with macro. 55mm filter mount.
It says 1:4X macro but I can't seem to figure out how does the macro work on this lens.
It is manual focus by the way and I got it in almost good condition.
It also has a slight..almost unnoticable fungus (I think) or smudge on the back lens inside. Maybe the former owner dismantled it and didn't do a good job at cleaning.
Anyway, does anyone have an idea as to how the macro should work?
It came with the original box but unfortunately no manual.
I'll post pictures of the lens at a later time.

06-27-2009, 05:56 PM   #2
Veteran Member
heatherslightbox's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Gainesville, FL
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,595
If you're referring to the f4.2-5.8 version, I've got the same lens that I just recently got and I haven't been able to figure out how to do the macro, either, leading me to believe that it's really not a macro at all. Mine actually came with a little booklet, but all the information it provides is a diagram of the lens pointing out the different functions on it. According to the booklet, the minimum focusing distance is 4.92 ft--definitely not macro territory.

HTH,
Heather
06-27-2009, 09:22 PM   #3
Veteran Member




Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: NJ, USA
Photos: Albums
Posts: 1,270
Many lenses that have "macro" in their names aren't really "macro" IMO... I suppose there isn't anything other than consumer incredululity to preclude a manufacturer to label any lens as "macro".

Here's a snippet from Wikipedia:

"In recent years, the term macro has been used in marketing material to mean being able to focus on a subject close enough so that when a regular 64 inch (1510 cm) print is made, the image is life-size or larger. With 35mm film this requires a magnification ratio of only approximately 1:4, which demands less of lens quality than 1:1."
06-28-2009, 01:36 PM   #4
Veteran Member
GerryL's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: CA
Posts: 2,731
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by hwblanks Quote
If you're referring to the f4.2-5.8 version, I've got the same lens that I just recently got and I haven't been able to figure out how to do the macro, either, leading me to believe that it's really not a macro at all. Mine actually came with a little booklet, but all the information it provides is a diagram of the lens pointing out the different functions on it. According to the booklet, the minimum focusing distance is 4.92 ft--definitely not macro territory.

HTH,
Heather
Yes, this is the one I got.
It actually had a small mechanical defect when I got it 'coz the metal thing that gets tripped to open the aperture was disconnected somehow.
I was able to dismantle it and figure out how everything was connected.
Anyway, it is now good as new now.
So, what the booklet is saying is that at the very end of the zoom range where the macro label is, that is where the macro focus is (around 4.92).
I actually kinda tried this yesterday before I posted and tried to see if that actually was what the "macro" they were talking about but I wasn't sure that is why I asked.

06-28-2009, 01:39 PM   #5
Veteran Member
GerryL's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: CA
Posts: 2,731
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by flippedgazelle Quote
Many lenses that have "macro" in their names aren't really "macro" IMO... I suppose there isn't anything other than consumer incredululity to preclude a manufacturer to label any lens as "macro".

Here's a snippet from Wikipedia:

"In recent years, the term macro has been used in marketing material to mean being able to focus on a subject close enough so that when a regular 64 inch (1510 cm) print is made, the image is life-size or larger. With 35mm film this requires a magnification ratio of only approximately 1:4, which demands less of lens quality than 1:1."
I guess that must be it then, 'coz I was familiar with the other types of macro where you had to close focus.
In a Tamron 28-210mm before when I was using film on a nikon, there was a kinda of a lock on the lens at the end of the focusing, then you had to push and pull a bit for macro..but it was close focusing.
06-28-2009, 01:43 PM   #6
Veteran Member
GerryL's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: CA
Posts: 2,731
Original Poster
Hey hwblanks, how's your copy of this lens?
I haven't actually played with it much yet but it looks kinda sharp from the first test photos I took (trying to figure out the macro and testing when I fixed it).
Have you tested yours quite a bit?
06-28-2009, 01:52 PM   #7
Veteran Member
GerryL's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: CA
Posts: 2,731
Original Poster
I see that you are selling your copy.
My copy looks slightly different from what you have as mine looks like it's an older version.
The rubber on the focusing/zoom ring is crosshatched like the usual old lens style while your copy is kinda just a little ribbed and smooth on top.
Anyway, I would think the lens is the same.
06-28-2009, 06:30 PM   #8
Veteran Member
heatherslightbox's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Gainesville, FL
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,595
QuoteOriginally posted by GerryL Quote
So, what the booklet is saying is that at the very end of the zoom range where the macro label is, that is where the macro focus is (around 4.92).
That's what I'm assuming. That was the only figure it gave for a MFD.

I tested it a little and I figured out that I like my DA55-300 better. As for the film camera, if I need more length, I can always put my 1.7x TC on it and effectively have 170mm. Under normal circumstances, I don't shoot a lot over that length, anyhow. As for the macro part, I'll most likely pick up a Raynox 150 macro converter and put it on the front of the 55-300 when I'm shooting with either of the digital bodies.

Heather

06-29-2009, 02:20 PM   #9
Veteran Member
GerryL's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: CA
Posts: 2,731
Original Poster
Haha..if I already had the DA 55-300mm I wouldn't have bothered with the Vivtar, but so far I'm going with old glass as my new money isn't compatible with the DA 55-300mm..hehe.
I myself use the Raynox DCR-250. I'm happy with it but may still purchase the Raynox DCR-150 too.
Depends on what else old lens I can get that might have macro.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
70-300mm, k-mount, lens, macro, pentax lens, slr lens, vivitar
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
For Sale - Sold: Vivitar 100mm f/2.8 Macro 1:1 Manual Focus PKA OR Vivitar Series 1 Macro yyyzzz Sold Items 6 10-22-2009 05:18 AM
For Sale - Sold: Vivitar 90mm f2.8 macro (1:1); vivitar series 1 70-210mm (ver. 3); and Tam 2x jkglogau Sold Items 10 10-06-2009 06:32 PM
For Sale - Sold: Vivitar 100mm f/2.8 Macro 1:1 Manual Focus PKA Same optics as Vivitar Series jjdgti Sold Items 10 10-05-2009 05:19 AM
For Sale - Sold: Vivitar 70-300mm/4.2-5.8 MC "macro" heatherslightbox Sold Items 7 07-05-2009 07:55 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:57 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top