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07-08-2009, 08:49 PM   #1
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Utilizing Old K mount and Bayonet Mount Lenses

I have a question. Those that are currently using the old glass, K mount and bayonet mounts...

How do you set these lenses up on a K200d or K20d? So that it meters and so that you can then take the picture. When I had previously tried it just gave a --- where the shutter speed/aperature is normally given.

I believe the lens I'm looking at does not have an "A" on the aperature settings. Just 2.5-22. Its here - Pentax Lens Review Database - 135mm F2.5

07-08-2009, 09:03 PM   #2
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First off, you need to enable the aperture ring. On my GX-10: Settings -> Custom2 Menu -> Use Aperture Ring -> On

Then you're either going to be in Aperture Priority or Manual mode. Use the Green Button to take a meter reading, which theoretically will set the shutter speed correctly.

Theoretically. The problem is that these cameras don't meter well using pre-A lenses. Tons of information about this around the forums, but nothing that I find satisfying.

I love my Pentax-M and my Takumar lenses, but they won't work automatically. I need to take an exposure, review the histogram, and adjust to the exposure I want. The glass is still great, though.
07-08-2009, 09:10 PM   #3
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Read the Sticky post at the top of the Beginner's Forum about metering with manual lenses on a DSLR.
07-08-2009, 09:13 PM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by JonPB Quote

I love my Pentax-M and my Takumar lenses, but they won't work automatically. I need to take an exposure, review the histogram, and adjust to the exposure I want. The glass is still great, though.
I use separate, handheld meters. Less complicated, more flexibility & accuracy.

07-09-2009, 06:15 AM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by raymeedc Quote
I use separate, handheld meters. Less complicated, more flexibility & accuracy.
+1

Yep. Me too. Old school Norwood Director.


Now get off my lawn!
07-09-2009, 07:01 AM   #6
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the use of a K200 or K20 may make a difference in the metering. K10/K20 cameras have a specific issue which I believe is much worse than other cameras.

the lens you indicated, the 135 F2.5 specifically, and any lens F2.8 and faster pose specific problems to the metering.

From my tests, my 135 F2.5 on a K10/20 under exposes -1/2 stop wide open , correct metering at F2.8 and F4, then tending to over expose by 1-2 stops at F5.6 and above. Specifically +1 at F5.6 and F32 and rising up to +2 at about F11.

the reason I say fast lenses are a problem is because they under expose wide open (an F1.4 is much worse even) but over expose beyond F5.6. Slower lenses, you can generally get away with exposure compensation of 1 stop (i.e. deliberately under expose) and you will always be close, but for fast lenses this gives a problem.

On the bright side, you could put an *istD screen into the K10D (they fit) and metering is much better, See my post below.



https://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/241716-post69.html
07-09-2009, 09:48 AM   #7
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I'll second Lowell's recommendation of the *ist D focusing screen. I installed an LL-60 screen on my K10 and the metering is well within post processing tweaks now, no matter what aperture I meter at. I should mention that I find that EVERY lens needs a bit of PP tweaking of exposure.
09-02-2009, 11:42 AM   #8
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Correct Exposure With Manual Lenses

Hello Friends, as a Pentaxian old timer who has used a variety of film cameras: SLRs - both M42 thread and bayonet mounts; TLRs - Yashica and a Rolleiflex; Rangefinders - leica; and many other plain 35mms, our technique was simple. Stick the film cutout with the ASA and exposure values in Sun, Shade, cloudy etc. Just look up at the sky, gauge the lighting, set the aperture and speed and shoot. 90% of the time we were spot one. It then became second nature. Never needed the film cutout - which I still have. Call it powers of the mind.
With manual lenses on my K20D I still follow the old film cut out principle and still get 90% correct exposures. Remember film was costlier, but digital is cheaper, so friends bracket and shoot away, old film cutout style. Throwaway all the meters, the sophisticated metering system and move to manual mode with the powers of your mind. My Granny could tell the time looking at the sky. She wore no watches.
Nanhi.

09-02-2009, 11:50 AM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by nanhi Quote
Hello Friends, as a Pentaxian old timer who has used a variety of film cameras: SLRs - both M42 thread and bayonet mounts; TLRs - Yashica and a Rolleiflex; Rangefinders - leica; and many other plain 35mms, our technique was simple. Stick the film cutout with the ASA and exposure values in Sun, Shade, cloudy etc. Just look up at the sky, gauge the lighting, set the aperture and speed and shoot. 90% of the time we were spot one. It then became second nature. Never needed the film cutout - which I still have. Call it powers of the mind.
With manual lenses on my K20D I still follow the old film cut out principle and still get 90% correct exposures. Remember film was costlier, but digital is cheaper, so friends bracket and shoot away, old film cutout style. Throwaway all the meters, the sophisticated metering system and move to manual mode with the powers of your mind. My Granny could tell the time looking at the sky. She wore no watches.
Nanhi.
never in a million years will I give up my Sekonic. however, when im doing street photography (even with digital) I often do this very thing. I do it as practice, because this is the method I use with my MX and my SV (the SV having no meter at all). something I picked up from watching video footage of Garry Winogrand. I just do a rough gauge of the available light and adjust the shutter-speed on the fly. usually going between 1/30 and 1/500 of a second. on occasion 1/1000. after some practice its actually very easy to do, even with a digital SLR. two strokes of the e-dial left or right and I jump between traditional shutter-speeds, without ever looking at the camera or in the viewfinder. however.... using my Takumars, Av is far easier and quicker.
08-14-2010, 09:53 AM   #10
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Oh no Seamius Sir, please do keep the Sekonic, it is such a cult thing. Here are the settings from my 40 year old 35mm film carton exposure guide. I reproduce it here for a lot of my younger Pentaxian friends. This really work folks:-
AT 100 ASA AND 1 / 250 SEC SET APERTURE AS SHOWN:-
Bright Sun, Sea Sunny Day Hazy Sun Cloudy Bright Cloudy Day
Shore, Snow or Light
Sand Scapes
f 16 f 11 f 8 f 5.6 f 4
NOTE: 1) These exposures apply for ambient light (2) Hours after Sunrise and (2) Hours before Sunset
2) At 200 ASA push the speed up to1/500 sec and so on.
08-14-2010, 09:57 AM   #11
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I still use "Sunny 16" as a quick set with the manual lenses (and sometimes the DA ones too), but I often use spot meter with the 400 because of the lighting problems of a bird in a bush. If I know the bird is out in the ambient lighting, no problems, but when they are in partial cover, it is sometimes (not always) difficult to figure out just what the lighting is in there.
08-15-2010, 01:30 AM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by jk333 Quote
I have a question. Those that are currently using the old glass, K mount and bayonet mounts...
It seems to have been left to me to be the pedant here......K mount is a bayonet mount. You probably meant to say "K mount and screwmounts".
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