Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
10-06-2009, 07:30 AM   #1
New Member




Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: New jersey
Posts: 3
Macro lens question

Hi All,

New to the forum, and somewhat new to photography. I have a K200D, which I like very much, and two zoom lenses (DA 18-55, and DA 50-200). Given my inexperience both of these are fine for me, but I am becoming a bit interested in a macro lens. If I could buy one, what would be a good choice? Since I am on a limted budget, I will most likely look for a used lens in top condition, but I still want to be able to get the most lens for my money.

Thanks in advance for any advice.
John

10-06-2009, 07:33 AM   #2
Senior Member
Sew-Classic's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Ohio, USA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 215
Limited Budget?? How about one of the Raynox conversion lenses??

https://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/pentax-slr-lens-discussion/74221-raynox-macro-club.html
10-06-2009, 08:10 AM   #3
Veteran Member
kristoffon's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Brazil
Posts: 532
The Vivitar macro lenses are outstanding quality, easily available too. Look for the 100-105mm, f/2.8 models. I have one and am very happy.

Last edited by kristoffon; 10-06-2009 at 08:16 AM.
10-06-2009, 10:21 AM   #4
New Member




Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Madison, WI
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 5
Hi,
I was looking for the same thing last year. If you're on a really tight budget, you can get an old K or M 50mm f/4 for ~100 bucks. They only have 1:2 magnification, and you have to get pretty close to the subject, but the picture quality should be really good. (I actually got a screw mount SMC Takumar, which are a little more, and need an adapter, but I'm now collecting a set of Takumars). I find it to be great for flowers, textures, etc.
Brian

10-06-2009, 11:20 AM   #5
Pentaxian




Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Alameda, CA
Posts: 3,194
There is one currently listed in this forum: Sigma 50mm Macro F/2.8

It can also be used as a portrait lens.
10-06-2009, 12:11 PM   #6
Veteran Member
netuser's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Azores Islands, Portugal
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,241
With available money get Pentax DFA 100mm/2, great performer for macro and also portrait lens.

With a small budget get an inversor ring to the kit lens and you will get more then 1:1 macro images.

10-06-2009, 01:29 PM   #7
Veteran Member




Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Saint-Petersburg, Russia
Photos: Albums
Posts: 410
QuoteOriginally posted by netuser Quote
With available money get Pentax DFA 100mm/2, great performer for macro and also portrait lens.

With a small budget get an inversor ring to the kit lens and you will get more then 1:1 macro images.

Quick correction, there is no DFA 100mm 1:2, its1:2.8. There is a Zeiss Makro-Planar ( i think it is Makro-Planar ) 100mm 1:2 but its a bit out of OP's league

And as to macro lens I`d try to hunt down either Bokina 90mm or Vivitar 105 2.8 that has been already mentioned here.
10-06-2009, 02:53 PM   #8
Site Supporter
Douglas_of_Sweden's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Stockholm
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 3,347
QuoteOriginally posted by netuser Quote
With available money get Pentax DFA 100mm/2, great performer for macro and also portrait lens.

With a small budget get an inversor ring to the kit lens and you will get more then 1:1 macro images.

And how do you suggest that he will set the apperture on a DA kit zoom without apperture ring when it's been reverersed?


Sheap options:

1. Close up filter set perhaps covering +1, +2, +4. Will give you good working distance with the DA50-200 with little light loss and you have auto exposure and AF. Won't get you to 1:1, but a fair bit. Raynox adapter is sort of a extreme form of close up filter.

2. Get a sheap manual 50mm lens (with apperture ring) with something between f1.4 to f2.0 minima apperture. Doesn't even have to be K mount. Then get a sheap lens reverse ring with the right filter diameter. A 28mm or 35mm manual lens is also fine. Gives easilly 1:1 or even a bit more. As good optical quality as the reversed lens. But short DOF. Lens from 20USD to 200USD, reverse ring maybe 10-20USD.

3. An extension tube set without A contacts cost almost nothing. For a set with A contacts you will pay around 100-150USD. Make sure they have mechanical apperture transfer. Especially if you plan to use it with the DA zooms you have (no apperture rings). But it is even better to combine it with a fast 50mm manual lens. Then you can easilly get 1:1 or even a bit beyond with the combined tube set.

4. Get a bellows instead of tubes. You still need a lens to put on it. One with apperture ring. Tubes are easier to carry with you, but bellows are more versatile to work with. Once you have bellows and lens mounted you don't need to shift the number of tubes, you just adjust the bellows expansion. There are plenty of old bellows out for sale. I gave only about 20USD for the sheapest one I have.

5. Get both 2 and 3 and you can reverse a sheap manual 28, 35, or 50mm lens on top of the tubes. This will get you beyond 1:1. Depending on lens and tube distance maybe 5:1 or so. Works with the bellows also, which may bring you close to 10:1 with a 28mm reversed on fully extended tubes.

6. Get a fast 50mm as in 2 and a Vivitar/Kenko macro converter. This converter sits between camera and lens. For example a Pentax 50mm f1.7 lens will give you a 100mm f3.4 1:1 macro tele. The optical quality is quite good, if you use a good prime. This is the sheapest way to get something that resambles a dedicated macro lens. A macro converter with A contacts cost something like 100-150USD and one without A contacts (you will have to go manual and use the green button) costs something like 50-75USD. If you anyway get a 50mm lens without the A contacts (such as a the SMC Pentax-M 50/1.7) you don't need the A contacts anyway. Sheapest combo would be a non Pentax 50mm (maybe a Chinon or Ricoh K mount) that you may get for 20-30SUD, in total ~100USD for converter and 50mm lens. You can also use the converter with a tele lens to get longer reach. A 100mm f2.8 lens would give you a 200mm f5.6 1:1 macro tele. A nice thing with this macro converter is that it focus to infinity. There are also other macro converters, such as the Panagor or Sigma, which does not focus to infinity. All of them are out of production so you must look for a used one, but it is worth it. Remember that a fast 50 will also give you a good portrait lens with thin DOF on your DSLR, so you get two important lenses for this price to complement your zoom lenses.

7. Finally you can get a dedicated macro lens. If you are into flowers, something short like the DA35ltd macro or DFA50/2.8 macro are good, if you are into bugs you often want more distance such as the DFA100/2.8 macro. If you are on a budget, look for used manual focus alternatives. The various manual focus K or m42 mount 50/4 and 100/4 macro lenses does not cost that much, perhaps 150-200USD (unless they are mint collector copies in box). I can also recommend the Tamron adaptall 2 SP 90mm f2.5 1:2 macro, which you can get for 75-100USD without adaptall mount. A K mount is then very sheap, while a KA-mount (which give you automatic exposure) may cost 75-100USD used. The dedicated 2x converter gives you 1:1 macro for maybe 50-75USD (gives you a 180mm f2.5 1:1 macro). You can also combine it with a tube to get something like a 90mm f3.75 1:1 macro. All these alternatives are still sheap compared to a new macro lens.


Last edited by Douglas_of_Sweden; 10-06-2009 at 02:54 PM. Reason: complement info
10-06-2009, 03:23 PM   #9
Veteran Member
netuser's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Azores Islands, Portugal
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,241
QuoteOriginally posted by ilya80 Quote
Quick correction, there is no DFA 100mm 1:2, its1:2.8. ..........
True, I was just typing fast
10-06-2009, 07:17 PM   #10
New Member




Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: New jersey
Posts: 3
Original Poster
Hi All,

I very much appreciate all of the suggestions and responses. I will take some time and research each each of these options.Since I am inexperienced, my first inclination is to seek out a well cared for, used, dedicated macro lens. However, given all of the responses, it seems like this is a good time to learn a thing or two!

Just an fyi, my wife is a florist, and I want to be able to photograph her work, so that is why I posted my original question.

Will report back.

John
10-06-2009, 07:52 PM   #11
Pentaxian
Nick Siebers's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Madison, WI
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 2,140
As Rocnal said, I would consider a Pentax-M 50mm f/4 macro lens. These can be had for about $100 and give great images. The downsides are: manual focus, stop-down metering, and limited to filling the frame with a object twice the size of the sensor (aka 1:2 magnification). Some macro lenses will allow you to get even closer (1:1) but for flowers you will probably not need more.

As a step up, the Pentax-FA 50mm f/2.8 macro has auto-focus and communicates aperture with the camera electronically. It will do 1:1, and can probably be found for about $300. It is considered one of the sharpest lenses Pentax has ever made.
10-07-2009, 07:09 AM   #12
Inactive Account




Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Ames, Iowa, USA
Photos: Albums
Posts: 2,965
QuoteOriginally posted by jb1962 Quote
Hi All,

New to the forum, and somewhat new to photography. I have a K200D, which I like very much, and two zoom lenses (DA 18-55, and DA 50-200). Given my inexperience both of these are fine for me, but I am becoming a bit interested in a macro lens. If I could buy one, what would be a good choice? Since I am on a limted budget, I will most likely look for a used lens in top condition, but I still want to be able to get the most lens for my money.

Thanks in advance for any advice.
John
I think the Raynox DCR 150 would be a useful addition for you as a adjunct to your DA 50-200. The image quality will be excellent, and it will take little space in your kit.

As is, the DA50-200 can magnify up to 1:5 according to the specs. This puts the front of the lens about 9.5 inches away from the subject (working distance).

When you add the Raynox DCR 150 to the DA50-200, the magnification range will extend from less than 1:5 to greater than 2:1 with a working distance of about 8".

This will be a useful range for you and will take advantage of your existing lens' features for a cost of about $50USD.

Dave in Iowa

PS I have a couple good macro lenses as well as the Raynox DCR 150 so have direct experience. I'd go for the Raynox first, then a long macro lens if you discover you need more working distance or better image quality at the edges.

The Raynox image quality at the edges isn't good but that usually doesn't matter (look at some of the Raynox images posted here and you'll see that the edges aren't usually important to the image - the edges of a macro photograph will almost always be way out of focus anyway due to the small depth of field of macro photography and the 3D nature of real subjects.)

Last edited by newarts; 10-07-2009 at 04:04 PM.
10-07-2009, 07:57 AM   #13
Pentaxian
audiobomber's Avatar

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Sudbury, Ontario
Photos: Albums
Posts: 6,631
QuoteOriginally posted by jb1962 Quote
Hi All,
Just an fyi, my wife is a florist, and I want to be able to photograph her work, so that is why I posted my original question.

John
Macro is great fun, but have you tried flower photography with your present lenses? A flower head doesn't need much magnification. Either kit lens should be able to fill the frame, especially with cropping for smaller flowers.
10-07-2009, 02:59 PM   #14
Pentaxian
Marc Sabatella's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Denver, CO
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 10,686
I agree; unless you're wanting extreme closeups of the centers of inidivudal flowers, much floral photography doesn't really require great magnification. The 18-55 does 1:3 and that's often enough. But a Raynox 150 on the 50-200 gives you all the way from from there to 1;1 and beyond; this is going to be the cheapest / most effective way to get there should it become necessary.
10-08-2009, 06:39 AM   #15
Senior Member




Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Poitou Charentes
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 135
I read a thread one some forum and it talks about the following cheap setup.

- First lens mounted normally.
- Find a cheap macro coupler ring
- Reverse mount another lens in front of the first lens.

How to calculate magnification?

1st lens focal lenght / 2nd lens focal lenght.

I bought a sigma 24mm superwide for this reason, but still have to get the coupler ring..
This will give me a theoretical (I didn't tested it yet ^^ ) magnification of 8.3:1
for 20$... (in combination with the 50-200 at 200mm)

For the price, it's worth trying.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
da, k-mount, lens, macro, macro lens, pentax lens, slr lens
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Macro Lens question yoon395 Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 19 08-25-2010 06:20 AM
Macro lens question p-bags Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 16 03-31-2010 12:56 PM
IR macro lens question kasey Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 2 01-30-2010 02:38 PM
Macro lens question thosan Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 4 04-16-2008 05:10 AM
Macro Lens question BeerCan Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 11 02-07-2008 12:56 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:37 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top