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07-09-2012, 12:44 PM   #1
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Processing Kodachrome as Mono Negative

I've been sitting on an unprocessed Kodachrome 64 hoping for a miracle, but have now decided to have a crack at processing it as mono negative. There are snippets about this on the net, with loads of advice on removing the Remjet backing, but little or nothing on development times. So, does anyone have any advice? Considering this is my only shot at it, I have no opportunity to experiment.
  • Film is K64, 35mm, shot in-date, stored carefully since and exposed at rated 64 ASA
  • I have D-76, Rodinol and Perceptol devlopers
  • I will be developing in a tank and cleaning off the Remjet post-processing (subject to there being anything worth keeping)

Any hints on developing time and which developer is best would be much appreciated and I won't hold it against anyone giving me the benefit of their knowledge should it not work out.

07-14-2012, 07:11 PM   #2
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This is already exposed, right? What have you to lose? Ain't likely that anyone's goin' introduce a home-Kodachrome kit any time soon, is it?

No idea at all. I assume you searched the web and found this: Kodachrome-in-2011 . If you want to do it yourself, open the roll in a glove bag, cut off a piece about eight inches long, put the remainder into a light-proof container, and put the snippet onto a reel. Raso's commercial lab used T max; I tried to find info on D-76 versus T max, and while there's lots of info, I didn't find a direct recipe with times. Search more than I did and you might.

I'll bet that if you use a standard time and temperature for, e.g., Plus X, you'll get SOME image. Then you can refine things either in several attempts (each using a bit of your film) OR you can just use the entire roll in your second attempt. Don't forget that the Raso approach used C-14 bleach after the development/stop/fix b/w process.

Although if it were me, I'd just chuck it.
07-14-2012, 09:21 PM   #3
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You might head over to www.apug.org and search there for advice. Might even find a recipe for DIY kodachrome developer.
07-14-2012, 11:21 PM   #4
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Thanks guys,

Good idea of Ford's about cutting off a piece, but to be honest, I don't think I'd be able to extrapolate a method from the results unless it comes out fine. In which case, I'll just dive right in.

I had seen some of a thread on Apug about this, but must have missed the post suggesting 15 minutes at 20c in D76. I think I'll give that a shot. The poster didn't mention agitation, so I'll go with three tank inversions every 30 seconds as usual with D76.

If I am successful I'll post method and maybe some images.

07-18-2012, 02:30 PM   #5
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Success! Film is currently drying, but from what I can see, it looks like development was spot on. Here's the whole process:

For Kodachrome 64 35mm, shot in-date at ISO 64 and kept in fridge:

Develop for 15 minutes in D-76 stock at 20C, inverting tank three times every thirty seconds. The developer (don't even think of re-using) comes out bright green!

Stop bath as usual

Fixer as usual

Rinse in tank for five minutes

Have a large jug to hand containing one litre of water in which you have dissolved four tablespoons of Borax. In my case, I used Borax substitute and I can't imagine the real thing would have been any better.

Take the reel out of the tank and drop it into the jug of Borax

I have a flat stainless steel drainer to my sink. I carefully cleaned this and the sink beforehand, filled the sink with tepid water and poured water over the drainer.

Take the reel out of the jug of Borax after a couple of minutes soak and crack it open on the drainer. Using a soft sponge dipped regularly in the borax mixture, draw the film off the reel onto the wet drainer and rub off the Remjet, feeding the cleaned film into the sink of water. The Remjet came off really easily, so I assume the horror stories about this refer to old film.

Once this is done, rewind it on the spiral, return it to the tank and give it a 10-minute rinse.

All in all, a lot easier than I had feared. None of the Remjet came off in the developing process and there was no sign of contamination to the stop bath or fixer. The part I was most apprehensive about (apart from there being no instruction on development time) was cleaning off the Remjet and this was a doddle.

Hopefully, this will be of help to others sitting on undeveloped, or even unexposed K64. Watch this space for some scans later.
07-18-2012, 05:48 PM   #6
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Congratulations - looking forward to seeing some of those images.
07-21-2012, 07:45 AM   #7
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Interesting results once scanned; rather grainy and, well, gothic, which suits the subject matter pretty well. Here's one as it came out of the scanner.


And here are a few after some work in Lightoom, including using noise reduction to reduce the graininess a little.


They weren't that easy to scan on my Canoscan 8400F, which isn't the most sophisticared device. I had to scan them as colour negatives, then convert to greyscale to get around the magenta tint of the film.
07-23-2012, 04:08 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by mzsaunders Quote
Interesting results once scanned; rather grainy and, well, gothic, which suits the subject matter pretty well. Here's one as it came out of the scanner.


And here are a few after some work in Lightoom, including using noise reduction to reduce the graininess a little.


They weren't that easy to scan on my Canoscan 8400F, which isn't the most sophisticared device. I had to scan them as colour negatives, then convert to greyscale to get around the magenta tint of the film.
Not bad at all, good work!

Phil.

07-23-2012, 09:15 PM   #9
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Pretty nifty - where's the cemetary?
07-24-2012, 12:43 AM   #10
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Southend-on-Sea, England. I was actually surprised at what was on the film, as I had loaded it up for a holiday in Slovenia and expected to see lots of photos from that trip. There were very few, probably because I was toting around the K100D and the Super A (loaded with Pan F) as well. I had forgotten that a few months after the holiday I took the Mz5N and Super A around the cemetery to use the films up. I finished the Pan F, but not the Kodachrome, hence it still being in the camera at 31 December 2010.

I bracketed just about every shot, which turned out to be a waste of film in light of the final processing method, so there weren't many images worth keeping. I'm pretty pleased with those that were and it was fun doing it, so definitely worthwhile.

one interesting thing is that, obviously, I was selecting the film to suit the scene, so all of these were shots I wanted in colour. However, I think I actually took the third one with both cameras, so will dig the Pan F version our for comparison.
03-13-2019, 05:04 PM   #11
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kodachrome 40

Thank you for advising how to manifest and act. There is a veil, but I am satisfied with the result.
Hello from friendly Ukraine.
Vladimir.
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