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11-12-2012, 02:08 AM - 1 Like   #1
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4 x 5 Kodachromes from the 1940s - WOW!

45 Kodachromes

The quality is just brilliant.

11-13-2012, 10:12 AM   #2
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Yeah, but none with super thin DOF's, not! Beautiful pics. Someone knew what they were doing.
11-13-2012, 01:35 PM   #3
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W.O.W.
11-13-2012, 01:41 PM   #4
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Impressive.

11-13-2012, 02:05 PM   #5
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Having not lived in that era and experienced it mainly though black and white photographs and film, these photos really make the people "come to life" as real people.
11-14-2012, 05:36 AM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by pentaxian_tmb Quote
Having not lived in that era and experienced it mainly though black and white photographs and film, these photos really make the people "come to life" as real people.
100% agree. Excellent pictures. It puts the past into high def.

Thanks to the OP.
11-14-2012, 05:47 AM   #7
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that is absolutely stunning!

thanks for the link!
11-14-2012, 08:43 PM   #8
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Kodachrome was the best color film ever made. Truest colors and the most stable dyes of any color film. It is more like the old dye sublimation process. There were actually no color dyes in Kodachrome film. They were added during processing. Because of this it was possible to use dyes that were very stable and had great fade resistance.

Even today if I wanted a stable image I would prefer well processed and stabilized black and white film or Kodachrome as my film of choice. Alas it is gone. A 50 year old Kodachrome slide under normal household storage conditions loses something like 3% of it's color. E6 processing based film types usually goes magenta during that same time. To me, film is still the best recording medium. You will always be able to digitize a hard copy, but you may not be able to retrieve a file from a storage medium.

Historians of the future will not have much in the way of images or letters to go through when studying our times. Digital files simply don't stand up to the test of time. For archival purposes, the rated shelf life of an image stored on a CD/DVD is 5 years. Once your burn a file onto a CD/DVD you actually start the degradation process.

11-16-2012, 02:30 PM   #9
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Fantastic images.

I miss the Kodachrome color slides, and the dramatic results that could be had.
11-17-2012, 10:57 PM   #10
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That quality of those images in unbelievable. For some reason, the quality and colours "modernised" the shots for me. Or maybe I should say took me back in time and made me feel like they were JUST taken.

Breath taking and stunning.
11-17-2012, 11:05 PM   #11
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Stunning,

But really a lot of credit should go to the Grips and production assistants.
11-22-2012, 03:40 PM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by gaweidert Quote
Kodachrome was the best color film ever made. Truest colors and the most stable dyes of any color film. It is more like the old dye sublimation process. There were actually no color dyes in Kodachrome film. They were added during processing. Because of this it was possible to use dyes that were very stable and had great fade resistance.

Even today if I wanted a stable image I would prefer well processed and stabilized black and white film or Kodachrome as my film of choice. Alas it is gone. A 50 year old Kodachrome slide under normal household storage conditions loses something like 3% of it's color. E6 processing based film types usually goes magenta during that same time. To me, film is still the best recording medium. You will always be able to digitize a hard copy, but you may not be able to retrieve a file from a storage medium.

Historians of the future will not have much in the way of images or letters to go through when studying our times. Digital files simply don't stand up to the test of time. For archival purposes, the rated shelf life of an image stored on a CD/DVD is 5 years. Once your burn a file onto a CD/DVD you actually start the degradation process.
Kodachrome was archival. There is a void in that area at present.
11-22-2012, 09:27 PM   #13
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Just shows you that digital photography still has a ways to go to match the clarity of transparency film. Photos like this prove it. 70 years on and we've essentially gone backwards, not forwards.
11-25-2012, 03:11 AM   #14
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technology of old

The old Kodachrome may be defunct, but it was great stuff. The outright resolution of a 4 x 5 Kodachrome will likely not be matched by general purpose digital cameras EVER.Lenses will be put beyond their theoretical limits in the smaller format. There is a theoretical MAXIMUM resolution that can achieved with a 35mm size format (720 megapixels) digital sensor.This would require PERFECT lenses, which do not exist yet. A 4 x 5 Kodachrome will have about 800 megapixels of total information using 25 ASA film, best lenses at best settings. This takes in to account the lower lines per millimetre counts of large format lenses. Those old Kodachromes will NEVER be beaten by 35mm format digital.
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