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01-07-2014, 08:24 PM - 1 Like   #16
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If you want to figure out what film you need, take the K1000 for a walk without even putting film in it, set the ISO to 200 and 400 or whatever you are considering buying and see what gives you more options for where and how you shoot. You will either always have to use slower shutter speeds or wider apertures with 200 if its not bright enough out, or use higher shutter speeds or smaller apertures with 400 when it is too bright out. 400 or 200 film is just a one stop difference, but I find a lot of the time one stop is a big deal for your aperture and shutter speed options.

If you get good 400 film it will only have as much grain as most 200, and you can use it for most everything (that is what I do) but the K1000 only goes up to 1000 for shutter speed, so if you wanted to use the F2.0 end of your aperture range to get a narrow depth of field (like a picture of a flower with everything blurry behind it), you might find that 1000 shutter speed will still be over exposed on a sunny day.
I think all the K/M/A 50mm's use a 49mm filter and those are relatively cheap. So you could pick up a high quality 1 stop ND filter which is basically just sunglasses for your camera and will darken things down to make up for the extra stop going from 200 to 400. Then you just take the filter off if you need more light. If you get a really good one like B&W brand (I like Hoya HMC myself) it shouldn't really effect the quality of your pictures. I usually always use at least a yellow filter when I shoot black and white for more contrast, and that cuts down the light a tiny bit too.

Also pick up a square lens hood for your 50mm, those lenses tend to respond well to that picture quality wise and the correct Pentax lens hood is still sold new (check the board sponsor sites).


Last edited by PPPPPP42; 01-07-2014 at 08:29 PM.
01-08-2014, 11:26 AM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by .NINK. Quote
Fortunately, they do have a Nikon Coolscan V that I can use for free.
Much, much better than the V700. Have fun!


Steve
01-09-2014, 10:55 PM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by Root Quote
Like Jamey777 mentioned, developing your own film at home is pretty easy, especially when it comes to B&W. You really don't need a lot of equipment. You could probably find a tank, reel, and a changing bag used on your local craigslist for next to nothing. Places like B&H sell the necessary chemistry if you don't have a good photo supply store nearby. Once developed scan the negatives at the college. As far as development goes, I don't think you can come out much cheaper than that.

And as PPPPPP42 said, you could consider bulk rolls of film. Essentially your just loading your own film canisters. Sometimes you can find expired B&W at discount prices and the film is perfectly fine.
I saw a couple sets on craigslist, so maybe.... Otherwise I will just get them processed at the drug store.

QuoteOriginally posted by PPPPPP42 Quote
If you want to figure out what film you need, take the K1000 for a walk without even putting film in it, set the ISO to 200 and 400 or whatever you are considering buying and see what gives you more options for where and how you shoot. You will either always have to use slower shutter speeds or wider apertures with 200 if its not bright enough out, or use higher shutter speeds or smaller apertures with 400 when it is too bright out. 400 or 200 film is just a one stop difference, but I find a lot of the time one stop is a big deal for your aperture and shutter speed options.

If you get good 400 film it will only have as much grain as most 200, and you can use it for most everything (that is what I do) but the K1000 only goes up to 1000 for shutter speed, so if you wanted to use the F2.0 end of your aperture range to get a narrow depth of field (like a picture of a flower with everything blurry behind it), you might find that 1000 shutter speed will still be over exposed on a sunny day.
I think all the K/M/A 50mm's use a 49mm filter and those are relatively cheap. So you could pick up a high quality 1 stop ND filter which is basically just sunglasses for your camera and will darken things down to make up for the extra stop going from 200 to 400. Then you just take the filter off if you need more light. If you get a really good one like B&W brand (I like Hoya HMC myself) it shouldn't really effect the quality of your pictures. I usually always use at least a yellow filter when I shoot black and white for more contrast, and that cuts down the light a tiny bit too.

Also pick up a square lens hood for your 50mm, those lenses tend to respond well to that picture quality wise and the correct Pentax lens hood is still sold new (check the board sponsor sites).
My issues is that, while walking around my apartment, the light meter is always on the negative side. Yes, my place is dim, but at F2.0 and 60 shutter speed, shouldn't it be more sensitive? For example, if only the ceiling light is on in a room at night, what settings make for fair exposure? I'll have to play around with it (I have yet to try it out, damn schooling!), so uh. Thanks for the previous insight though.

QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
Much, much better than the V700. Have fun!


Steve
Yay
01-10-2014, 12:12 AM   #19
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Does it read normally outside? Indoors is pretty much ISO 400 and above territory without a flash. Outside on a normal sunny day I want to say ISO 200 film is usually like F8 1/250 or something like that for normal exposure but I forget, mighta been 1/125 for 200. There is always the sunny 16 rule to go by for testing (you can look sunny 16 up as I forget what it actually says).

Poor light is actually one of the reasons I replaced the K20D with a K-5, I was so often needing a better image quality at higher ISO. Same reason I use high quality 400 film for black and white stuff, I found 200 was rarely fast enough to do everything I wanted.

I assume if it came with an M lens instead of an A lens its one of the metal Asahi marked K1000's that you have and not a later plastic one. If it has never been serviced it might need a proper CLA to refresh the seals and recalibrate the exposure meter which would mean sending it off to Eric. Hafta try it outside again and see.

01-10-2014, 12:19 PM   #20
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Maybe its been mentioned, but since you're in college there should be a basic Photography 1 or beginning darkroom class on campus. Take it as an elective next semester. You'll learn a lot, or at least get the basics, depending on the quality of your instructor, and hopefully have fun doing it.

And trust me, you'll give up on the fresh food once you've gotten a little fixer on your hands, as you'll quickly realize which is more important!
01-10-2014, 12:29 PM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by .NINK. Quote
Okay, as the title states, I am new to film and photography and was looking to get some recommendations/opinions about film processing and scanning.[*]Process the film at someplace like Walgreens/CVS and then use an Epson V700 to scan them myself: ≈ $3
Last time I asked, Walgreen no longer return the negatives, they just send u a scanned CD. Better verify before you send in...

.... and as previous post mention, you should be able to develop the film in your school for free, if you are registered to a class...

Lee
01-11-2014, 08:50 PM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by .NINK. Quote
My issues is that, while walking around my apartment, the light meter is always on the negative side. Yes, my place is dim, but at F2.0 and 60 shutter speed, shouldn't it be more sensitive? For example, if only the ceiling light is on in a room at night, what settings make for fair exposure? I'll have to play around with it (I have yet to try it out, damn schooling!), so uh.
While there may be enough light to read, there may or may not be enough to make a photograph. What iso setting was you're camera set at? That'll effect the meter reading as much as shutter speed and aperture.

Read up on EV (exposure value) and the sunny 16 rule. The way the rule works will do a lot to help you understand proper exposure. Effectively there is a consistent relationship between shutter speed, aperture, and film sensitivity to light (iso) at any given amount of light that will create a correctly exposed image. So with a slow 100 or 200 speed film you'd still be very underexposed at 1/60 and f/2, hence the negative needle, but might be ok with a faster film (800, 1600, 3200...). The meter will read based on what you set the film speed dial to.

01-12-2014, 06:44 PM   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by LFLee Quote
Last time I asked, Walgreen no longer return the negatives, they just send u a scanned CD. Better verify before you send in...

.... and as previous post mention, you should be able to develop the film in your school for free, if you are registered to a class...

Lee
Depends on the Walgreens. Mine still has a minilab on site and returns the negs.


Steve
01-13-2014, 06:06 AM - 1 Like   #24
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Also consider that if you shoot B&W and you want your local drug store/walmart to process it, they generally do it quickly on site with their regular machinery/chemicals. But if you have non C-41 films... they either won't take it or if they do, they need to send it out to a lab just as you would and besides being an upcharge to do this (i've seen it double the cost of regular C-41) they commonly quote a 2-3 week time frame to return it to you. So if you want to shoot B&W and won't be processing it yourself, I'd stick to the C-41 films to save time and $$.
01-14-2014, 05:43 PM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by PPPPPP42 Quote
Does it read normally outside? Indoors is pretty much ISO 400 and above territory without a flash. Outside on a normal sunny day I want to say ISO 200 film is usually like F8 1/250 or something like that for normal exposure but I forget, mighta been 1/125 for 200. There is always the sunny 16 rule to go by for testing (you can look sunny 16 up as I forget what it actually says).

Poor light is actually one of the reasons I replaced the K20D with a K-5, I was so often needing a better image quality at higher ISO. Same reason I use high quality 400 film for black and white stuff, I found 200 was rarely fast enough to do everything I wanted.

I assume if it came with an M lens instead of an A lens its one of the metal Asahi marked K1000's that you have and not a later plastic one. If it has never been serviced it might need a proper CLA to refresh the seals and recalibrate the exposure meter which would mean sending it off to Eric. Hafta try it outside again and see.
I did watch some instructor's YouTube video which briefed the sunny sixteen rule, so I kind of get the idea. I just can't ever see myself taking a photo with 1/1000 unless I was staring at the sun. But then again, I have yet to actually take my camera outside :/

And yes, it is has metal pieces (Hong Kong?) with an M lens. The person I bought it off said that he/she replaced light seals and tested the light meter, so it is probably just me and my night vision eyes O_O

QuoteOriginally posted by skierd Quote
Maybe its been mentioned, but since you're in college there should be a basic Photography 1 or beginning darkroom class on campus. Take it as an elective next semester. You'll learn a lot, or at least get the basics, depending on the quality of your instructor, and hopefully have fun doing it.

And trust me, you'll give up on the fresh food once you've gotten a little fixer on your hands, as you'll quickly realize which is more important!
I want to, but it's very long and in the next city over (for the darkroom class). I'm considering it still. Otherwise, the next best option is NM Digital Photography,

QuoteOriginally posted by skierd Quote
While there may be enough light to read, there may or may not be enough to make a photograph. What iso setting was you're camera set at? That'll effect the meter reading as much as shutter speed and aperture.

Read up on EV (exposure value) and the sunny 16 rule. The way the rule works will do a lot to help you understand proper exposure. Effectively there is a consistent relationship between shutter speed, aperture, and film sensitivity to light (iso) at any given amount of light that will create a correctly exposed image. So with a slow 100 or 200 speed film you'd still be very underexposed at 1/60 and f/2, hence the negative needle, but might be ok with a faster film (800, 1600, 3200...). The meter will read based on what you set the film speed dial to.
I will try to on the weekend. Right now I'm using 400 speed film. I either need to get outside more or buy a slower speed haha. Should the ISO dial affect the light meter? I think so..?
01-14-2014, 06:16 PM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by .NINK. Quote
I did watch some instructor's YouTube video which briefed the sunny sixteen rule, so I kind of get the idea. I just can't ever see myself taking a photo with 1/1000 unless I was staring at the sun. But then again, I have yet to actually take my camera outside :/
Kodak has a daylight exposure table in their film's data sheets, for example, which is basically the Sunny 16 Rule. But bear in mind that rule is for mid-day in the summer time. You should make it the Sunny 11 Rule in the late fall through winter for latitudes that have seasons. Make a habit of looking up the data sheet for all the films you shoot if they exist. You never know what good info you may find in there sometimes.

Also, there is an old saying, expose for the shadows and develop for the highlights. I suspect you won't be doing that. But when pointing your camera into the sun, the EV value of the shadows are basically the same as if you are looking away from the sun. They are shadows, after all. So in a super high contrast scene such as looking into the sun something has to give. You're either going to capture shadows and blow the very bright sun or the opposite. So if you want to favor the shadows, the Sunny 16 rule still applies looking directly into the sun or not.
01-16-2014, 12:55 AM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by .NINK. Quote
I did watch some instructor's YouTube video which briefed the sunny sixteen rule, so I kind of get the idea. I just can't ever see myself taking a photo with 1/1000 unless I was staring at the sun. But then again, I have yet to actually take my camera outside :/
Remember that f/16 on a sunny day is just the starting point. Say you're shooting some commonly available 200 speed film, it's a bright sunny, so you're using f/16 and 1/250s to get your correct exposure on 200 speed film. Except now you want to freeze the motion of the performer/cyclist/waterfall/whatever you've decided to take a picture of... i.e. you want/need a faster shutter speed. If you drop to 1/1000s to really freeze that motion (2 stops less light, 1/250 --> 1/500 --> 1/1000), you'll have to open the aperture 2 stops more to f/8 (f/16 --> f/11 --> f/8) to maintain the correct exposure.

Or, you're a dummy like me and forgot to throw any slower film in your bag and you've found yourself on a weekend trip away from stores with nothing by 800 speed film. Or the only film that's available at your destination is 800 speed. So your sunny f/16 setting is f/16 at 1/1000 since you're using ISO800 film.


QuoteOriginally posted by .NINK. Quote
I will try to on the weekend. Right now I'm using 400 speed film. I either need to get outside more or buy a slower speed haha. Should the ISO dial affect the light meter? I think so..?

Yes, the ISO dial will affect the light meter just as much as the shutter speed and aperture. Each step up the ISO/ASA scale is one stop faster (meaning one stop more sensitive to light). Remember, the sunny 16 relationship: On a bright sunny (summer) day, your film speed is your shutter speed at f/16. So ISO 50 film like Fuji Velvia, the correct shutter speed at f/16 would be 1/50 or 1/60 depending on your camera. With ISO 100 film, you're one stop more sensitive to light, so you shorten the shutter speed by one stop to 1/100 or 1/125. Same with ISO 200 (shutter speed 1/250), and so on.
02-01-2014, 06:41 PM   #28
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Congrats NINK for exploring the use of film. It's just like vinyl records - never go out of fashion! I use a Pentax MX with the Pentax 1.4 50mm prime lens and it's a delight to use. My film is Ilford FP4 which I develop at home and shortly will be using my own darkroom which has equipt I've had for over 50 years! I also have an Epson GT7000 scanner with a separate light box for trannies. For developer I use Kodak HC110 which is a brilliant universal brew once you are used to it. To me B & W photography is the purest form of the art and has endless possibilities for mood and texture. So good luck with your new venture - you wont regret it.

Last edited by RamonT; 02-01-2014 at 06:57 PM. Reason: adjust line format
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