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04-01-2014, 08:48 AM   #1
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Do You Freeze Your Film? Refridgerate?

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I've gotten back into 135 format heavily in the past few months after more than a decade away and I've found it's infinitely more zen and soothing and exciting to me for a myriad of reasons. One caveat though is I've found that, for obvious reasons, the film market itself has narrowed considerably and far fewer options exist than once did. Though, to be certain there are still some remarkable films available, some that rival the best of the past and in terms of latitude probably best them. All that aside though...

I picked up at auction a bunch of rolls of good old Fuji Reala 100 which I used to use occasionally. This stuff though, so hard to find in general now that it's been discontinued by Fujifilm, is long expired... May 2002 in this particular case. I bought it any how because such a slow film should deteriorate much, much less rapidly than faster versions, and also because the seller assured that it had been kept refrigerated its entire life (as well as numerous good feedback from other buyers of his older film sales). So my question:

I intend to savor these rolls slowly over time, but freezing is not something I ever did in the past simply because I never bought enough at a given time to worry about it, and never used expired film except for my own and it was never more than a year past. Any caveats or issues I should know about with freezing film. Just looking for some experience here. Cheers.

04-01-2014, 09:09 AM   #2
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Put the boxes of film into either a plastic bag or plastic tub before putting into the freezer. When defrosting the film leave it in its original packaging for a couple of hours prior to opening and using. I have shot film that had been in either a freezer or fridge for decades and it was still good.
04-01-2014, 09:22 AM   #3
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This link to Kodak's guide to Storage and Care of Photographic Materials may be worth reading. Kodak gives a table of warm-up times for various freezer temperatures for film formats/sizes as well as other info about film. It's a good read.
04-01-2014, 09:31 AM - 1 Like   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
This link to Kodak's guide to Storage and Care of Photographic Materials may be worth reading. Kodak gives a table of warm-up times for various freezer temperatures for film formats/sizes as well as other info about film. It's a good read.
Yes. Make that into a fridge magnet.

04-01-2014, 11:26 AM   #5
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I keep the bulk of it in the freezer and keep some in the refrigerator for when I need it quickly.
04-01-2014, 11:31 AM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by AquaDome Quote
Yes. Make that into a fridge magnet.
Now that's a good idea.

---------- Post added 04-01-14 at 11:32 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by GateCityRadio Quote
I keep the bulk of it in the freezer and keep some in the refrigerator for when I need it quickly.
That's exactly what I've done. I'm loading a roll today - will be nice to get out and shoot this stuff, but I'll need to make it last.
04-01-2014, 01:14 PM   #7
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It's a good idea to let your frozen film warm up room temperature over a couple of days.
But sometimes my demanding shooting schedule doesn't allow me the luxury of time.

When I'm in a hurry I'll thaw my frozen film in a pan of warm water.
For best results I place it inside a ziploc bag first.

In a pinch I've been known to microwave a roll or two.
It's quite a sight, all those sparks from the metal cassette.
Now I remove it from the box, which I found is quite flammable.

Chris

04-01-2014, 01:39 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by ChrisPlatt Quote
...
In a pinch I've been known to microwave a roll or two.
It's quite a sight, all those sparks from the metal cassette.

Chris
Crazy, man. Perhaps just hold the film in your hand. It will transfer heat pretty fast. Defrosting a canister of 135-36 for 48 hours is about 46 hours more than you need too.
04-01-2014, 02:29 PM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by chickentender Quote
a bunch of rolls of good old Fuji Reala 100
congrats! just curious, how much per roll did you pay? I haven't had a successful auction attempt on expired film yet... It always goes for more than I am willing to spend...
04-01-2014, 04:12 PM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by todd Quote
congrats! just curious, how much per roll did you pay? I haven't had a successful auction attempt on expired film yet... It always goes for more than I am willing to spend...
10 rolls for $50 from Bulgaria. No exactly a deal, but it's only gonna go up. He's got a few more: 5X Fujicolor Superia Reala Color Negative Film ISO 100 36 Exp 5 Rolls | eBay

Last edited by Eyewanders; 04-01-2014 at 05:39 PM.
04-02-2014, 09:15 PM   #11
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Long term film storage in the freezer, short term in the fridge.

I take shooting film from fridge and let it warm up for 1 hour. When the short term film supply is running low, I move some from the freezer to the fridge.

I never use film directly from the freezer, only the fridge.

Phil.
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