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09-23-2014, 06:59 AM   #1
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135 film

Hello everyone!

Being a photographer for the last 8 years, I have been on many different platforms of cameras, but more recently I have been lazy and disinterested to put it the best way possible.

To fix this, I want to go back to my roots and go back to shooting film for awhile, one problems are, it's costly, and takes a lot of time, now mind you I do have all of the equipment/chemicals for photo processing, however I have no where to do it anymore. I'm curious to know if anyone knows of a cheap way of processing film without a darkroom, right now I am wanting to shoot B&W for the most part if that helps, and I use to be a big Kodak film guy, but I am thinking of trying Ilorford film, anyone have any opinions which they like better and why? I don't care about which series at this point, just whatever you use that is B&W.


Also I would like to know what the difference is between standard negative film and B&W Chromogenic (C-41), I know it has something to do with the process method, but if anyone has any information that, that'd be swell.



Thanks guys!

P.S I plan to be using my Pentax Pz-1p for this.

09-23-2014, 07:50 AM   #2
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QuoteOriginally posted by Bcrary3 Quote
I'm curious to know if anyone knows of a cheap way of processing film without a darkroom
Use a changing bag or other dark space to load your processing tank. I load my tanks in the small room where the clothes washer and dryer are located. I then do the actual processing at the kitchen sink.

As for the difference between traditional and chromogenic (C-41), part of the key is in your question. Chromogenic films are processed using the same chemicals as C-41 color negative films. Dye clouds replace the silver grains to create the image.

I will leave the matter of film choice/preference up to other users, though I will note that loading your own 35mm canisters from bulk rolls is very inexpensive for films that are available in that form.


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09-23-2014, 07:52 AM   #3
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Processing film without a darkroom is "easy." All you need is a darkened room to load the film in a daylight processing tank, like a Patterson, and the developer and fixer. For the darkened room: try a bathroom, with a lockable door. If there's no window, so much the better. Do it at night. Warn others in the house NOT TO OPEN THE DOOR, or TURN ON THE LIGHTS IN THE HALL! A folded towel will block light from under the door. If after a timed ONE MINUTE you can't see anything, all is good. My experience has been that a few tiny points of light don't seem to matter; just keep your body between them and the light. A closet if big enough is also good, they rarely have windows!

You can also use a changing bag; my preference is the bathroom method.

There are several threads on loading the tank. Practice with "scrap" film in the light loading the tank, first with your eyes open, then closed, then in the dark. Do this before the real thing.

Plastic reels like the Patterson are probably easier for the novice, but you probably know about this since you say you have the equipment already. I'd suggest you sit on the floor with your back to the door. Put the tank, film cassette, etc, in a pan of some sort so that little things, like the FILM, don't get away from you. A print processing tray, 11 x 14, is fine. Amazing how big a bathroom floor is in total darkness! Tip: if you plan to develop the film at a later time, LABEL the loaded tank! Trust me, and don't ask why I stress this.

Ilford, Kodak, Kentmere are all good films. Try freestylephoto.biz for a broad source. Reliable, too. C-41 BW films process like negative color. I'd suggest you get your chops back on "traditional" BW film before tackling color negative processes.

The kitchen is a good place to process the film in the loaded tank, having a water supply, a sink, and water resistant counters. I dry film in the bathroom suspended by a wood spring clothespin over the tub, weighted by a clothes pin on the end.

The actual processing is described in many places. If you've done it in the past you'll remember.

Have fun!
09-23-2014, 08:00 AM   #4
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I have seen some daylight loading tanks for 120 roll film, that were really neat, you would but the canister in the tank, attach the lead to a little wheel, close the tank, turn the lever until the film was unloaded from the canister, then the canister removed, and processed that way, it would automatically load the film into the reel. I haven't been able to find anything like that for 135 film, I have all the stuff to do it, however, it isn't exactly... Portable, steel reels, rollers, etc. Mostly I am looking for like a daylight processing tank for 135 film, if something like that exists.


I will have to go through what chemicals I have, but it was previously used for colour negatives/prints. Is the developer and fixer specific to film type, i.e B&W or colour, or can they be used interchangeably?

09-23-2014, 10:24 AM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by Bcrary3 Quote
I have seen some daylight loading tanks for 120 roll film, that were really neat, you would but the canister in the tank, attach the lead to a little wheel, close the tank, turn the lever until the film was unloaded from the canister, then the canister removed, and processed that way, it would automatically load the film into the reel. I haven't been able to find anything like that for 135 film, I have all the stuff to do it, however, it isn't exactly... Portable, steel reels, rollers, etc. Mostly I am looking for like a daylight processing tank for 135 film, if something like that exists.


I will have to go through what chemicals I have, but it was previously used for colour negatives/prints. Is the developer and fixer specific to film type, i.e B&W or colour, or can they be used interchangeably?
I've never heard of a daylight LOADING tank for 120 film, at least for amateur use. For 135mm yes, IIRC they were quite expensive. Someone even built a fiendish device to develop film WITHIN the cassette, as I recall they weren't very popular, probably for good reasons. The Patterson and Nikor tanks are all daylight processing, but not daylight loading. Gotta have a darkened room or changing bag for them.

If your chemicals are used C-41 stuff, dump them. Their shelf life is limited and they can't be used for BW. Get a general purpose developer, such as D-76. You might hit a second-hand bookstore and look for Ansel Adams' The Negative, or David Vestal's The Craft of Photography, just to name two fine books on BW film work. And yes, the chemicals are specific to the film type, within the broad two classes of chromogenic C 41 BW and the traditional film.
09-23-2014, 11:11 AM   #6
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Here is a video of one of the ones I found:


And as far as my chemicals go, they are un-opened stuff, I don't know how old though.
09-23-2014, 11:47 AM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by Bcrary3 Quote
Here is a video of one of the ones I found:
Interesting device.

You're going to need all new development times than recommended by the developer for your film(s) if you are continuously agitating it. And I'd be fearful of laminar flow along the boundary layer with the developer I use when you pull your film through a still bath of developer like that. I'd hook up that knob he is rotating to a motor to do that for me. And only one roll at a time.

Last edited by tuco; 09-23-2014 at 12:00 PM.
09-23-2014, 11:47 AM   #8
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By no means complete but it's a start:



This:
Amazon.com : Adorama Small Changing Bag, 16x17", for Bulk Loading Film. : Camera Cases : Camera & Photo



And this:
Amazon.com : Paterson Universal tank and 2 reels-#115 : Film Processing Supplies : Camera & Photo



One of these:
Amazon.com : Paterson 12" Color Thermometer : Test Tube Thermometer : Camera & Photo



A couple of these:
PYREX Berzelius Tall Form 600mL Beaker Graduated Ea: Science Lab Reusable Beakers: Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific



A set of these:
SEOH 5 Pack Graduated Cylinder 2 part w/ bumper 10ml 25ml 50ml 100ml & 250ml: Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific



And a few of these (in different sizes). Freestyle is a better source but here's the Amazon link for consistency:
Amazon.com : Delta 1 Datatainer Storage Bottle ~ 1 Gallon : Camera Cleaning Kits : Camera & Photo



Last edited by MD Optofonik; 09-23-2014 at 12:10 PM.
09-23-2014, 12:33 PM   #9
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I will have to look at the chemicals I have and see what is what. Haha
I have a tank, a spool for the film, a canister to put it in, and the roller motor, but I need a dark area to try it out, and to see if my developer and stop bath are still good. Haha, I will check on that stuff this evening.
09-23-2014, 01:47 PM   #10
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Okay, so here are all of the chemicals I have, well not all, I have some big 2 litre jugs of stuff in the basement, not sure what they are, but I have the following:

Kodak Ektacolor RA Developer Replenisher RT (Part A, B, and C) and it says 'paper'
and some Kodak Indicator stop bath for film and paper.


In the basement I have two big jugs of Bleach Fix-Replenisher part A and B (also says paper)
09-23-2014, 01:54 PM   #11
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This will be a good place find the info you need for your first time out.
09-23-2014, 02:01 PM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by Bcrary3 Quote
Okay, so here are all of the chemicals I have, well not all, I have some big 2 litre jugs of stuff in the basement, not sure what they are, but I have the following:

Kodak Ektacolor RA Developer Replenisher RT (Part A, B, and C) and it says 'paper'
and some Kodak Indicator stop bath for film and paper.


In the basement I have two big jugs of Bleach Fix-Replenisher part A and B (also says paper)
Some color chemicals in bulk, it sounds like. You can get convenient, one-liter color kits to mix up ( eg Jobo C-41 Press Kit or similar). Mixing color in one-liter batches for home use is often more economical for small volume. They can process around 15 rolls of film if use within around 3 months. Large containers with air gaps in the bottles oxidize it faster and shortens shelf life.
09-23-2014, 02:07 PM   #13
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All the sizes I have are to make 10 litres. With the developer replenisher, can this be used on the film or..?

---------- Post added 09-23-14 at 04:48 PM ----------

I think I am going to mix up some of these developers and attempt to process a roll with them and see what happens.
09-23-2014, 04:32 PM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by Bcrary3 Quote
and some Kodak Indicator stop bath for film and paper.
This is the only thing from your basement that is likely to work as advertised. Photographic chemicals (even fixer) do not last forever.


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09-23-2014, 07:38 PM   #15
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Well, it appears as if the other chemicals do nothing beyond make a big mess. I do not advise using old chemicals. Haha
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