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04-06-2015, 04:49 AM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by agusbmxarg Quote
Thanks Steve and Tuco for the input.

What I was thinking about the orange filter I posted (already bought it, they are really rare here and I can't buy off ebay/amazon) is that I could use it to correct this 500T film I have when shooting daylight, right?

Maybe not completely correct but it would look better I think
No if you want to shift colour you need the correct CC numbered filter for the film and the daylight on the day.
The mono filters are different.

09-14-2016, 09:51 AM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by ChrisPlatt Quote
A yellow green filter will darken skies and foliage and benefit skin tones.
IMO it's the best general purpose filter for BW photography.

Chris
I have just acquired a Minolta Hi-matic AF2 Point and Shoot camera, from a thrift store. The cost was a fortune, at $7.

I really like it. It's solid, easy to use, uses AA batteries and in summary, is charming.
It has a 46mm filter thread. I never use filters on my Pentax SLR but for the Minolta I thought a Y2 yellow filter might be useful, for use with black and white film.
I note your stated preference for a yellow-geen filter. Would Y2 also be a good first choice for a filter?
Would you advise me to buy a Step-Up filter adapter, to allow me to use 49mm filters on both the Pentax and the Minolta?

Thanks in advance for any guidance!
09-14-2016, 11:34 AM   #18
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There are any number of useful filters based on what you like to do. But I think it is important to realize that any filter puts another piece of glass between your subject and your film (or sensor.) It is another piece of glass that will have an effect on your exposure, can cause flare, that will get dirty, and may introduce distortion into your photograph that isn't there with your lens. Unlike many, I do not recommend just strolling around with a filter on the lens unless there is a specific need.

For myself the filter I use most frequently is a Skylight 1A I have several of these in different sizes. I like these because they cut through the UV and add a bit of warmth. Since I live and photograph above 5,000 feet, there is more UV than people at lower elevations have to concern themselves with.

Just behind the Skylight for me is the polarizing filter. I consider this to be the most useful filter you can buy, and it is worth buying a good one. I use the polarizing filter for both color and black and white. They intensify the colors and the contrast because they eliminate unpolarized glare, which reduces the contrast and color saturation that your film or sensor can record. With a good one of these you probably don't need the yellow filter at all.

I do occasionally use a light yellow, K2, filter, usually in combo with a polarizer. I do this to slightly intensify the sky usually but it also improves tonal values in the midtones.

I do keep a light green or yellow green filter handy for portraits because I like the look it gives the skin tone, but I do not use those if I am using artificial light. I also use the polarizing filter for this as well.

Though I am not a great fan of the technique, there are people who like blurring running water, etc. For them the neutral density filter is useful. I do use a 0.9 ND filter occasionally, but not very often. The reason I will use this filter is when I am using 400 or higher ISO film and I want to open up the aperture on my lens further.

If you are considering using filters in your own photography than I suggest you find a good book on filters and their uses. You may find some that fit your way of working that I, or others, don't use.
09-14-2016, 12:54 PM   #19
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Many thanks for your valued comments. Food for thought indeed!
I am going to postpone any filter purchases until I see the monochrome results I get "unfiltered".

By the way, I am not a novice in photography but am on a voyage of rediscovery. I processed all my own films fifty years ago, and printed them, too.

Thanks again. I value your comments.

07-22-2018, 09:59 PM   #20
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When burning B/W film, I rarely shoot without a deep yellow (#16) or an orange filter.
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07-22-2018, 10:06 PM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by agusbmxarg Quote
Thanks for the feedback people.

I want about the Hoya 'G' Orange filter, it doesn't look '100% orange' if you know what I mean. Link to Hoya site



According to the graph, the G orange filter is half way between the yellow filter and red filter, so I guess no matter if 'G' or 'X2', the orange G should still be different from my Y2 yellow, right?

The Hoya G filter is a great, all around filter. Its a deep yellow filter.

Russ
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08-30-2018, 07:16 AM   #22
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I’m a big fan of a deep yellow filter, as opposed to the orange or the light yellow for my standard contrast lens.
08-30-2018, 10:24 AM   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by kiron Kid Quote
When burning B/W film, I rarely shoot without a deep yellow (#16) or an orange filter.
I am pretty much the same. Most B&W films benefit from a yellow filter and films that tend towards higher blue sensitivity (e.g. Acros 100's so-called orthopanchromatic spectral response) may even respond well to orange. I use a #12 Deep Yellow (aka "minus blue") when I want to specifically darken skies and blue waters. The "minus blue" has a steep transition with 90% at 550nm and longer, 50% at 525nm and zero at 500nm and shorter. It is very cool for landscape work.


Steve

11-14-2018, 02:33 PM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by agusbmxarg Quote
Thanks Steve and Tuco for the input.

What I was thinking about the orange filter I posted (already bought it, they are really rare here and I can't buy off ebay/amazon) is that I could use it to correct this 500T film I have when shooting daylight, right?

Maybe not completely correct but it would look better I think
There is a pukka filter to balance a T colour film to daylight!
Do You Use an 85 or 85B Filter for Shooting Daylight on Tungsten Film? - Lenses and Lens Accessories - Cinematography.com
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