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05-30-2017, 11:25 AM   #46
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QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
Man, when I tape Retro 80S down by the perimeter even with tension its is not flat. There still some warp on that extra curly film. And to various degrees with other films too for me. 120 film, especially 6x9+, is hard sometimes. It needs a drum or simulated drum to scan the film on a curve. Small format is easier to flat scan due to its small size to thickness of the base and sheet film is easier due its much thicker base too.
I have not used the film you quote in fact the last B&W MF would have been Tri-X.

Films stored in negative bags always seemed to lay flat at least over time and could sometimes be coaxed into flatness left between pages of a hefty book (still in their sleeves) for a few days. I am sure heat and humidity have there influence and my suggestion may or may not work, but worth a go IMO.

All these techniques mentioned may be for some images 'good enough' and it may be considered to have professional scans for those 'Hero' images?

One method not mentioned was wet scanning or wet copying, the latter using the scanning liquid to adhere the film to the backlit plate before copying. For scanning a wet holder required of course. One advantage is the potential minimising of grain
http://theonlinephotographer.typepad.com/the_online_photographer/2010/10/per...e-part-ii.html


Last edited by TonyW; 05-30-2017 at 11:31 AM.
05-30-2017, 11:43 AM   #47
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QuoteOriginally posted by TonyW Quote
Films stored in negative bags always seemed to lay flat at least over time and could sometimes be coaxed into flatness left between pages of a hefty book (still in their sleeves) for a few days. I am sure heat and humidity have there influence and my suggestion may or may not work, but worth a go IMO.
...
Yeah, over time a lot of 120 will flatten out stored in archiving sleeves. But that is a catch 22 as well. The best time to scan your BW film in terms of dust is right after they are done drying. Mostly any dust is fresh, big dust that blows of easily and with little to no picking over the image with a content-aware healing tool in post if you want a cleaner image.

My negatives are stored in archiving sleeves in three-ring binders on a shelf. And the older the negative the more micro fine dust that is all over it. Often I'm better off re-washing the negatives before scanning which is no fun. You really need to seal off to prevent dust from getting on them I guess.

I've tried wet-scanning on my older flat bed. That helps a lot for the micro fine dust. But my current 120 film scanner's negative carrier needs a big mod to do any wet scanning on.
05-30-2017, 10:39 PM   #48
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The FIND Lab does excellent work and I really can't recommend them enough. Keep in mind the prices you've quoted include developing and shipping the film (and prints if you get them made) back to you. If you develop yourself and send to them for scanning, I believe you'll pay $2-12 per frame for scanning. It is absolutely worth paying the little bit extra for them to correct your scans with their Basic+ service.

I just had a 35mm frame of Fuji Superia 800 printed on metal to 20"x30" for a client. I believe I had a "Fat Boy" (5400x3600, approx. 19.5 megapixels) scan done and it looks excellent at least to my eye. I would have little hesitation getting 30x40 prints made from their Ultra scans.

Printing large is not a inexpensive endeavor, in time, effort, or money. The decisions start when you assemble and load your camera. Is your lens in good shape? Did you pick a finer grained slow film? Is the film plate in your camera in good condition? Did you shoot with the mirror locked up on a tripod; was there enough light to allow a fast enough shutter speed to avoid mirror slap? Did you or your lab develop your film properly? Did you keep it clean? When it comes time to scan, did you keep the film flat? Is the sensor on the flatbed adjusted correctly? If using a DSLR, did you get a good macro lens, a proper copy stand, have a good light source? Then when it's finally time to print, on what? Paper, wood, metal, canvas? For what purpose? Art galleries, posters, hanging on the wall above the couch?

I find I get excellent quality from my K-30's 16mp sensor at 11x17 and good enough at 20x30 at 100 to 400 ISO. I think I'll get the quality I want to print 30x40 from the 24mp AA-free sensor in the KP, especially if I'm able to use pixel shift, for images from the field. I think if you were to use a pentax with pixel shift for your scanning, you'll have more than enough file to work with.



QuoteOriginally posted by Femto1969 Quote
Hi, Team,

I recently got into medium format film with the intention of being able to produce very large prints (like 30x40in images) that are beautifully sharp. I want to take portraits and landscapes, primarily. Of course I chose a Pentax 67 to help me accomplish that goal.

Provided everything with the exposure is spot on, what quality of a scan will I need to produce prints that large?

Before I researched the topic, I presumed that I could buy a scanner for a few hundred dollars to help me get the image quality I need out of my 120 film. I now think I was dead wrong. It looks like I will need to spend over $1000 to buy a scanner with that type or resolution.

I have a Canon 70D and a Canon Pixma Pro 100 that produces fantastic images together around 13x19 in. The whole reason I bought my Pentax system was to outclass the image quality I can already achieve dramatically.

So it looks like I may buy an Epson Photo model for every-day work, and end up scanning and printing my very large prints at a service. Please correct me if I am missing some fantastic budget option.

The Find Lab, for example, can scan 120 film in various resolutions. Anywhere from 3100x2475 px for $10 to 5994x4800 px for $17. These prices are for basic scans with no in-lab processing.

Pricing ยป thefindlab.com

What level resolution will I need to create very large prints? Does anyone have any suggestions for achieving these results inexpensively? Am I crazy? Should I sell all my gear and just go back to digital photography? :P

Thanks for your thoughts!
05-31-2017, 06:51 AM   #49
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QuoteOriginally posted by skierd Quote
The FIND Lab does excellent work and I really can't recommend them enough. Keep in mind the prices you've quoted include developing and shipping the film (and prints if you get them made) back to you. If you develop yourself and send to them for scanning, I believe you'll pay $2-12 per frame for scanning. It is absolutely worth paying the little bit extra for them to correct your scans with their Basic+ service.

I just had a 35mm frame of Fuji Superia 800 printed on metal to 20"x30" for a client. I believe I had a "Fat Boy" (5400x3600, approx. 19.5 megapixels) scan done and it looks excellent at least to my eye. I would have little hesitation getting 30x40 prints made from their Ultra scans.

Printing large is not a inexpensive endeavor, in time, effort, or money. The decisions start when you assemble and load your camera. Is your lens in good shape? Did you pick a finer grained slow film? Is the film plate in your camera in good condition? Did you shoot with the mirror locked up on a tripod; was there enough light to allow a fast enough shutter speed to avoid mirror slap? Did you or your lab develop your film properly? Did you keep it clean? When it comes time to scan, did you keep the film flat? Is the sensor on the flatbed adjusted correctly? If using a DSLR, did you get a good macro lens, a proper copy stand, have a good light source? Then when it's finally time to print, on what? Paper, wood, metal, canvas? For what purpose? Art galleries, posters, hanging on the wall above the couch?

I find I get excellent quality from my K-30's 16mp sensor at 11x17 and good enough at 20x30 at 100 to 400 ISO. I think I'll get the quality I want to print 30x40 from the 24mp AA-free sensor in the KP, especially if I'm able to use pixel shift, for images from the field. I think if you were to use a pentax with pixel shift for your scanning, you'll have more than enough file to work with.
Thanks for the advice - you are really right about the entire process being quite meticulous. I think the best strategy for me is to do my best and hope for decent results - especially since I am just starting off with film. Chances are it will take me years to make anything remotely close to that of Michael Kenna's work, who is my main inspiration. Its probably just a dream. But a dream worth working towards! (I should note that even though Kenna could make enormous prints with his negatives, his prints are rather minuscule by comparison.)

05-31-2017, 08:42 AM - 1 Like   #50
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The first time you open a massive print when it comes back from the printer is like a little Christmas, especially when it comes out better than you expected. Makes it all worth it for sure!

In the end too printing, especially high quality large scale prints, is another one of the deepest rabbit holes of the photography. How far you chase the dragon is a limited only by your determination and your wallet.

If you have a local university with photography classes, see if they offer a darkroom printing course and a digital darkroom course. Optical printing is rewarding in of itself, and the digital class should get you a lot of info on the modern process
05-31-2017, 09:57 AM - 1 Like   #51
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Luminous landscape has a good article on the 67ii.

Pentax67ii - Luminous Landscape

LuLa is well worth the $12 a year for your interests.
05-31-2017, 10:31 AM - 1 Like   #52
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QuoteOriginally posted by skierd Quote
Optical printing is rewarding in of itself
Although my 6x7 enlarger is under shrouds in an upstairs closet, I strong second this statement. I will even go as far as to suggest that for B&W, an optical enlargement may be preferable up to the limits of available paper sizes to a digital inkjet print. Blue Moon in Portland offers custom B&W enlargements up to 16"x20":

Darkroom Printing | Blue Moon Camera and Machine


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05-31-2017, 02:26 PM   #53
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
Although my 6x7 enlarger is under shrouds in an upstairs closet, I strong second this statement. I will even go as far as to suggest that for B&W, an optical enlargement may be preferable up to the limits of available paper sizes to a digital inkjet print. Blue Moon in Portland offers custom B&W enlargements up to 16"x20":

Darkroom Printing | Blue Moon Camera and Machine


Steve
Folks! I do not need to go that far down the rabbit hole... yet!!

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