Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
02-18-2018, 11:33 PM   #1
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
murrelet's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Portland, OR, USA
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 303
What's wrong with my color scans?

I've been getting my C-41 film developed and scanned by a local lab. I've been happy with their scans. 6-ish MP scans cost $7.50 a roll (35mm or 120). With processing, that amounts to $11.25 per roll. I recently acquired an Epson V550 scanner, mainly because I had been unhappy with the BW scans from the lab. It's been brilliant being able to develop BW on my own and get very high resolution scans that look great. I was hoping to have the lab develop my C-41 rolls and scan at home. But this is what I've been getting, lab scan from their Noritsu S-2 on left, my scan on right:



Colors look terrible! I'm wondering how much of the difference is due to
  1. Scanner software color settings (EPSON Scan 3.9.2.2US software)
  2. Software itself (should I look into SilverFast?)
  3. Need to calibrate the scanner (I bought the scanner used; previous owner claimed to hardly use it and was almost new)
  4. Scanner itself


02-19-2018, 01:03 AM   #2
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
twilhelm's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Florida
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,583
I’ve heard the Epson software is limited and you can have color issues, I’ve never used it, but several reviews have mentioned it. I do have extensive experience with Silverfast, which may have a bit of a learning curve, but gives you extensive control of color profiles. Vuescan is another program which I’ve used a little. It appeared to have a good user interface, but there are others here that can comment further on that.
02-19-2018, 03:08 AM   #3
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
IgorZ's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 1,275
I'll second that. I haven't had colour issues with Silverfast. I have had colour issues with my flatbed Canon and Canon software. I can't remember what I did, but basically I had to play around with the settings to get rid of it. I had a greenish cast as well.
02-19-2018, 04:29 AM   #4
Senior Member
antipattern's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Lancaster, United Kingdom
Photos: Albums
Posts: 193
The Epson software's results depend a lot on the settings. If I remember correctly, there were settings for brightness/exposure and colour correction. Depending on the film, you might get different colour accuracy. It might be worth playing with the settings first.

02-19-2018, 09:39 AM   #5
Pentaxian




Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Seattle
Posts: 7,539
You'll have color balance problems scanning negative color film in general. Scanning software usually comes with some color film profiles. If you have a profile that is a good start. If not, let's hope another one works well enough or you have some white, grey or black in your scene to help you manually balance it.

In your scan, you have a white area. Look at the RGB values there. I see an excess green and red. Pull the green and red channels down a little or use your white balance color picker on that area and see what happens.

Last edited by tuco; 02-19-2018 at 09:45 AM.
02-19-2018, 10:30 AM   #6
Pentaxian




Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 320
My experience of Epson scan software is that it is more than capable of producing fine results with any medium and although not as many options as Silverfast or Vuescan.

IMO the results you are getting are due only to the pre and post scan settings being less than optimal and with a little work you should get quite acceptable results without swapping your scan software.

Happy to look further so if you want to post the same image as a straight scan i.e. as a negative will see what is needed to correct
02-19-2018, 10:31 AM   #7
Pentaxian
Swift1's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Oregon
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 4,246
Like Tuco said, scanning color negative film is problematic. The auto exposure/color correction in Epson Scan isn't that great and doesn't have film type profiles.
That being said, Epson Scan is actually very good, and allows for more user control than any software I've tried.
Here is the method I use. It's more work, but with a bit of practice you should get much better colors, and I find this method gives the truest interpretation of each particular color film stock.
Getting the most from color negative film with your Epson flatbed. – Photography by Colton Allen
02-19-2018, 04:56 PM   #8
Pentaxian




Join Date: May 2011
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Photos: Albums
Posts: 2,257
QuoteOriginally posted by murrelet Quote
Colors look terrible! I'm wondering how much of the difference is due to
Actually the difference is not much that perhaps a slight adjustment in exposure - notice the burned out sky, and maybe a little contrast and they would be very similar - if not the same.

If you want to see an example of wide difference in color, here is one I have from a minilab Noritsu and my own Coolscan of the same frame of Kodak Gold 100.



You may have noticed I didn't say one or the other as terrible simply because there are no standards in scanning color negatives leaving us to be the judge of it.

02-19-2018, 05:56 PM   #9
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
murrelet's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Portland, OR, USA
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 303
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by Swift1 Quote
Like Tuco said, scanning color negative film is problematic. The auto exposure/color correction in Epson Scan isn't that great and doesn't have film type profiles.
That being said, Epson Scan is actually very good, and allows for more user control than any software I've tried.
Here is the method I use. It's more work, but with a bit of practice you should get much better colors, and I find this method gives the truest interpretation of each particular color film stock.
Getting the most from color negative film with your Epson flatbed. – Photography by Colton Allen
Thanks, everyone for all the good info. The consensus seems to be that I could do more fiddling with the scanner software settings. Unfortunately, that might mean more time spent in front of the computer than I'm willing to spend (which is a lot of the appeal of analog photography for myself). I'm probably going to set aside this learning for later and continue with the lab scans for now.
02-19-2018, 07:14 PM   #10
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Texas
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,222
QuoteOriginally posted by murrelet Quote
?.. Unfortunately, that might mean more time spent in front of the computer than I'm willing to spend (which is a lot of the appeal of analog photography for myself). I'm probably going to set aside this learning for later and continue with the lab scans for now.
That's why I stick with processing and scanning B&W, and send out color film.
02-20-2018, 07:53 AM   #11
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
IgorZ's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 1,275
QuoteOriginally posted by murrelet Quote
Thanks, everyone for all the good info. The consensus seems to be that I could do more fiddling with the scanner software settings. Unfortunately, that might mean more time spent in front of the computer than I'm willing to spend (which is a lot of the appeal of analog photography for myself). I'm probably going to set aside this learning for later and continue with the lab scans for now.
it might be worth trying Silverfast. I think you can download a trial version.
02-24-2018, 11:40 AM   #12
Pentaxian




Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Seattle
Posts: 7,539
QuoteOriginally posted by murrelet Quote
Thanks, everyone for all the good info. The consensus seems to be that I could do more fiddling with the scanner software settings. Unfortunately, that might mean more time spent in front of the computer than I'm willing to spend (which is a lot of the appeal of analog photography for myself). I'm probably going to set aside this learning for later and continue with the lab scans for now.
Yeah, that's why negative color at home can be no fun. Kodak has said they want to stay in the film business I hear. Why in the hell don't they make an affordable, high quality scanner with excellent software that has modern color film profiles to get through that orange mask and balance well automagically? They'd get more people shooting film and thereby sell more film. You practically have to be a color expert to scan color negative film, it seems.
02-24-2018, 01:30 PM   #13
Pentaxian




Join Date: May 2011
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Photos: Albums
Posts: 2,257
QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
Kodak has said they want to stay in the film business I hear. Why in the hell don't they make an affordable, high quality scanner with excellent software that has modern color film profiles to get through that orange mask and balance well automagically?
I believe they did - Kodak Pakon. Long since discontinued but I see some posts showing the results which look pretty good. Now with recent re-releases of films would they release a new scanner?
02-26-2018, 09:36 AM   #14
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
timw4mail's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Lansing, MI
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,339
QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
Yeah, that's why negative color at home can be no fun. Kodak has said they want to stay in the film business I hear. Why in the hell don't they make an affordable, high quality scanner with excellent software that has modern color film profiles to get through that orange mask and balance well automagically? They'd get more people shooting film and thereby sell more film. You practically have to be a color expert to scan color negative film, it seems.
I suppose that depends on whether you care to get the exact colors captured, compared to having something that looks good enough. My experience has been that slide film is actually more difficult to color match, because the shadows are so much more dense than on a negative, making the actual scanning more frustrating.

Often, I've found that Digikam's auto levels smooths out bad colors, but that's another post-process step.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
bw, c-41, color, epson, film, lab, photography, roll, scan, scanner, scans, software
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Nature Wrong Lens, Wrong time, Wrong…………. lukulele Post Your Photos! 4 05-08-2014 03:11 AM
pro-lab scans better than drugstore scans? drumhead Pentax Film SLR Discussion 27 09-07-2011 03:21 PM
3D CT scans of my broken shoulder and ribs (warning graphic) xs400 General Talk 10 10-30-2009 10:50 PM
My first scans! BernardMarx Pentax Film SLR Discussion 5 06-23-2009 05:26 PM
some B&W film scans from my Killarney trip Gooshin Post Your Photos! 10 08-31-2008 05:13 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:41 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top