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05-06-2018, 07:38 AM - 2 Likes   #1
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Scanning slide film, color vibrance

I got back my first roll of slide film and I'm very impressed with the results. In particular, colors have something I was never able to get from negatives. I use a simple flatbed scanner, Epson V370. Comparing below vs Ektar, which I like a lot.

Any advice on how I could get closer to these tones when scanning negatives?

Ektar (negative):


Velvia 50 (slide):



Last edited by aaacb; 05-06-2018 at 07:59 AM. Reason: updated title
05-06-2018, 08:40 AM   #2
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I'm far from being a scanning expert, but I have similar issues as you do with some slide film.

I use Silverfast s/w on my scanner and it's pretty good doing most slide film but really good with Kodachrome. (Silverfast s/w has a built in Kodachrome profile, so the results are very good)

So getting other Kodak/Fuji E6 films like Velvia to pop will require mucking with the s/w settings or you need to do it with your PP s/w afterwards.

My scanner does not do 120 film, so I use my local lab for scanning my 6x7 E6 work and they do a really good job. Worth the extra money and I get 8-10 MB TIF files back that I can play with in Photoshop if desired.

I don't have the patience to do mess with either the Silverfast scanning s/w or Photoshop very much, so hopefully you have better luck and someone with better knowledge will give you some more usefull tips.

Phil.
05-06-2018, 09:39 AM - 2 Likes   #3
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E6 slide film has a different look than c41 negative film. I'm not sure that you can expect to ever obtain the same exact look. Velvia has limited dynamic range and while very sharp for a slide film, part of its apparent sharpness is a result of its high contrast. It's very difficult to recover shadow detail from Velvia. I looked at the specs of your scanner and it is an entry level scanner with a lower DMAX rating than other scanners that Epson produces. Although I no longer shoot film, I owed an Imacon/Hasselblad film scanner for years, and it gave far better results than several Epson flatbed scanners that I owned. A dedicated film scanner will likely get you closer to the results you're looking to achieve.
05-06-2018, 10:46 AM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by aaacb Quote
I got back my first roll of slide film and I'm very impressed with the results. In particular, colors have something I was never able to get from negatives. I use a simple flatbed scanner, Epson V370. Comparing below vs Ektar, which I like a lot.

Any advice on how I could get closer to these tones when scanning negatives?
How do you even know that the results you are getting from Kodak Ektar 100 is supposed to look like that?

All color negatives go through interpretation by the hardware/software/settings of your scanning system and although slides do to, you have the original as a point of reference.

Fuji Velvia has a different interpretation of color and contrast then Kodak Ektar 100. So to get closer results to Velvia will require that you apply post work with Ektar to interpret how Velvia would look under those settings. Of course that would mean you know how Velvia would react in all the possible scene variations. It goes without saying that this cannot be done and all the Fuji Velvia emulation software out there simply applies what programmers think Velvia should look like as opposed to how it really looks. This kinda reminds me of the scene in the Matrix about how did the machines figure out what chicken taste like . . .

My examples of Fuji Velvia (original)



Kodak Ektar 100



05-06-2018, 12:10 PM - 1 Like   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by CDW Quote
E6 slide film has a different look than c41 negative film. I'm not sure that you can expect to ever obtain the same exact look. Velvia has limited dynamic range and while very sharp for a slide film, part of its apparent sharpness is a result of its high contrast. It's very difficult to recover shadow detail from Velvia. I looked at the specs of your scanner and it is an entry level scanner with a lower DMAX rating than other scanners that Epson produces. A dedicated film scanner will likely get you closer to the results you're looking to achieve.
+1 CDW. The orange stain on color negs helps to reduce contrast, but slide films with no stain are inherently higher contrast and colors will be more saturated.

Iʻm a HUGE Ektar fan, but if you want more of the vibrancy from your film that is similar to slides, you need to use an emulsion that is less color accurate and more saturated such as Fujifilm Fujicolor Superia X-TRA 400 or Kodak GC/UltraMax 400 and shoot at EI 200 for +1EV overexposure.

Ultimately, if you want the look of slides, you should shoot slides. No amount of good scanning and post processing will match it exactly.
05-06-2018, 02:06 PM   #6
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Thanks all for your answers.

QuoteOriginally posted by Alex645 Quote
Ultimately, if you want the look of slides, you should shoot slides.
Agreed, I would rather use different types of film than pp against the way a certain film renders.
05-07-2018, 04:11 AM - 1 Like   #7
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Sorry but IMHO is a nonsense to shot with a film and to want another film's color rendition....
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