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01-27-2020, 05:23 PM   #16
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So I've been doing a lot of good research on the processes. I've also taken the advice of you guys and other people online, and I've figured out how to read the different process(es) for films. Then I'm going to my gigantic bible of photographic development, and it has a great guide for developing film by processes. However, my new question is, I found a few rolls of vintage Ektachrome (yes, I'm hung-up on shooting vintage/expired until I get my processes down) and am unsure of how well developing E-6 at home would be. I know it's not as intensive and difficult as K-14, but Is this something that I should do at home or just send it out?

01-27-2020, 07:25 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by bikehead90 Quote
So I've been doing a lot of good research on the processes. I've also taken the advice of you guys and other people online, and I've figured out how to read the different process(es) for films. Then I'm going to my gigantic bible of photographic development, and it has a great guide for developing film by processes. However, my new question is, I found a few rolls of vintage Ektachrome (yes, I'm hung-up on shooting vintage/expired until I get my processes down) and am unsure of how well developing E-6 at home would be. I know it's not as intensive and difficult as K-14, but Is this something that I should do at home or just send it out?
So, my bible is the Photo Lab Index: Lifetime Edition. Now that I realize just what goes into development processes, it all makes sense to me now.
01-27-2020, 07:53 PM   #18
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I can't comment directly on E-6 development but it looks pretty similar to C-41 which I've done. It's not hard. I would suggest as the others have to start with B&W unless you're really hung up on developing color films first. In the end I think the initial challenges that kind of scared me and at times were real issues was the "mechanical" aspects; working in a pure dark room, getting the film loaded onto the development reels properly and reliably, that kind of thing. There are youtube videos that show all of this, with lights on obviously, which is how I learned. I used the phone app from Massive Dev Chart which gives timers for all of the different steps of the process.

My first and so far only developer that I've used is Clayton F76+. That and their Rapid Fixer have treated me pretty well. Both come as a liquid. I use plastic development tanks with plastic reels which I think works pretty well. After developing a few rolls of film I will put the reels used in a delicate laundry bag and toss in with my laundry to keep them clean. Have done it a couple dozen times and it's been fine and makes it easy to load film onto the reels. This may not be a popular thing to do so you do you on this one; otherwise it's scrubbing them with a toothbrush which also works.


A quart of F76 and a quart of Rapid Fixer is about $25. I use Tetenal stop bath and wetting agent. Those chems and a couple gallons of distilled water and you're on your way. A quart of F76 will develop about 20 rolls of film, maybe more if you try to be really efficient with developer, but that can be problematic.
01-27-2020, 11:08 PM   #19
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@Bikehead90 I haven't done color developing at home yet (still on the fence about whether to try it) but I would strongly suggest starting with B&W. As I understand it one of the very important aspects of E6 (or C41) is temperature control, and the temps are a lot higher for color (unless you want a 50-minute development cycle). B&W is done at 68 degrees, pretty much room temperature, and I can tell you that even getting those temps right can be a challenge. Also as I understand it the color chemicals are a lot nastier than B&W.

I say crawl, then walk. And soon you'll be telling me how to develop E6!

Aaron

PS My HC-110 experience is a bit frustrating (esp. with my beloved HP5) but I'm getting there. It's a learning process. I think D76 or a "D76 compatible" is best for starting.

01-28-2020, 01:34 AM - 1 Like   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by bikehead90 Quote
my new question is, I found a few rolls of vintage Ektachrome (yes, I'm hung-up on shooting vintage/expired until I get my processes down) and am unsure of how well developing E-6 at home would be. I know it's not as intensive and difficult as K-14, but Is this something that I should do at home or just send it out?
In order of difficulty from least to most:
B&W, C41, E6, K14.

If you like challenges and are not worried about frustrating trials and errors, then go for it with the E6. However, it's not pain free to shoot a roll of E6, spend money and time on the chemistry, only to get poor results. I've done it all and my best experiences with color chems was P30 Ciba or Ilfochrome. The rest is really a matter of nailing temperatures and times with swings in density, contrast, and color balance that can be confounding without a ton of patience, information, and precision.

B&W is almost always best done at home. Color is best done by pros, ideally with machines, unless you just want to scratch an itch.
01-28-2020, 02:29 AM   #21
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Try this :

Ilford Monochrome Darkroom Practice: A Manual of Black and White Processing and Printing by Jack H. Coote
01-28-2020, 08:26 AM   #22
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I'm doing C-41 and E-6 regularly at home. I use a "sans air" like water heater and I have Jobo processor, which is not mandatory, but easier.
01-28-2020, 08:36 AM   #23
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C-41 is not that hard. The Tentanal Colortec C-41 developing kit gives a time for alternate development at 86F/30C temperature.

Example:





Last edited by tuco; 01-28-2020 at 08:42 AM.
01-28-2020, 06:30 PM   #24
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Wow, @Tuco, that's a spectacular shot. What film were you using?
01-28-2020, 10:30 PM - 1 Like   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by Autonerd Quote
Wow, @Tuco, that's a spectacular shot. What film were you using?
Thanks. Fuji Pro 400H
02-03-2020, 07:29 AM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
C-41 is not that hard. The Tentanal Colortec C-41 developing kit gives a time for alternate development at 86F/30C temperature.

Example:


That photo is spectacular!

---------- Post added 02-03-20 at 07:32 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Alex645 Quote
In order of difficulty from least to most:
B&W, C41, E6, K14.

If you like challenges and are not worried about frustrating trials and errors, then go for it with the E6. However, it's not pain free to shoot a roll of E6, spend money and time on the chemistry, only to get poor results. I've done it all and my best experiences with color chems was P30 Ciba or Ilfochrome. The rest is really a matter of nailing temperatures and times with swings in density, contrast, and color balance that can be confounding without a ton of patience, information, and precision.

B&W is almost always best done at home. Color is best done by pros, ideally with machines, unless you just want to scratch an itch.
Thatís less than... reassuring *nervous laugh* most of the film I have is C-41. Iíve only got 2 rolls of Tri-X, and 2 P3200. Where can I get my color developed for a reasonable cost (as well as get my negatives back).
02-03-2020, 08:26 AM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by bikehead90 Quote
That photo is spectacular!
Why thanks. I would rather have not cut off the circle on the right side. I did take one with it included and it's a better composition but the colors of the YoYo change and it was a green/yellow combo which I didn't like as much as this color combo.
02-03-2020, 09:10 AM   #28
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QuoteOriginally posted by bikehead90 Quote
Where can I get my color developed for a reasonable cost (as well as get my negatives back).
If there are no local labs near you, Dwayne's Photo has one of the most affordable and consistent quality mail order options for C41 processing:
Processing and printing of color negative film - develop and print - great prices from a trusted name for over 50 years - Dwayne's Photo Service
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