Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
08-23-2021, 06:20 AM   #1
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Ireland
Posts: 991
Scanning Methods ?

My Epson 3170 from way back is on its last legs.

It seems to me that there are now 2 ways to scan, I suppose really digitise, both negatives (mostly discovered 6 x 9cm from long ago) and prints:

A - Buy a new scanner of which the best specified and affordable I can find is the Epson V600 @ around €330, the v850 is obviously better but at least 3 times the price.

B - Use my Pentax (K-70) with a macro lens mounted on my old enlarger column and a light table for negatives and a bit of studio lighting for prints. I have a light table and some studio lighting. I have an 50mm M F4.0 lens.

The question I have is does one have a particular technical advantage over another, ignore the cash saving of the Pentax system.

Kind regards

CD

08-23-2021, 06:34 AM   #2
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 588
I'm no expert but I would go with either option B or the V850, the V600 will take you only so far.
08-23-2021, 06:51 AM   #3
Forum Member




Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 90
Depends on your final/future needs/use for the works being copied. Ultimately for your situation I think using your camera would be better in that once you get set up it will likely go faster than using a flatbed and cost less. This will be somewhat dependent on the the flatness of the film and prints and/or your ability get them that way, and the volume being copied.
08-23-2021, 07:08 AM   #4
Pentaxian
photoptimist's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2016
Photos: Albums
Posts: 4,728
A film scanner will have biggest advantages of: 1) automagical color-conversions for negatives; 2) less hassles in set-up of the rig, lighting, focus, & exposure.

Your K-70 will have biggest advantages of: 1) cheaper; 2) probably faster times per negative or print.

08-23-2021, 07:15 AM   #5
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Idaho
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,542
Some scanners have the advantage of automatic dust & scratch removal which can save you tons of time in retouching dust specks and scratches with the camera method. If you use a camera, you get what you see. There can also be advantages offered by scanner software which you would have to implement in a camera "scan" using post-processing. Camera scanning can be faster otherwise since most bed scanners take a "bit" longer to accomplish a scan compared to pushing a shutter button.
08-23-2021, 07:46 AM   #6
Pentaxian




Join Date: May 2016
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 3,262
I used to have a v370 but i can't get ot to work anymore because of drivers problems on linux; probably fixable but i didn't have time. So I've been scanning with the k1ii, 100macro and lightpad. If you're used to editing the scans, dslr is probably a little nicer since it's all the same interface you process raw anyway. But it's also more fiddly to setup, just this weekend i asked the lab to scan in addition to developing because they're family snaps and I'm not culling much.

Last edited by aaacb; 08-23-2021 at 08:01 AM.
08-23-2021, 09:41 AM   #7
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
grog85361's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Phoenix Arizona
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 817
Since you have all the elements to "camera scan", do a quick set up and see if the process and results suit you. All it will cost is a bit of time. I have recently experimented with using a camera and macro lens to "scan" transparencies. The result, even with a micro 4/3 camera, are much better and faster than I can get with a Canon 9000F ii. Based on that I am planning to fabricate a more permanent fixture for "camera digitizing".

Best wishes!

08-23-2021, 10:07 AM   #8
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Aug 2020
Location: Caledon, Ontario, Canada
Photos: Albums
Posts: 317
In addition to all the other good advice here, I would suggest you consider what you wish to do with the scans -- print, web display, or archive digitally. If you're looking at making large prints and want the best resolution and tonal range, then the dslr method will give you better output than a flatbed scanner will. I have a Canon 9950F flatbed and it definitely has limits to the enlargement sizes I can get out of medium format negs. OTOH, scanning with my K5ii and 50mm macro lens allows me to break up a 120 neg into sections and stich them together in software (Microsoft ICE) to make a single scan. The sky's the limit as to the resolution you can get with this method, and it can pull more detail out of shadows. However, a single neg takes a bit of work to shoot multiple sections and then stitch. But for a high quality wall display print it's worth it.

If for web display or archiving purposes, a flatbed will probably serve you just as well as a dslr. Comes down to convenience and speed then.
08-23-2021, 10:37 AM   #9
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
pres589's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Wichita, KS
Photos: Albums
Posts: 3,730
I copy my negatives with my K-5 II and a 105mm macro lens like described in your option B. The problem I have in recommending it to others is the software side of things; the best solution I've found is Negative Lab Pro plug-in with Lightroom 6. This works well but requires an existing copy of Lightroom 6; Negative Lab works with Lightroom CC but I don't want to move to subscription based software and I don't want to recommend it to others. The creator of Negative Lab has stated he has no interest (last I checked) to port his plug-in to some other platform.

I really like the output I get from the above combination but if I were to do it again today I would probably just buy a good scanner. Should be faster and a bit easier to get very similar output and I don't have to worry about the next time I set up a computer or re-install Windows and not having Lightroom working again.
08-23-2021, 01:55 PM   #10
Pentaxian




Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: NY
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 4,979
I used an Epson V700 (flatbed scanner) to scan negatives that I had (35 mm film). It did really well. I saved the files as TIF files. I used a 35 mm holder that came with the scanner.
08-23-2021, 04:04 PM   #11
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Sioux City, IA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 928
QuoteOriginally posted by pres589 Quote
I copy my negatives with my K-5 II and a 105mm macro lens like described in your option B. The problem I have in recommending it to others is the software side of things; the best solution I've found is Negative Lab Pro plug-in with Lightroom 6. This works well but requires an existing copy of Lightroom 6; Negative Lab works with Lightroom CC but I don't want to move to subscription based software and I don't want to recommend it to others. The creator of Negative Lab has stated he has no interest (last I checked) to port his plug-in to some other platform.
RawTherapee and DarkTable both have negative processing capabilities. Snappiness has done some videos on YouTube about how he uses them along with his K-1 to digitize negatives. That said, having watched a number of videos comparing Negative Lab Pro to those options, NLP is definitely easier to use. I don’t get the aversion to the Adobe Photography plan. $9.99/mo gets you constant updates to fix bugs and add features. BTW, there is no product called Lightroom CC any more. You have Lightroom Classic, which is the ongoing evolution of Lightroom 6, and Lightroom, which is the less featured (No print module? WTF, Adobe?), cloud-based version. Scott Kelby tends to call it Lightroom Cloud, but he recently called it Lightroom for Children, and I think that is an even more accurate name.
08-23-2021, 04:08 PM   #12
UMC
Senior Member
UMC's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Vienna
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 192
I have summarized my experience in digitizing (meanwhile 25k Slides) in these posts:
35mm negative scanner - PentaxForums.com
Slide and neg scanner.... - PentaxForums.com
Bottom line: If the majority of your material to scan is B&W, there is nothing wrong in chosing the camera method - apart from the dust issue. If you talk about color, go for the Epson V500/V550 line.
08-23-2021, 05:24 PM   #13
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
pres589's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Wichita, KS
Photos: Albums
Posts: 3,730
mtkeller, Adobe shows LR Classic as part of the cloud suite now. Not getting further into the weeds on this one as it really isn't inline with the rest of the thread.
08-24-2021, 01:31 AM   #14
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Ireland
Posts: 991
Original Poster
Thank you for all your kind advice, it is swinging me towards the DIY camera method, I shall wander off down to my garden shed and experiment.

Viking 42 struck a memory chord with regard to large prints, back in the early 60's I took a sheet of A1 size dyeline print paper, selotaped it to my bedroom wall and used a Gnome push pull slide projector to project a B & W neg onto it, took a long time but I did get a rather grainy image out of it. Downside - my mother was not pleased with the sellotape damage to the wall paper - you can't think of everything.

CD
08-24-2021, 03:45 AM   #15
Pentaxian
Jonathan Mac's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Madrid, Spain
Posts: 8,355
Scanning with a DSLR will get you much sharper results but the colour will be completely wrong due to the orange mask. To correct that you'll need to be proficient in the use of a suitable software program. The one that is dedicated to doing that is Negative Lab Pro which is a Lightroom plug-in and costs around 100 €/$ on top of what Lightroom costs.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
epson, film, lens, light, negatives, pentax, photography, prints, studio, table
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Alternative methods to de-yellow your lenses without the discontinued JANSJÖ Lamp tsoybeans Pentax Lens Articles 10 07-02-2021 08:07 AM
Methods for leatherette removal and preservation? Aaron28 Pentax Film SLR Discussion 7 05-09-2021 04:36 PM
Overview of digital camera colour detection methods dosdan Photographic Technique 3 10-09-2011 01:14 PM
Cleaning lens - your methods CRMassart Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 27 04-08-2010 04:36 PM
Need help with lens testing methods JohnBee Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 4 12-24-2009 09:29 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:34 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top