Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
11-26-2021, 03:51 PM - 2 Likes   #16
Pentaxian
StiffLegged's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2018
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 3,403
I still remember the afternoon making a multi-exposure print with Wish You Were Here on constant replay. I can still remember the smell of Ilford Rapid Fixer each time the opening is played.

11-26-2021, 04:23 PM - 1 Like   #17
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Prince George, BC
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 3,460
Way to go, Mike! Good results. Re. leaving enough hanging leader: usually if one end is too short, the other end has enough. It doesn't matter which end you hang your film from. Not long ago, I decided to change my final rinse formula a bit by adding two drops of dish detergent. Hung it on the line and got back to cleaning up. Then I heard a Smack! Turned around and found the rolll of 120 on the floor! What was an invincible grip on dry film turned out to be an extremely slippery grip with the detergent and it had worked itself out of the clip. Lots of grunge to clean up in post after that lesson. I now use a clip with knobbies on it for a more secure grip.

Jack
11-26-2021, 04:25 PM - 1 Like   #18
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
ChrisPlatt's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Rockaway Beach NYC
Posts: 7,320
Congratulations! Like most things it gets easier with experience.

120 film is more difficult to load on plastic reels than 35mm which is less likely to buckle.
Some off brand films are coated on a thinner base which can cause a great deal of difficulty.

For your next roll be absolutely sure reels are scrupulously dry to avoid jamming.
Even if not used for months I use a portable hair dryer on mine prior to loading.
I give the same treatment to the tank, changing bag and even my hands.

Chris
11-26-2021, 04:32 PM - 1 Like   #19
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
jumbleview's Avatar

Join Date: May 2012
Location: Concord, CA
Posts: 950
QuoteOriginally posted by BigMackCam Quote
I used a Soviet Blik rangefinder - hand-held...
Oh Mine God! I had Smena-6 range finder camera. I had a problem with focusing it till I bought this device. Alas, I did not keep it (and camera as well) through all my moving across apartments, countries and continents. I so regret of not keeping it (as well as my father's Zorkij 4).

11-26-2021, 04:33 PM - 3 Likes   #20
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter




Join Date: Nov 2015
Photos: Albums
Posts: 3,416
QuoteOriginally posted by jbinpg Quote
Way to go, Mike! Good results. Re. leaving enough hanging leader: usually if one end is too short, the other end has enough. It doesn't matter which end you hang your film from. Not long ago, I decided to change my final rinse formula a bit by adding two drops of dish detergent. Hung it on the line and got back to cleaning up. Then I heard a Smack! Turned around and found the rolll of 120 on the floor! What was an invincible grip on dry film turned out to be an extremely slippery grip with the detergent and it had worked itself out of the clip. Lots of grunge to clean up in post after that lesson. I now use a clip with knobbies on it for a more secure grip.

Jack
We often hung 35mm film from paper clips through the sprocket holes.
It looks ridiculous, but it never slips...

-Eric
11-26-2021, 11:57 PM - 1 Like   #21
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Central Coast, CA
Posts: 1,227
You could look at the ebay pricing of the solid boxes minilabs used as a mini darkroom. I got a larger one for around $100 because it needed new elastic sewed into the arm sleeves a few years back. Less fighting the changing bag. Get dimensions to make sure you things will fit.
11-27-2021, 12:25 AM   #22
-
Loyal Site Supporter




Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 18,745
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by pentaxus Quote
You could look at the ebay pricing of the solid boxes minilabs used as a mini darkroom. I got a larger one for around $100 because it needed new elastic sewed into the arm sleeves a few years back. Less fighting the changing bag. Get dimensions to make sure you things will fit.
Yeah... I don't want to exaggerate the issue with the changing bag. I got on OK with it - I just found it somewhat smaller than expected, and the sagging "roof" was a little annoying... but it performed its intended role admirably. Plus, I can set it up in my study, dining room or kitchen as the mood takes me, and it takes up virtually zero space when folded away for storage, so it's very convenient. I think it's just a matter of getting used to it

11-27-2021, 01:18 AM - 1 Like   #23
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Lancaster
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 3,627
QuoteOriginally posted by BigMackCam Quote
Yeah... I don't want to exaggerate the issue with the changing bag. I got on OK with it - I just found it somewhat smaller than expected, and the sagging "roof" was a little annoying... but it performed its intended role admirably. Plus, I can set it up in my study, dining room or kitchen as the mood takes me, and it takes up virtually zero space when folded away for storage, so it's very convenient. I think it's just a matter of getting used to it
Here's a thought, could you use a couple of kitchen towel inner sleeves to hold the roof up? What I forgot to ask, which camera was it?
11-27-2021, 01:30 AM   #24
-
Loyal Site Supporter




Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 18,745
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by StiffLegged Quote
Good shadow details there Mike, so the exposures weren't far off. Congratulations on your first trip through the soup!
Thanks I tried to err on the side of mild over-exposure - which mostly worked, although I misjudged a couple of shots... No biggie, though.

QuoteOriginally posted by jbinpg Quote
Way to go, Mike! Good results. Re. leaving enough hanging leader: usually if one end is too short, the other end has enough. It doesn't matter which end you hang your film from. Not long ago, I decided to change my final rinse formula a bit by adding two drops of dish detergent. Hung it on the line and got back to cleaning up. Then I heard a Smack! Turned around and found the rolll of 120 on the floor! What was an invincible grip on dry film turned out to be an extremely slippery grip with the detergent and it had worked itself out of the clip. Lots of grunge to clean up in post after that lesson. I now use a clip with knobbies on it for a more secure grip.
Thank you, Jack I'm pleased to know I'm not the only one who makes the occasional mistake

For hanging, I was using a pair of steel clips - one weighted, the other not. Being 120, the starting end of the film was untrimmed and had plenty of room for the clip; it was the other end - where I'd cut off the adhesive strip - that was too short. I didn't think to hang it without the weighted clip at the bottom... If I make the same mistake in future, I'll try that. I will say, this Fomapan 200 is springy stuff after drying. Little in the way of bowing or buckling, but very springy. I wonder if it would have been worse still without the weighted clip...

Regarding final rinse, I've only just realised I could have bought a 5L bottle of Bio D unfragranced washing-up liquid for not much more than I paid for my little 100ml bottle of Adox AdoFlo II Oh well... when I eventually use that up, I'll switch to Bio D

QuoteOriginally posted by ChrisPlatt Quote
Congratulations! Like most things it gets easier with experience.

120 film is more difficult to load on plastic reels than 35mm which is less likely to buckle.
Some off brand films are coated on a thinner base which can cause a great deal of difficulty.

For your next roll be absolutely sure reels are scrupulously dry to avoid jamming.
Even if not used for months I use a portable hair dryer on mine prior to loading.
I give the same treatment to the tank, changing bag and even my hands.
Cheers, Chris - I'll be sure to use the hairdryer on everything before my next session. Fomapan 200 uses a very thin base, I'm told, which is somewhat confirmed by the amount of wiggle room when running it through my digitising film holder...

QuoteOriginally posted by jumbleview Quote
Oh Mine God! I had Smena-6 range finder camera. I had a problem with focusing it till I bought this device. Alas, I did not keep it (and camera as well) through all my moving across apartments, countries and continents. I so regret of not keeping it (as well as my father's Zorkij 4).
I'd love to pick up a Smena-6 in nice condition. I have a Smena-8m which uses a later version of the same T-43 40mm f/4 triplet lens, so the image quality should be very similar or even identical - but the Smena-6 body is much nicer-looking, and the shutter release button is better (anything is better than the one on the 8m )...
11-27-2021, 01:30 AM - 1 Like   #25
Pentaxian




Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Sydney
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 897
Just try loading film during a humid Sydney summer. The developing bag becomes a sauna. You have about five minutes before everything sticks to everything else. It's a reason I bought a Samigon reel. It has big plastic feeders which are easy to find and thread in a dark bag.
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/122989-REG/Samigon_ESA325_Multi_Forma...981&
11-27-2021, 02:22 AM   #26
-
Loyal Site Supporter




Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 18,745
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by Cerebum Quote
Here's a thought, could you use a couple of kitchen towel inner sleeves to hold the roof up?
That's an interesting idea - but I'm not sure I'd want to take up any more room inside the bag than absolutely necessary Honestly, it's fine - I just need to get used to it. A pop-up dark tent might be a bit easier, but for now I'll persevere with the bag...

QuoteOriginally posted by Cerebum Quote
What I forgot to ask, which camera was it?
1962 Agfa Isola II with 75mm f/6.3 triplet lens

QuoteOriginally posted by officiousbystander Quote
Just try loading film during a humid Sydney summer. The developing bag becomes a sauna. You have about five minutes before everything sticks to everything else. It's a reason I bought a Samigon reel. It has big plastic feeders which are easy to find and thread in a dark bag.
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/122989-REG/Samigon_ESA325_Multi_Forma...981&
I can only imagine what it's like to work in that heat and humidity

The reels that came with my AP tank look almost identical to that Samigon reel... It's one of the reasons the AP system is becoming quite popular, apparently; that, and the fact that the tank doesn't leak during inversions...
11-27-2021, 03:13 AM   #27
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Lancaster
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 3,627
QuoteOriginally posted by BigMackCam Quote


1962 Agfa Isola II with 75mm f/6.3 triplet lens


.
That Agfa is lovely. It must be so satisfying to use. The IQ is great. Isn't it funny how much we appreciate stuff that ten years ago we would have thrown away. I am jonesing for an Olympus trip, but I am not doing enough film shooting at the moment. I have some doublefilm bubblegum in my MX and am only half way through after three weeks. I also have some Rollei retro 400s mono in my spotty, once again, half used. The light at the moment is poor, also, I am committed to single in challenges. This month is the 35mm f2 that you recommended. What a good call that was re. the film, the bubblegum is modified to give the colours more of a pastel hue. It was expensive though so I don't want to waste it in bad light. Re. the fomo, so far I haven't got high contrast shots. Its nice, especially for the price but the blacks haven't been blacketyblack. The standard Rollei 400 rpx was nice, as was the ilford xp400. Next on the list is some Agfa 400 apx
11-27-2021, 04:03 AM   #28
-
Loyal Site Supporter




Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 18,745
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by Cerebum Quote
That Agfa is lovely. It must be so satisfying to use. The IQ is great.
Cheers It's a really nice camera, and surprisingly well engineered - the lens unit is extended by twisting against a spring, after which the self-cocking shutter is enabled - but it only fires when you've advanced to a new frame, preventing the risk of double exposures (though some folks would see that as a limitation ). And yes - the lens really is surprisingly good, especially considering the simple formula. Isolas are so cheap to buy, too. The Isola I only had one shutter speed - 1/35s - plus B mode, and a choice of f/11 or f/16. The Isola II I'm using adds a 1/100s shutter speed, and the aperture choices are more useful at f/6.3 and f/11...

QuoteOriginally posted by Cerebum Quote
Isn't it funny how much we appreciate stuff that ten years ago we would have thrown away. I am jonesing for an Olympus trip...
Indeed, there's definitely an increasing appreciation for earlier film gear. There's still plenty of bargains to be had on some really interesting old cameras, but I suspect the prices will begin to creep up. Olympus Trips are definitely increasing in price. I have two Trip 35s that I bought years ago, both in great condition with working selenium metering. This weekend I'll be replacing the light seals on one of them and using it for the first time on my next outing

QuoteOriginally posted by Cerebum Quote
... I am not doing enough film shooting at the moment. I have some doublefilm bubblegum in my MX and am only half way through after three weeks. I also have some Rollei retro 400s mono in my spotty, once again, half used. The light at the moment is poor...
I haven't been doing enough photography, period. Getting started with film is encouraging me to get out more... but, as you say, the light is poor - and it's getting cold outside I'd hoped to get out today for a couple of hours, but the winds up here are horrendous.

QuoteOriginally posted by Cerebum Quote
... also, I am committed to single in challenges. This month is the 35mm f2 that you recommended. What a good call that was re. the film, the bubblegum is modified to give the colours more of a pastel hue. It was expensive though so I don't want to waste it in bad light. Re. the fomo, so far I haven't got high contrast shots. Its nice, especially for the price but the blacks haven't been blacketyblack. The standard Rollei 400 rpx was nice, as was the ilford xp400. Next on the list is some Agfa 400 apx
I'm so pleased you like the FA35/2 @stevebrot is a big fan, and I seem to recall it was his opinion / experience / satisfaction with it that encouraged me to acquire my HD version, and I love it... a really capable lens.

I'm interested to hear of your experiences with various films, as I'd like to try some others too... though I won't be buying any until well into next year. I have some more rolls of Fomapan 200 in 120 to get through first; also some Ilford HP5+ 400 in 120, and five 35mm rolls of Fomapan 400. Even with my current enthusiasm, it'll be months before I've used up that little lot

Regarding contrast and deeper blacks, maybe pushing one stop might help? Also, I wonder if it might be an issue with digitising and post-processing... or can you tell from looking at the negatives?

Last edited by BigMackCam; 11-27-2021 at 06:30 AM.
11-27-2021, 07:31 AM - 1 Like   #29
Moderator
Not a Number's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Venice, CA
Posts: 9,549
QuoteOriginally posted by BigMackCam Quote
2. Use smaller scissors in the changing bag
Buy a pair of straight bandage scissors - the type used by medical doctors, first responders etc. to cut off bandages or clothing. They come in a variety of sizes, are sharp and can be found inexpensively on eBay.

QuoteOriginally posted by BigMackCam Quote
5. Label all jugs of solution
Mark them with stripes - tape would do. One stripe for developer. Two for Stop Bath. Three for fixer. More if you get into color developing. With color most of the solutions are different colors so you may not need to label all of them but it helps when you refill the bottles.
11-27-2021, 08:35 AM - 1 Like   #30
Forum Member
Flylooper's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: McKenzie River Valley, Oregon
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 80
Oh, Gosh! I used to do my own B/W developing way back in the 1970's. I used to buy bulk rolls of Tri-X. It was an arduous process (I set up a "lab"' in the basement of my parents' house.) but loads of fun when the finished product was something you could be excited about. Biggest problem I had, IIRC, was dust. I'm still shooting film a lot but now I print negs (developed at a local lab) via a Canon scanner, Doggone computers really solved a ton of problems for me. Thank God for Photoshop Elements.


Your shots are very interesting. Congrats.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
bag, bit, cut, film, fixer, photography, roll, solution, strip, water
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Focus screen replacement and lessons learned jcdoss Pentax K-1 & K-1 II 13 09-23-2020 07:13 PM
Film woes (mistakes and lessons learned) Femto1969 Film Processing, Scanning, and Darkroom 19 07-21-2017 11:47 AM
Initial impressions / lessons learned from first solo show frogoutofwater General Photography 3 06-22-2016 07:51 AM
Telephoto Lens, Tripod and Lessons Learned - the hard way interested_observer Photographic Technique 10 01-27-2013 10:00 PM
Got my first roll developed, and many of my shots came back noisy. Is this due to... Codazzle Film SLRs and Compact Film Cameras 10 11-19-2012 01:59 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:38 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top