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07-11-2012, 05:01 PM   #31
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QuoteOriginally posted by disco_owner Quote
yeah , same here. I'm starting to get withdrawl symptoms from not having my K5 I need a K5 Fix.......

Edit: I will Definitely look at getting a Cleaning Kit.
The Pentax lollypop is so well regarded that even Nikon users praise it

08-15-2012, 12:26 AM   #32
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Well the camera is now back again from CR kennedy repairs for 2nd time. there are no longer dead pixels on my images and the dark spots are not visible. I'm just happy to have recieved the K5 back so I can get out there and start shooting. Thanks again for the Help and assistance . I feel silly for assuming that the spots weren't dust. as for the dead pixels I'm still not sure what they did to address this issue.
08-15-2012, 12:47 AM   #33
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enable dust removal on
Startup action and
Shutdown action
Pixel Mapping can "Check the image sensor and corrects defective pixels"
all in Menu's
08-15-2012, 12:57 AM   #34
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I'm familiar with the camera's functions , the dead pixel mapping was carried out previous stated in my post earlier but it didn't address all the dead pixels. as for dust removal it doesn't completely remove all dust have tried this already.

08-15-2012, 01:14 AM   #35
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Was it dust or oil? Some of the spots look like liquid to me in the 100% image. The round spots are soft at the edges with a radial blur effect that makes me think 'oil spreading'.
08-15-2012, 01:40 AM   #36
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get an AirBrush

QuoteOriginally posted by disco_owner Quote
I'm familiar with the camera's functions , the dead pixel mapping was carried out previous stated in my post earlier but it didn't address all the dead pixels. as for dust removal it doesn't completely remove all dust have tried this already.
OK, I change lenses a lot and the only once in my whole time with Pentax DSLR's I had to perform the wet dust removal year ago on my K-7
otherwise I use AirBrush / Airduster ( compressed air in a can, there are a few available, right now have Electrolube), excellent performer without need of physical contact. Can get them for ~ $20 and it lasts for months.
08-15-2012, 02:19 AM   #37
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QuoteOriginally posted by bossa Quote
Was it dust or oil? Some of the spots look like liquid to me in the 100% image. The round spots are soft at the edges with a radial blur effect that makes me think 'oil spreading'.
I don't know. it probably may well have been oil . all I could make out from the job repair card is that "Sensor was cleaned" but when speaking to CR Kennedy's in Melbourne the service department head says he needed to speak to his tech who is at another location.
08-15-2012, 01:27 PM   #38
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Hey, are those HDR shots? And did you use a ND filter as well? Really nice work. If they are HDR, what are you using for PP? Thanks!

08-15-2012, 02:24 PM   #39
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Hi qwntm , I use a combination of programs , namely OLONEO and win7 photoediting software. OLONEO mainly to increase tonal mapping strength etc . You can download it from their website and try it out to see if you like the program. One of the kind members on here put me on to the program and I use it a lot .
08-15-2012, 05:20 PM   #40
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ryan Trevisol Quote
...using a rocket blower before mounting the new lens.
Hi

Well intentioned thought, but no, no, no, don't do it !

When you are out on location in an uncontrolled environment and start blowing around aimlessly at the mount end of the lens (zoom lens) or the open camera mount you run a grave danger of ectually blowing dust, pollen or anything that floats around into the lens or open camera.

Also never use a blower to de-dust the mount end of a zoom lens because you will blow dust and dirt into the lens barrel. Unlike the mirror chamber of your cam where dust can escape through the opening if you are lucky and where you have access to the sensor if you blow dirt on it, this is not possible with a lens.

Dust from the mount end of a zoom lens should only be removed with a brush when the last lens element is at its highest point at the end ! Once dust is blown into the barrel of the lens it will never come back out, unless the lens is disassembled.

Sometimes an instinctively and seemingly logical procedure carried out at the spur of a moment... when you give it a thought is not so good after all.

Greetings
08-15-2012, 08:24 PM   #41
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You seem to have missed the part right before the part you quoted:
QuoteQuote:
always change lenses in a sheltered area
My definition of a sheltered area is off the street, away from dirt, sand, etc. If I have to change lenses outside or, worse, at the beach or other dusty environment, of course I would never use a rocket blower. Ducking into a shop (not a book shop) and changing the lens over a counter or my sling bag is about as controlled an environment as I could expect at home, and if I had previously been in a dusty environment, I would use the rocket blower on the outside first, then move away from the cloud of dust and change the lens, again using the rocket blower.
And of course I wouldn't use the blower on the hind end of a zoom lens. Where did I say that?
Again, I appreciate your concern but as I mentioned I used the K-x for 2+ years and I got two specs of dust on the sensor after the 2 year mark. If my method were prone to blowing my mirror box full of pollen, dust and sand, it would have happened in Vermont that one summer, or maybe on the coast of Maine, or those lavender fields I visited in France last year. . . . but it didn't.
08-15-2012, 10:10 PM   #42
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ryan Trevisol Quote
And of course I wouldn't use the blower on the hind end of a zoom lens. Where did I say that?
You didn't. He added his own thought.
08-16-2012, 12:49 AM   #43
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ryan Trevisol Quote
You seem to have missed the part right before the part you quoted:

My definition of a sheltered area is off the street, away from dirt, sand, etc. If I have to change lenses outside or, worse, at the beach or other dusty environment, of course I would never use a rocket blower. Ducking into a shop (not a book shop) and changing the lens over a counter or my sling bag is about as controlled an environment as I could expect at home, and if I had previously been in a dusty environment, I would use the rocket blower on the outside first, then move away from the cloud of dust and change the lens, again using the rocket blower.
And of course I wouldn't use the blower on the hind end of a zoom lens. Where did I say that?
Again, I appreciate your concern but as I mentioned I used the K-x for 2+ years and I got two specs of dust on the sensor after the 2 year mark. If my method were prone to blowing my mirror box full of pollen, dust and sand, it would have happened in Vermont that one summer, or maybe on the coast of Maine, or those lavender fields I visited in France last year. . . . but it didn't.
Hi

Sorry you felt misquoted, I had no intention of querying your prowess. My view of the matter was to simply add another point and I accept I could have expressed myself better. Knowing that some forum members can be very touchy interpreting responses I should have taken greater care.

I should have prefaced the quote: "...using a rocket blower before mounting the new lens" with "When changing lenses outside on location..."

As I said it was only an additional point I wanted to make. And since my comment would most likely only be valid in regard to zoom lenses I felt it needed to be said.

There is another point I would like to make though. And in case you feel the following observation is angled at you, let me make it clear it is not. It is only for general consumption.

A lot of folk take lens changing much too serious in my view. When out on location and a situation presents itself which requires quick action it is of no use to seek out a safe place to change a lens if this photo opportunity requires different glass. One needs to act quickly. Since a few specs of dirt on the sensor is no big deal it is better to get the shot and deal with the crap on the sensor later. With software these days it is so easy to remove them from the image.

And I say it again, dirt on a sensor just acquired on the day during a shoot is so easily removed at night when you get home. There will be absolutely no harm done to the sensor, the little buggers are infinitely tougher than you think. Unlike in the old film days digital has brought the dust problem to the fore and it will forever be a problem and it is of no use to get uptight or paranoid about it.

Camera manufacturers know about sensor dust and that the removal of it is a user serviceable activity. One should not forget that camera service centres also only use real people when they get cams handed in for cleaning, they may or may not be properly trained but at the lowest level of competency they will be at least (and often worse) as competent as the customer is. It would be next to impossible to sell a camera if it becomes known that its sensor easily damaged during cleaning.

Hoping all is well - Greetings
08-16-2012, 01:39 AM   #44
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Time for a wet sensor clean I think! (it's actually quite easy to do)
08-16-2012, 02:30 AM   #45
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ryan Trevisol Quote
You seem to have missed the part right before the part you quoted:

My definition of a sheltered area is off the street, away from dirt, sand, etc. If I have to change lenses outside or, worse, at the beach or other dusty environment, of course I would never use a rocket blower. Ducking into a shop (not a book shop) and changing the lens over a counter or my sling bag is about as controlled an environment as I could expect at home, and if I had previously been in a dusty environment, I would use the rocket blower on the outside first, then move away from the cloud of dust and change the lens, again using the rocket blower.
And of course I wouldn't use the blower on the hind end of a zoom lens. Where did I say that?
Again, I appreciate your concern but as I mentioned I used the K-x for 2+ years and I got two specs of dust on the sensor after the 2 year mark. If my method were prone to blowing my mirror box full of pollen, dust and sand, it would have happened in Vermont that one summer, or maybe on the coast of Maine, or those lavender fields I visited in France last year. . . . but it didn't.
Hi

Sorry you felt misquoted, I had no intention of querying your prowess. My view of the matter was to simply add another point and I accept I could have expressed myself better. Knowing that some forum members can be very touchy interpreting responses I should have taken greater care.

I should have prefaced the quote: "...using a rocket blower before mounting the new lens" with "When changing lenses outside on location..."

As I said it was only an additional point I wanted to make. And since my comment would most likely only be valid in regard to zoom lenses I felt it needed to be said.

There is another point I would like to make though. And in case you feel the following observation is angled at you, let me make it clear it is not. It is only for general consumption.

A lot of folk take lens changing much too serious in my view. When out on location and a situation presents itself which requires quick action it is of no use to seek out a safe place to change a lens if this photo opportunity requires different glass. One needs to act quickly. Since a few specs of dirt on the sensor is no big deal it is better to get the shot and deal with the crap on the sensor later. With software these days it is so easy to remove them from the image.

And I say it again, dirt on a sensor just acquired on the day during a shoot is so easily removed at night when you get home. There will be absolutely no harm done to the sensor, the little buggers are infinitely tougher than you think. Unlike in the old film days digital has brought the dust problem to the fore and it will forever be a problem and it is of no use to get uptight or paranoid about it.

Camera manufacturers know about sensor dust and that the removal of it is a user serviceable activity. One should not forget that camera service centres also only use real people when they get cams handed in for cleaning, they may or may not be properly trained but at the lowest level of competency they will be at least (and often worse) as competent as the customer is. It would be next to impossible to sell a camera if it becomes known that its sensor easily damaged during cleaning.

Hoping all is well - Greetings
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