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08-05-2012, 08:28 AM - 1 Like   #1
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Using jpegs on the K5

Started my DSLR career with a K100d, moved up to a K20d and now own a K5.

I have always used Raw for personal photos and most of the paid work as well. However, I have to admit that doing Raw work late into the night to meet deadlines
lost its appeal a long time ago.

With my K5 I have spent time trying to get 'good' jpegs straight out of the camera. These shots are all straight from the camera after re-sizing. I have gone for a very slightly saturated look, all shots taken indoors (it happens to be a wet day). I will post outdoor shots as soon as possible.

If this set up works OK, the amount of PP work will be greatly reduced and I will be able to spend more time taking pictures. Ah - bliss.

Settings :-
Natural
Saturation +2
High/Low key +2
Contrast +3
Sharpness +3

Highlight Correction - On
Shadow Correction - Low

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Last edited by Richard Spencer; 08-05-2012 at 08:34 AM.
08-05-2012, 05:49 PM   #2
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Yes it is a time consuming thing to do converting RAW to the way you like your image.with the K5 I mostly keep it on RAW + jpeg mode to get the best of both worlds.At least that way if you have a really good shot that even when adjusted like you have in the camera,you can still adjust it if need to on your computer.
08-06-2012, 11:01 AM   #3
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That makes a lot of sense Barnster. For a long time I have used Silkypix but am now also looking at LR4.
08-15-2012, 05:36 PM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by Richard Spencer Quote
Started my DSLR career with a K100d, moved up to a K20d and now own a K5.

I have always used Raw for personal photos and most of the paid work as well. However, I have to admit that doing Raw work late into the night to meet deadlines
lost its appeal a long time ago.

With my K5 I have spent time trying to get 'good' jpegs straight out of the camera. These shots are all straight from the camera after re-sizing. I have gone for a very slightly saturated look, all shots taken indoors (it happens to be a wet day). I will post outdoor shots as soon as possible.

If this set up works OK, the amount of PP work will be greatly reduced and I will be able to spend more time taking pictures. Ah - bliss.

Settings :-
Natural
Saturation +2
High/Low key +2
Contrast +3
Sharpness +3

Highlight Correction - On
Shadow Correction - Low
I have my K-5 settings pretty close to yours. I'm not in the RAW camp...I shoot JPEG and try my best to get my exposures on target....if exposure is meaningfully off, then it's not a keeper (not trying to ignite the RAW/JPEG debate). I think the JPEGs coming out of the K-5 with similar settings to yours can be excellent photographs that can stand up to anything processed from RAW that aims to render an image that is creatively faithful to the what was in front of the lens. If you want to make an oil painting out of your shot, well, you need to shoot raw. Shadows...we'll they are part of the world I photograph and I want them, exposed as best I can. If something is properly in the shadows in my exposure, I'm not interesting in pulling anything of it. I don't like sitting at my computer doing PP, I like getting my exposures correct and having my camera set up to get the best creatively exposed image I can at the time at my skill level. I use Picasa to tweak my JPEGs and any other adjustments are in-camera. Frankly, software any more complex than Picasa makes my head spin and keeps me from getting out and shooting so I can increase the number of good exposures I get with the K-5 alone. Just my 2 cents. Everyone is entitled to shoot and process how they please....this is art and everyone does it their on way....it's what keeps the world interesting.

08-15-2012, 05:41 PM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by Richard Spencer Quote
That makes a lot of sense Barnster. For a long time I have used Silkypix but am now also looking at LR4.
Can you explain how to use Pentax DCU4 (which as I understand it is a watered down version of Silkypix...I may be wrong). I can't get anything done with it. I use Picasa, but if DCU4 can be "made accessible to me " I think I'd prefer it because it is designed to be used with the K-5. Any advice would be appreciated.
08-15-2012, 05:47 PM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by Richard Spencer Quote
Started my DSLR career with a K100d, moved up to a K20d and now own a K5.

Highlight Correction - On
Shadow Correction - Low
I've tried Highlight Correction several times and each time it seems give me a very bright image. Frankly, I'm not sure what it is supposed to do. Do you know? I mean, I know the manual says it's supposed to increase the dynamic range of the sensor...I think that probably alot of fluff. When I shot Nikon (for a veeerrry short time) it had "D-Light" setting which was supposed to act sort of like a fill light correction.

I've tried Shadow Correction on all levels and currently have it on low. Again, I'm not seeing anything dramatic so again, I'm not 100% sure what it's supposed to do. Do you know?

Presumably both of these settings aim to correct exposure, so I'm not sure if you need to use them if your exposure is pretty close to spot on.???
08-15-2012, 06:20 PM   #7
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I also use RAW + JPEG to allow me to edit the really good ones, but still have some nice ones without the effort.

After some experimentation, my settings are...
Natural
Saturation +2
High/Low key +0
Contrast +1
Fine Sharpness +3

Highlight Correction - On
Shadow Correction - Low

I recently started using Lightroom 4, and once I work out some profiles similar to what I'm using, I just might skip the JPG altogether and shoot RAW only (to save on disk space).
08-16-2012, 02:02 AM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by CMG Quote
I've tried Shadow Correction on all levels and currently have it on low. Again, I'm not seeing anything dramatic so again, I'm not 100% sure what it's supposed to do. Do you know?
Shadow protection brightens the dark parts of your image. You can use it selectively from shot to shot to cope with high-contrast scenes where you feel the finished image would benefit from "lifted shadows", typically backlit shots like windows etc.

This one was taken with shadow correction on max and b&w contrast 0. This shot really benefitted
from lifted shadows because the scene is so contrasty, I needed to rein the contrast in.

IMHO, you shouldn't leave it on as a fixed setting for general shooting. Unless you like it that way of course.
Normal-contrast scenes like indoors or overcast don't usually benefit from highlight or shadow correction.

Regards,
--Anders.

08-16-2012, 05:37 AM   #9
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Everyone is entitled to shoot and process how they please..

Hi CMG, I agree totally withthis comment. However, there is no doubt that RAW well done is still the better route to go. Only since I bought a K5 and started really looking at its jpegs have I have started using RAW less because there is so much scope within the camera.
08-16-2012, 07:41 AM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by Richard Spencer Quote
Everyone is entitled to shoot and process how they please..

Hi CMG, I agree totally withthis comment. However, there is no doubt that RAW well done is still the better route to go. Only since I bought a K5 and started really looking at its jpegs have I have started using RAW less because there is so much scope within the camera.
I think RAW done well requires a certain skill set and JPEG done well requires another skill set. There surely is some overlap. So I don't know if I would agree the "Raw well done is still the better route to go." I think it may be the better route for some, but not for others. I think it's great that you are getting great results using your K-5!
08-16-2012, 07:42 AM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by asp1880 Quote
Shadow protection brightens the dark parts of your image. You can use it selectively from shot to shot to cope with high-contrast scenes where you feel the finished image would benefit from "lifted shadows", typically backlit shots like windows etc.

This one was taken with shadow correction on max and b&w contrast 0. This shot really benefitted
from lifted shadows because the scene is so contrasty, I needed to rein the contrast in.

IMHO, you shouldn't leave it on as a fixed setting for general shooting. Unless you like it that way of course.
Normal-contrast scenes like indoors or overcast don't usually benefit from highlight or shadow correction.

Regards,
--Anders.
Thanks Anders! Good explanation and advice. Nice photo!!
08-16-2012, 07:45 AM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by asp1880 Quote

This one was taken with shadow correction on max and b&w contrast 0.
Anders - did you convert to monochrome in-camera or did you PP w/ software?
08-24-2012, 02:38 AM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by CMG Quote
Anders - did you convert to monochrome in-camera or did you PP w/ software?
Let's say I did "in-camera PP"

I chose monochrome before the shot, used +2 EC and spot metered on the brightest clouds, pressed AE-L, recomposed, took the shot.

On review, I noticed the overly dark parts on the histogram and in the yellow blinkies.

Then I set shadow protection to max, went into custom image, fiddled with contrast and high/low key to see the effect. I ended up reducing contrast from my usual +3 to 0 and pressed AE-L to redevelop the shot with the new settings. Reviewed again and was satisfied with both highlights and shadows.

You can also press AE-L when reviewing the latest shot (latest shot only, and only before power off) to capture the raw file and mess with it at home. I also do that sometimes but I'm not good enough at the computer to improve upon what I can do with "in-camera PP".

Regards,
--Anders.
08-24-2012, 03:36 AM   #14
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There is certainly nothing wrong with shooting in JPG these days. When I first started using digital, I used the Olympus E1, with only 5 million pixels. I was thus forced to shoot in RAW for everything. My next camera was the Fuji S5 pro. Still only 6 million pixels, but it produced fantastic JPGs. Then I bought the 12 million pixel Nikon D300. A camera that blew everyone away, at the time. This gave me better JPGs than the others could produce in RAW. I still have and use the D300 but now I also have a K5 too. It boils down to, I need to shoot in RAW with the D300 to match the quality of a JPG from the K5. Its a case of... How much quality is enough ! People often forget you can edit a JPG the same as a raw file. A RAW file will just give you more headroom for correction in most areas. How often do you need that much correction ! Lets not forget also... A raw is useless on its own. It itself will end up as a JPG ! There are a lot of plus points for shooting in JPG too. Faster frame rate ( or more of ) Less space etc, Auto corrections etc etc etc I shoot in RAW for 95% of the time despite all of this. A lot is because I work as a pro though. I think if i were not a pro then I would be shooting JPGs. Except for those times when experience tells you, that your looking at a complex scene etc.
Gary
08-24-2012, 10:33 AM   #15
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So are you saying that the K-5 in-camera JPEG rendering is excellent buy when you as a pro are shotting say a wedding and you really need to focus on getting a ton of shots for your client to choose from, and since lighting may be all over the map on the job, not to mention the overall stress, that in those situations shooting raw gives you enough correction flexibility to ensure that you almost always deliver "The Shot". But, if you have time to contemplate every shot and set up your K-5 that JPEG is the way to go given the K-5 processing capabilities? It's interesting to hear the rare unbiased pro's point of view (compliment ).
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