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12-30-2012, 01:26 PM   #16
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I dislike the shadow it casts of some lenses in the lower part of a picture..
If there were a way to raise it a little higher that problem would be solved.

Any suggestions?

Mickey

12-30-2012, 01:36 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by mickeyobe Quote
I dislike the shadow it casts of some lenses in the lower part of a picture..
If there were a way to raise it a little higher that problem would be solved.

Any suggestions?

Mickey
In most (but not all) cases, this is due to the lens hood. Remove the lens hood and the shadow problem is fixed.

It's also more of a problem with longer lenses than with shorter.
12-30-2012, 01:43 PM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by tabl10s Quote
that no-one likes? The output can be dialed down and it's much easier to use than my Metz 58AF-2.
The onboard flash is a small, low-angle, on-axis light source. As such, it results in hard shadows with unflattering shadow placement. A shoe mount flash is superior in that the light source is larger, at a higher angle, and can be tilted (and sometimes swiveled) to bounce light. Better yet, a shoe mount flash can be used off camera with modifiers such as umbrellas, soft boxes, beauty dishes, etc.

This is not to say the onboard flash is useless, it can be used in certain situations as a fill light, but is not really up to the task of serving as a main light.

Last edited by MPrince; 12-30-2012 at 01:50 PM.
12-30-2012, 01:47 PM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by rbefly Quote
...
But there are some options, without spending $500 (or even $400) on a Metz, Pentax 540, Sigma or other high-end flash.
For about $50.00 USD, you can pick up a used Pentax AF280T with tilt and swivel.
A Pentax AF 200fg is around $100-$130-no tilt or swivel. To fix that, a dedicated hotshoe cable (mine is a Vivitar FC-Pen, costs $30.00, works fine) allows you to put the light anywhere you want it within arm's length.
For $120-$150 used, a Pentax AF360fgz provides tilt but no swivel, rear-curtain sync, modelling light and other features. New, about $240.
The Chinese knock-offs have tilt and swivel (but are fully manual) for around $100.
Most of these would take up about the same room in your camera bag as another lens. For less than $200, you've greatly increased your options.
Ron
It turns out I'm not a flash man. I had a 540AF that no doubt has many advantages for those that need it. I down-graded to a Bower SFD290 that bounces, swivels and manually zooms, has 2 auto f-stops and manual, and cost $39.99. I use it about twice a year :-)

12-30-2012, 01:49 PM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by GibbyTheMole Quote


Generally speaking, the bigger the light source, the better off you are.
I don't really agree with this statement. It's more accurate to say the bigger the light source the softer the light (and the softer the shadows). A small light source results in hard light/hard shadows. There is nothing inherently bad about hard light, it can give you the effect you want.
12-30-2012, 02:22 PM   #21
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Lighting is a creative realm of photography.
Pros use all sorts of lights to create the effect they want - bare source light, diffused panel lighting, snooted lights, gobos.
It's not that small lights are unappealing overall, it's more the effect of bare axial lighting sources.
12-30-2012, 08:57 PM   #22
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There are actually some commercial pop up flash modifiers that are pretty creative in their designs.

The Graslon Spark fits over the pop up, reflects the flash back to a larger reflector, then diffuses that light to make the flash considerably softer.

Spark Pop-up Flash Diffuser

The Demb Pop up Flip-it reflects the flash upward to bounce off of the ceiling, and has an adjustable angle bounce card in back of the flash head to direct however much light you want forward or not as you choose.

Demb Flash Products - Demb Pop-up Flip-it! Flash Reflector

I like the Demb -- it fits in a pocket so I can have it with me at all times -- I found a little case that can carry a spare battery, memory card, and the Pop up Flip-it, so I just slip that into a pocket when I grab the camera. It's my all around photo safety net.

With the ability to use higher ISO without too much penalty, smaller flash guns with less power become more useful in more situations, and it doesn't get smaller or more convenient than the pop up if you can modify the light from it to be more pleasing. I'm using it and a very compact Metz 24 AF1 a lot more and leaving the big AF 540 FGZ home most days with the K-5 and K-5 IIs, but I'm more inclined towards less advanced use of flash than many.

Scott
12-30-2012, 10:41 PM   #23
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well for starters the built in flash is small - the smaller the light source is the harder the shadows are, while it is true small light sources are favourable for jewellery and food photography you need very large light sources to photograph people and larger subjects - like cars. There is also the fact that you can be more creative with a wireless flash than you can be with a built in one, because you can change its position and reveal interesting things about the subject:



12-31-2012, 03:38 AM   #24
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My point exactly Digitalis. See subjects come to life with 3D effects in photos with off-axis lighting.
06-28-2013, 11:44 PM   #25
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Thank you everyone.

So many options to weigh.

I have some excellent flashes that were used with previous cameras.
Canon 300 TL I know this is safe for my K-5 but how to use it is still a puzzle. I'll have to study the manual some more and make some test shots I guess.

Vivitar 5600 with Canon T90 dedicated module. I don't know trigger voltage of this flash or if Canon module will work with K-5 or if modules are still available that will work with the K-5. Otherwise - "I'll have to study the manual some more and make some test shots I guess and make some test shots I guess."

Mickey
06-29-2013, 05:18 AM   #26
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Pentax DSLRs are exceedingly good at low-light photography and so don't need much in the way of flash lighting. Sure, one can complain the built-in flash provides harsh lighting but if you combine that flash with the camera's low-light capability you can achieve the opposite -- using the built-in flash to soften otherwise harsh ambient light. It works very well in this capacity if you dial down the FEC.
06-29-2013, 11:14 AM   #27
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The built in light of the K-5 would be iseal for most of my flash pictures if it weren't for that destructive lens shadow in many of them.



Mickey
06-29-2013, 11:41 AM   #28
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That shadow is either the lens hood or the lens barrel itself. If it's the lens hood, remove it. If it's the lens barrel, use a lens with a shorter barrel.
06-29-2013, 12:00 PM   #29
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I believe the camera manual lists the zooms that throw a shadow with a particular body. Not all do. I think you don't see a shadow with the kit lens or 18-250, even with the hood mounted.
06-29-2013, 12:30 PM   #30
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QuoteOriginally posted by audiobomber Quote
I believe the camera manual lists the zooms that throw a shadow with a particular body. Not all do. I think you don't see a shadow with the kit lens or 18-250, even with the hood mounted.
And for each zoom lens that may be impacted, it's dependent on the focal length the lens is set to.
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