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12-01-2014, 12:55 PM   #1
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Metering on the K-5 II(s) - How accurate is it?

I shoot exclusively in spot, and I'm very curious about this specific point in the K-5 II(s). I understand if this has been asked before, and would thank you in advance for some links.
Thank you.

Kind regards.

Paul

12-01-2014, 01:05 PM   #2
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Most Pentax cameras tend to shoot a little underexposed. On k-5IIs I run exposure comp @ +1/3 or +2/3 but that is with center weighted. I would think spot would be about the same. However, different lenses, particularly older ones will take a different setting, sometimes a little more, sometimes a little less.
12-01-2014, 01:54 PM   #3
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I don't mean any of the camera's automatic exposure settings. I "trust" the look my images will get, by carefully expose to the highlights. I mean, how good are the Pentax protecting the highlights? I don't mind deep shadows, so I'm more interested in the other part of the spectrum, so to speak.
12-01-2014, 02:16 PM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by Flugelbinder Quote
I "trust" the look my images will get, by carefully expose to the highlights. I mean, how good are the Pentax protecting the highlights?
That is different than your original question.

Since you are shooting spot exclusively, I guess it is safe to assume that your intent is to place exposure for a given element of the subject. What I would suggest with any camera is that you simply give it a try and if you are not happy, do some testing against an evenly-lit white surface. If the metered value cannot allow for additional four stops exposure without clipping, -1 exposure compensation would be indicated as general practice. The K-5IIs also supports auto highlight correction, but if that is activated, you will lose some degree of fine control.


Steve

12-01-2014, 03:12 PM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
That is different than your original question.

...The K-5IIs also supports auto highlight correction, but if that is activated, you will lose some degree of fine control.


Steve

I read something about this, but if I remember correctly, I had a slight preference for the Shadow control, I believe...

---------- Post added 12-01-14 at 03:12 PM ----------

Like you said, nothing like trying it out...
12-01-2014, 04:08 PM   #6
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The metering on my K-5 II is very accurate. I synched it to the focusing point and use Select AF so it's on the spot almost every time, except for very dark objects like a Black cat or Snow, then I got to compensate a little.
12-01-2014, 04:33 PM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by hjoseph7 Quote
The metering on my K-5 II is very accurate. I synched it to the focusing point and use Select AF so it's on the spot almost every time, except for very dark objects like a Black cat or Snow, then I got to compensate a little.
Thank you.

---------- Post added 12-01-14 at 04:46 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
That is different than your original question.

Since you are shooting spot exclusively, I guess it is safe to assume that your intent is to place exposure for a given element of the subject. What I would suggest with any camera is that you simply give it a try and if you are not happy, do some testing against an evenly-lit white surface. If the metered value cannot allow for additional four stops exposure without clipping, -1 exposure compensation would be indicated as general practice. The K-5IIs also supports auto highlight correction, but if that is activated, you will lose some degree of fine control.


Steve
Thank you.
12-01-2014, 10:47 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by Flugelbinder Quote
I read something about this, but if I remember correctly, I had a slight preference for the Shadow control, I believe...
JPEG only for that feature.


Steve

12-02-2014, 12:36 AM   #9
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I photograph a lot of industrial stuff vehicles and the like which are large blocks of solid colour and evenly lit on the whole. I have found that using spot can be very unpredictable especially when well lit.

My experience is that using spot to lift shadow areas works well but using spot to set the exposure for high lights is not always so successful
12-02-2014, 01:07 AM - 1 Like   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by Flugelbinder Quote
I shoot exclusively in spot, and I'm very curious about this specific point in the K-5 II(s). I understand if this has been asked before, and would thank you in advance for some links. Thank you. Kind regards. Paul
On my K5IIs bodies, K-5 and past K20's, I use manual exposure and mostly due to theater, quit using in camera meters. I do carry a little Digisix for incident readings and have a flash meter to speed up studio stuff but understanding Sunny 16 as an anchor point and adjusting with the histogram works well for me. I record DNGs and tend to underexpose a bit, the DR latitude allows it. If my cameras meters didn't work, I'd never know it. Everything on my web sites and blog was done this way. The histogram is the modern Polaroid and I think, a gift from the photography gods.

12-02-2014, 02:53 AM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by Brooke Meyer Quote
On my K5IIs bodies, K-5 and past K20's, I use manual exposure and mostly due to theater, quit using in camera meters. I do carry a little Digisix for incident readings and have a flash meter to speed up studio stuff but understanding Sunny 16 as an anchor point and adjusting with the histogram works well for me. I record DNGs and tend to underexpose a bit, the DR latitude allows it. If my cameras meters didn't work, I'd never know it. Everything on my web sites and blog was done this way. The histogram is the modern Polaroid and I think, a gift from the photography gods.
Thank you. This is exactly what I needed to see.
12-02-2014, 04:39 AM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by Brooke Meyer Quote
On my K5IIs bodies, K-5 and past K20's, I use manual exposure and mostly due to theater, quit using in camera meters. I do carry a little Digisix for incident readings and have a flash meter to speed up studio stuff but understanding Sunny 16 as an anchor point and adjusting with the histogram works well for me. I record DNGs and tend to underexpose a bit, the DR latitude allows it. If my cameras meters didn't work, I'd never know it. Everything on my web sites and blog was done this way. The histogram is the modern Polaroid and I think, a gift from the photography gods.
The more I look at this the more I want one...


---------- Post added 12-02-14 at 04:46 AM ----------

I don't use the histogram as much as I use the "needle", or the in-camera meter. I have a fairly good understanding of the Sunny 16, and it's an automation already in my "photographer-self", so to speak. I was very interested in see (like you so elegantly yet categorically show in your example) the true dynamic range of this camera.
Thank you again for the last push.
12-02-2014, 01:59 PM   #13
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I'm curious about why you shoot exclusively in spot?

Spot only meters probably 3% of the scene. In normal use of the camera, that 3% reading is rarely likely to match any other area of the scene. So unless just 3% of the scene is all you want to meter, spot mode seems the least likely to deliver you an accurate exposure most of the time.

The different metering modes (matrix, centre-weighted, spot) are there to suit different lighting scenarios and issues. I can understand using spot to solve specific lighting problems, but using it 100% of the time seems like a recipe for lots of exposure problems.
12-02-2014, 05:13 PM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by rawr Quote
I'm curious about why you shoot exclusively in spot?

...just 3% of the scene is all you want to meter, spot mode seems the least likely to deliver you an accurate exposure most of the time.

...but using it 100% of the time seems like a recipe for lots of exposure problems.
I find that works for me, and for what I'm looking for in my images.
Most people, when looking at DXO (and other) numbers and reviews look at how good the camera is protecting the highlights - due mostly to a notion commonly known as "ETTR". I was "taught" differently, or have learnt differently. I was taught to expose for the highlights and have encountered little complications, or situations where I would require more than the built-in meter (exposure "needle"). Even when adding artificial light, the "concept" - expose to the highlights - is still valid, if you think about it...
12-02-2014, 05:46 PM   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by Flugelbinder Quote
mostly to a notion commonly known as "ETTR". I was "taught" differently, or have learnt differently. I was taught to expose for the highlights and have encountered little complications, or situations where I would require more than the built-in meter (exposure "needle"). Even when adding artificial light, the "concept" - expose to the highlights
ETTR is 'expose to the highlights'. That's the whole point of it. Expose as far right on the histogram as possible without going over and losing any highlights. It has nothing to do with 'protecting' the highlights. In fact a good ETTR image will lose just a bit of highlight in areas that are pure white, such as the brightest part of a cloud.

Essentially the same as you are doing with a spot meter but by using the histogram. Not something possible with film but on digital it is far quicker to take a test shot and adjust than anything else. Just take a test shot and adjust so pure white IS pure white and you are done.
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