Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
08-01-2016, 05:06 AM   #1
New Member
mick2444's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: oswestry shropshire uk
Posts: 17
k5iis looks a bit too much for technophobe

hi, i have read the forum for a couple of weeks and decided to buy the k5iis and 18 x 135 lens. it is being delivered today. i have down loaded the manual and been reading it all morning. it might as well have been in chinese. it will be my first proper camera, looking at the manual i think i might have over estimated my brain power.there is menus within menus within .menus. does everything have to be set up? or is there a button for point and shoot? if not it will be put in a display cabinet because its one nice looking camera ha ha , any advice when i take it out of the box? thanks mike.


Last edited by mick2444; 08-01-2016 at 05:18 AM.
08-01-2016, 05:37 AM - 2 Likes   #2
Loyal Site Supporter
TER-OR's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Dundee, IL
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 5,685
Green mode is your "point and shoot." That's where the camera makes all the decisions.

Most of the time for general use I use TAv mode. Front wheel is shutter speed, rear wheel is aperture. Set your aperture to a specific value - your 18-135 will be good around f8ish. Then adjust the shutter speed to keep the ISO in a comfortable range. Generally that's below ISO 6400, but the lower the better. So you can trade off shutter speed and aperture to achieve what you want. Remember that shutter speed compensates for motion, but sometimes you want a bit of motion blur.

You'll learn as you shoot. A DSLR, particularly a flagship like yours, will rely on the user to take more control and gives the user the tools. You don't need to dig into menus very often, though there are some recommended initial settings you can find. I'd keep the color set to Neutral for your JPGs, if you're not shooting RAW.
08-01-2016, 05:42 AM - 1 Like   #3
Site Supporter




Join Date: May 2015
Location: Hampshire
Photos: Albums
Posts: 381
QuoteOriginally posted by mick2444 Quote
hi, i have read the forum for a couple of weeks and decided to buy the k5iis and 18 x 135 lens. it is being delivered today. i have down loaded the manual and been reading it all morning. it might as well have been in chinese. it will be my first proper camera, looking at the manual i think i might have over estimated my brain power.there is menus within menus within .menus. does everything have to be set up? or is there a button for point and shoot? if not it will be put in a display cabinet because its one nice looking camera ha ha , any advice when i take it out of the box? thanks mike.

You are going to need to read some of the manual to get started and have the camera battery charged, strap fitted, lens fitted etc. One thing you do not want to do is damage some part of it before you get going. Try and identify the exterior buttons and controls and their function.


There are point and shoot options on the dial to the left of the camera's flash housing, (I imagine the K-5iis parts are the same as my K-5), that has a green rectangle and the letter P, either can be aligned with the white line on the flash housing for point and shoot. To align this you need to depress the button in the centre of the dial while turning it.


I have some previous experience with SLRs going back years so am familiar with shutter and aperture priorities, compensation etc but am yet to use my K-5 to it's full abilities or read and understand the manual fully regarding what more I might use. There is a lot to learn! If you can get hold of someone with a bit of experience with SLRs, have their input as you go along so your understanding of the manual and terms it uses will be helped.
Most importantly maybe is to enjoy your purchase and it's abilities to take great images.
08-01-2016, 05:44 AM   #4
New Member
mick2444's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: oswestry shropshire uk
Posts: 17
Original Poster
thanks, that will help me a lot,the manual overwhelmed me and gave me an oh sh@t what have i bought moment, mike

08-01-2016, 05:45 AM - 1 Like   #5
Site Supporter
k0og's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Rolla, Missouri
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 646
Mick,

Congratulations on your new acquisition!

To get started, you can put the dial on "P" mode, make sure the AF switch is set to "AFS" and start pointing & shooting.

Once you get a little bit of a feel for it, don't hesitate to try other modes.

My suggestion: Learn the basics by going to "M" mode (fully manual) and experiment with setting the f-stop (aperture), shutter speed, at a fixed ISO. There are untold numbers of web sites and books that cover the basics of exposure (aperture/shutter speed/ISO), but you might start with the article on exposure basics here at the PF site.

Post some of your first photographs when you get your new equipment.

-Joe-
08-01-2016, 05:55 AM   #6
New Member
mick2444's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: oswestry shropshire uk
Posts: 17
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by k0og Quote
Mick,

Congratulations on your new acquisition!

To get started, you can put the dial on "P" mode, make sure the AF switch is set to "AFS" and start pointing & shooting.

Once you get a little bit of a feel for it, don't hesitate to try other modes.

My suggestion: Learn the basics by going to "M" mode (fully manual) and experiment with setting the f-stop (aperture), shutter speed, at a fixed ISO. There are untold numbers of web sites and books that cover the basics of exposure (aperture/shutter speed/ISO), but you might start with the article on exposure basics here at the PF site.

Post some of your first photographs when you get your new equipment.

-Joe-
thanks joe i will post some pictures,mike
08-01-2016, 06:03 AM - 1 Like   #7
Senior Member
johnhilvert's Avatar

Join Date: May 2015
Location: Canberra, ACT
Posts: 173
QuoteOriginally posted by mick2444 Quote
hi, i have read the forum for a couple of weeks and decided to buy the k5iis and 18 x 135 lens. it is being delivered today. i have down loaded the manual and been reading it all morning. it might as well have been in chinese. it will be my first proper camera, looking at the manual i think i might have over estimated my brain power.there is menus within menus within .menus. does everything have to be set up? or is there a button for point and shoot? if not it will be put in a display cabinet because its one nice looking camera ha ha , any advice when i take it out of the box? thanks mike.
Hang in there @mick2444. The Pentax interface is one of the most accessible around. Its manual is important as a reference but it won't set out how to take your pictures, though.

That said, your point and shoot (auto) mode is available as the little green rectangle on the left dial.

Stick with that and you can take a few dozen images in that mode without too many worries.

Don't be overly concerned with the menus as default settings will be OK at the start anyway.

As you get more comfortable, perhaps check the review of the the initial version of the K5 at Pentax K-5 Review - Introduction | PentaxForums.com Reviews for an overview of its core features and an easy intro to its menu structure. A guide to recommended settings can be found at Pentax K-5 Review - Walkthrough | PentaxForums.com Reviews

But the main thing is take lots of photos and learn what works for you. Get back to this forum with more specific questions after that.
08-01-2016, 06:13 AM - 1 Like   #8
Pentaxian




Join Date: Feb 2010
Photos: Albums
Posts: 1,389
QuoteOriginally posted by mick2444 Quote
it will be my first proper camera,
an 'improper' camera decides how the camera will work, a 'proper' camera gives the user the chance to make some decisions him/herself. I've been using various Pentax DSLRs for ten years and still have no idea what most of the menus do

Just put the camera in P mode and practice and you will find it's not as difficult or daunting as you might imagine,

08-01-2016, 06:22 AM - 1 Like   #9
Loyal Site Supporter
Bruce Clark's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Brookfield, Victoria
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 3,764
Welcome to the forum and to the K5 IIs world.

Yes it can be a bit daunting but everybody starts somewhere. As you have already noticed there are plenty of folk in this forum willing to help on any topic, so that is my tip of the day.
  • Don't be afraid to ask.
  • Second tip is to scroll through some of the photos posted on the forum pages and look for someone who makes images you like, be it portraiture, still life, machinery, landscape, sport, whatever and try to work out how they achieved a certain effect.
  • Third tip, post photos in the critique section. You will get honest opinions here, unlike some other websites.
All the best with your new toy.
08-01-2016, 06:33 AM   #10
New Member
mick2444's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: oswestry shropshire uk
Posts: 17
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by Bruce Clark Quote
Welcome to the forum and to the K5 IIs world.

Yes it can be a bit daunting but everybody starts somewhere. As you have already noticed there are plenty of folk in this forum willing to help on any topic, so that is my tip of the day.
  • Don't be afraid to ask.
  • Second tip is to scroll through some of the photos posted on the forum pages and look for someone who makes images you like, be it portraiture, still life, machinery, landscape, sport, whatever and try to work out how they achieved a certain effect.
  • Third tip, post photos in the critique section. You will get honest opinions here, unlike some other websites.
All the best with your new toy.
thanks bruce, my main interest would be landscape shots, i live in the hills on the welsh english border and cycle a lot the scenery is stunning rarely see another person, would a landscape photo need a tripod? or just rest the camera on the bike seat stone wall, fence etc mike

Last edited by mick2444; 08-01-2016 at 06:46 AM.
08-01-2016, 06:35 AM - 1 Like   #11
Loyal Site Supporter
Rupert's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Texas
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 24,534
In a few weeks at most you will be looking back and thinking..."it really was easy".

The K5IIs is a wonderful camera, you will be amazed at what it can do. Easy to use once you learn a few very simple basics, and outstanding performance!

Best Regards!.....Help is always handy here at PForums if you need it! Don't hesitate to ask if you do!
08-01-2016, 07:10 AM - 1 Like   #12
Pentaxian
traderdrew's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Florida
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 570
QuoteOriginally posted by mick2444 Quote
thanks bruce, my main interest would be landscape shots, i live in the hills on the welsh english border and cycle a lot the scenery is stunning rarely see another person, would a landscape photo need a tripod? or just rest the camera on the bike seat stone wall, fence etc mike
You can probably get away with good photos without a tripod with your SR on. Learn about depth of field first. DOF is directly related to the lens you use. The aperture of the lens directly effects your DOF.

I've photographed seascapes just before sunrise. A tripod is essential for this because the light was so low. Once the sun came up, I didn't need my tripod.

Learn about aperture, shutter speed, ISO, and last but certainly not least, exposure in that order is the way I would teach it.
08-01-2016, 07:12 AM   #13
New Member
mick2444's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: oswestry shropshire uk
Posts: 17
Original Poster
well i just tracked the parcel, it came from america that was quick.placed the order thursday. it has been delivered to my neibour 1/2 a mile away i live off the beaten track so will go and pick it up now and have a play with it in the field mike.
08-01-2016, 07:19 AM - 1 Like   #14
Loyal Site Supporter
UncleVanya's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2014
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 9,750
There are very good ebooks in the marketplace that are far better than the manual.
08-01-2016, 07:19 AM   #15
New Member
mick2444's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: oswestry shropshire uk
Posts: 17
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by traderdrew Quote
You can probably get away with good photos without a tripod with your SR on. Learn about depth of field first. DOF is directly related to the lens you use. The aperture of the lens directly effects your DOF.

I've photographed seascapes just before sunrise. A tripod is essential for this because the light was so low. Once the sun came up, I didn't need my tripod.

Learn about aperture, shutter speed, ISO, and last but certainly not least, exposure in that order is the way I would teach it.
thanks, i have just orderd a book _ understanding exposure by bryan peterson
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
advice, camera, dslr, feature, k-5, k-5 ii, k-5 iis, k5, lens, menus, pentax k-5, shutter, speeds, tripod
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Nature Another person with too much money and too much time Murra54 Post Your Photos! 10 02-15-2016 09:14 PM
how much should a second hand k5iis be tovo Pentax DSLR Discussion 19 09-27-2015 10:58 AM
Much difference between 12 bit & 14 bit raw? Wingincamera Pentax K-S1 & K-S2 10 08-01-2015 12:52 PM
When is too much, too much? lbenac Pentax Film SLR Discussion 15 05-03-2009 04:49 PM
$245 too much for a *ist DS2? jct us101 Pentax DSLR Discussion 7 12-19-2008 01:42 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:52 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top