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04-06-2012, 04:50 PM   #1
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Wedding Photography

Hi

I currently have a Pentax K-R with kit Lenses, will these be good enough to shoot a wedding, my problem is im working on a budget so would be grateful of any Ideas.

Thanks

Martin

04-06-2012, 05:15 PM   #2
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Long answer: Probably not.

Short answer: No.



Do a search on here for wedding/similar posts and you will see why. Now, if you're on about shooting a wedding as in "Should I take my camera along to my friends wedding to practice taking pics?" - sure, I can't see why not. If you're talking about professionally shooting a wedding and asking for money, run away now.

Do you have a backup body? Experience? Off-camera lighting? Faster lenses for reception shooting? Good people skills? Good processing skills? Contracts? Pricing? Are you on your own or will you need an assistant? The list goes on and on.

Also, since your other post in the k-r forum is asking about camera modes/jpeg vs raw, I would steer clear for the moment. Practice, build a portfolio, and get to know your gear/lenses and then be on the look out to assist on a wedding or to be a 2nd shooter.
04-06-2012, 05:28 PM   #3
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Wedding photography

Thanks for your input, i thought that would be the case.

i am doing the wedding for my Niece in November, so plenty of time to sharpen my skills, at no cost, this is my way of building a portfolio. So i know equipment will be vital, I have a secound body which is a sony A35. I will look on forum about equipment that I require, and have being using Raw from day one and find it easy to use, and general use AP most of the time.
04-06-2012, 07:53 PM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by madaway Quote
Hi

I currently have a Pentax K-R with kit Lenses, will these be good enough to shoot a wedding, my problem is im working on a budget so would be grateful of any Ideas.
For fun? Sure. Don't promise any pictures in advance.
For pay, I'd have reservations about it, though there are a lot of users who muddle through quite successfully with the kit zooms.
More to the point, what is your experience level with photography in general, and wedding/portraiture in particular. What other skills do you bring to the table? Are you a good people person? How well do you work under pressure?
Can you herd cats?
You might be working with drunks, just be warned.
People drink at weddings.
For pay, you also want to have a plan in case something breaks.
Even if it's just to run away.
Which might be the best thing to do......

04-06-2012, 09:14 PM   #5
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There are (at least) two different aspects to this. One is, do you have the knowledge, skills and equipment to do it right? Asked and answered, above.

The second question is, is the K-r body good enough compared to the K-5 or other cameras. To this singular question, I don't see why not, provided you have good glass on it. The lens is more important than the body, and while the K-5 has some extra features and better overall quality, the difference isn't so vast (imho) that a skilled person with the right equipment couldn't use a K-r about as well for an event.

That said, from the sound of your posts above, I'd be tempted to say "don't". Or, at least don't be the only photographer of it. Chances are you would have the best outcome to hire someone with experience, and to take some shots yourself that are meaningful to you, as well.

Edit: From reading your other thread - definitely don't be the only photographer there. If you're still sorting out what the various shooting modes do (from your other thread), there is no way you can cram enough knowledge and experience to do a wedding properly in this timeframe.
04-07-2012, 12:49 AM   #6
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i have been interested in photography for about 20 years, but never had a DSLR always used bridge camera.s, Fuji mainly, but my main concern is not about being under pressure or having the right people skills, its about the right equipment, and as you said in your post The body will be good enough and get me through (fingers crossed).

thanks for the advice.
04-07-2012, 04:41 AM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by Wheatfield Quote
You might be working with drunks, just be warned.
People drink at weddings.
For pay, you also want to have a plan in case something breaks.
Even if it's just to run away.
Which might be the best thing to do......
I'm (among other things) a wedding DJ. Drunks, you say? Oh yeah... Big time. It's not all flowers and church and happy romance. Imagine dragging your expensive camera gear into the rowdiest bar in town for several hours. 'Cuz sometimes that's what it will be like. Not always... sometimes people are just lovely. But an equal amount of time, they can be total inebriated lunatics from the 7th ring of Hell. And there's no way to predict which way it will go 'til you get there.

I've DJ-ed at two weddings where the bride got into a fistfight. I've had drunks try to climb my lightstands and about knock them over. I've had near misses with people almost spilling drinks on my equipment. One incredibly drunk guy tried to pick a fight with me because I asked him politely to not hold his drink over my mixing console. I've seen more than one fistfight at a reception. I've navigated my equipment out the door at the end of the night around pools of vomit.

Once, I walked out to my van with some gear to find a barely-vertical drunk peeing on it. He had no clue even where he was. This was also at a wedding right across the street from the police station.

You might want to think about whether you really want to hang out in that environment on a regular basis.
04-07-2012, 05:08 AM   #8
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Hi there. I don't want to sound blunt, but I personally have further reservations to your idea of doing wedding photography for pay at your stage.

#1: the camera is NOT enough to get you out of trouble when it matters in a wedding. There is far more to getting the shots that sell than just the camera. The K-r is more than capable in itself. I've shot a couple of weddings with a *ist D as my backup camera and it did the job fine. It's the lenses paired with the camera that matters far more. A highly skilled photographer would struggle to get the results he/she would want out of a wedding using kit lenses.

#2: I would highly recommend building a portfolio first before doing paid work. The experience, reputation and hard copy evidence of the two in the form of a portfolio is invaluable. Get your confidence and experience working with people in this environment, getting them to feel comfortable with you leading them to your unique style of photography, and it will prove your worth.

#3: Get the right fear for the job. A K-r might do you just fine, but without a flash and the right lenses for the job even a Canon 1D won't bring home adequate results for the job at hand.

#4: Know your gear well by practicing with it and being comfortable getting the results you want with it without having to think about camera settings, posing arrangements or light setup.

#5: You should never do a paid wedding job with a single camera. Equipment fails at unexpected and least desirable times.

04-07-2012, 05:46 AM   #9
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Hi i think i have confused a few people, about the fee, this is totally free of charge, as it is for my Neice who is getting married on a budget. So to start off I need a good lens or two to do a decent job with a decent flash, my problem is not drunks or getting people into the right position,is getting the equipment required to complete this assignment and build a portfolio, I think there must be some decent lenses about that are fairly old but still good enough to do wedding photography, and this is where i need the help and support. sorry for the confusion and thank upo for your comments.
04-07-2012, 08:11 AM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by madaway Quote
Hi i think i have confused a few people, about the fee, this is totally free of charge, as it is for my Neice who is getting married on a budget. So to start off I need a good lens or two to do a decent job with a decent flash, my problem is not drunks or getting people into the right position,is getting the equipment required to complete this assignment and build a portfolio, I think there must be some decent lenses about that are fairly old but still good enough to do wedding photography, and this is where i need the help and support. sorry for the confusion and thank upo for your comments.
Ah... I thought you were wanting to take the leap into being a pro wedding shooter. I'm not a pro wedding photographer, but I've been around a bunch of them. I think you'd be fine with your K-r, the 18-55, 55-300, (the 18-250 would be the best do-it-all lens) and at least one good bounce flash. (an extra one on a stand as a wireless slave would be even better.) I'd first experiment with bouncing the flash with a human subject to learn what works best for people shots.

If possible, I'd go scout the locations first with your camera to get an idea ahead of time what kind of lighting they'll have so you'll have an idea what ISO to use, etc. before the day of the event. If you have someone to go with you to use as a model to do a few test shots with the flash in the actual location, even better.

People might tell you that you need to spend a ton of money on fancy lenses for a wedding. You don't. As long as you have focal lengths covered with decent lenses from 18-250-ish, you're good to go for lenses. the Pentax kit lenses are plenty good enough, IMO. Most of the wedding photogs I know use mostly an all-purpose zoom & bounce flash or two.

Just remember to take plenty of extra freshly charged batteries.
04-07-2012, 10:11 AM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by madaway Quote
Hi i think i have confused a few people, about the fee, this is totally free of charge, as it is for my Neice who is getting married on a budget. So to start off I need a good lens or two to do a decent job with a decent flash, my problem is not drunks or getting people into the right position,is getting the equipment required to complete this assignment and build a portfolio, I think there must be some decent lenses about that are fairly old but still good enough to do wedding photography, and this is where i need the help and support. sorry for the confusion and thank upo for your comments.
Ah, that makes it a little different. As Gibby said, kit lenses would mostly do you ok, but I would suggest getting a flash. A Pentax flash would be more costly but will probably have TTL (automatic metering), or perhaps a Metz, or if you want cheap and cheerfull (but fully manual) look into the Yongnuo flashes from ebay. Also grab a cheapo plastic diffuser to go on it to help smooth out edges.

If you are looking to get some smooth shallow depth of field shots, either use your telephoto at max zoom or look for a 50mm f1.8 / 1.4 etc, older manual focus versions can be had for very little, or splash out on an FA / DA series lens if you have the extra cash.

Just makes sure that your niece is aware that you probably won't be getting the shots that a pro would be. At the end of the day you don't want to have a falling out over it. You might also want to consider looking to see if anyone else in your family/friends is also a photographer and would be willing to shoot it with you. Also, if by the time you price up any kit that you were going to buy for this, you find that it's quite a lot - instead see if you could get a local wedding 'tog in your area to shoot a half day/couple of hours, even if it means a bunch of family members chipping in here and there. The photographs are going to be what reminds the bride and groom of this 'once in a lifetime' event, and they are going to be with them for ever, however much people say they're on a budget, there is always somewhere to get that little bit of money from.
04-07-2012, 12:50 PM   #12
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To add to that, with a decent flash that can bounce and swivel, you'll get more pleasing results with a fast prime to add to your kit lenses - something like an FA 50 f/1.4 is preferable but a DA 35 f/2.4 might do also if you can get closer to the action. If manual focusing is a consideration, you can get very good results for much cheaper with an old Takumar 55/1.8 or Pentax M or A 50 f/1.4. All the best for that.
04-07-2012, 02:47 PM   #13
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;Thanks to you all for your advice.
04-07-2012, 02:56 PM   #14
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was interested in the comment the 18 - 250 would do it all please explain?
04-07-2012, 03:02 PM   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by madaway Quote
was interested in the comment the 18 - 250 would do it all please explain?
It handles everything from wide angle to moderately long tele. You probably wouldn't need to change lenses if you had one. It's also reportedly an excellent lens.

Cheers,
Bobbo :-)
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