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Little Bighorn Battlefield
Lens: Various Camera:Photo Location: SE Montana 
Posted By: SpecialK, 07-16-2011, 11:54 AM

The Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument is where Gen. Custer and his men died in the famous "last stand" against Native Americans in 1876.

This is part of the modern Native American monument. It's much nicer-looking than the outside of the museum.


Museum exhibits.


























You can take a bus tour.


Monument at the Reno-Benteen battlefield section on the eastern edge of the park.


There is a self-guided walking tour of the area.


Custer's scouts at Crow's Nest in the distance spotted the Indian village on the river to the right of this location.


After the initial attack on the village, Custer's ranking officer, Col. Reno, retreated across the Little Bighorn river to this bluff and set up a defensive position. White markers denote where US cavalrymen fell, and the reddish-brown markers are locations of Indian deaths. No one is actually buried at the markers.






There are some semi-tame wild horses in the area. A honking tour bus easing through herd on the road has little scattering effect...












On the self-guided tour. Stop 2 is the location where Capt French brought reinforcements in the morning.


There was only one field hospital, which was set up in this depression.

"Corporal Lell was fatally wounded in the abdomen and dragged to the hospital. He was dying and knew it. 'Lift me up, boys,' he said to some of the men. 'I want to see the boys again before I go.' So they held him up in a sitting position where he could see his comrades in action...then they laid him down and he died soon after...I will never forget Corporal Lell." - Pvt Charles Windolph.


Hard to see, but defensive trenches like this were hastily dug and surrounded by dead horses and mules to aid in protection.


Indian riflemen fired from the ridges.


Reno's men ran out of water, so volunteers went down to the river to get some.

"The excitement and heat made our thirst almost maddening. The men were forbidden to use tobacco. They put pebbles in their mouths to try to excite the glands, some ate grass roots, but did not find relief; some tried to eat hard bread, but after chewing it awhile would blow it out of their mouths like so much flour." - Pvt Edward Godfrey.


Markers for two Cavalry privates.


Jones...


and Meador.


Sioux warrior Long Road was killed in an early-morning attack.


The depression shown here was the location of Company A.


Remains were found here.


Supposed to be more rifle pits here.


Indian sharpshooters were on the ridge in the distance.


Vincent Farrier marker.


Moving westerly...Weir Point.




Trees across the road.




Medicine Tail coulee.




Medicine Tail ford.




Deep coulee.




Indian encampment.




Greasy Grass ridge.




Lame White Man charge.


Cavalry markers.




Calhoun Hill.




Cavalry markers.


Capt Calhoun marker.


Horse cemetery.




Indian markers near "last stand" hill.


Wooden Leg hill.




Last Stand hill.


These are markers, not graves.


End of the line.


Gen Custer had 3 relatives who died in the battle as well.


Last Stand monument to cavalry.


Markers.


The Indian monument consists mostly of plaques on a circular wall.


Peace through Unity.


The Custer national cemetery include members from the battle, and other military personnel. The rest of Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer's command killed in action here in 1876 were buried where they fell, and later moved here. Most of the officer's including Custer were transferred to Eastern cemeteries in 1877. Custer is buried at the West Point Military Academy Cemetery.




Custer's scouts...Curly.


...Goes Ahead.


...White Man Runs Him.


Reno survived the battle, and later was tried for cowardice in action here, and later drunkeness on duty, which caused him to be discharged from service.


After a wildfire cleared the ground in 1983, a massive archeological dig was conducted which recovered many artifacts, and the volume of bullets recovered allowed tracking individual weapons over the battlefield.


Last edited by SpecialK; 07-21-2011 at 07:51 PM.
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07-16-2011, 01:33 PM   #2
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I guess they didn't mention that Custer had left Reno and circled around the back of the camp... attempting to kill the women and children. The Sioux knew he was going to do this because he'd done it so many times before. It also isn't mentioned many Sioux thought of him as a coward because he killed mainly non-combatants and shied away from battles with the warriors. Revisionist history, is always so lame. One guy's martyred hero is another man's war criminal, such is the nature of war.
07-16-2011, 02:07 PM   #3
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QuoteQuote:
I guess they didn't mention that Custer had left Reno and circled around the back of the camp...
Nope, they didn't, though it would not totally surprise me. The Native American tour guide had his chance.

Last edited by SpecialK; 07-16-2011 at 02:38 PM.
07-16-2011, 02:10 PM   #4
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They didn't when I was there 20 years ago either... oh well, no use fighting old wars.

07-16-2011, 02:30 PM   #5
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Very very nice historical reference especially informative to those outside of the good ol' USA who may not be familiar with that period of history.How long did it take from start to finish to post everything?It looks like a lot of work.BTW--thanks for the "spacing" of photos info.--charliezap
07-16-2011, 02:35 PM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by charliezap Quote
Very very nice historical reference especially informative to those outside of the good ol' USA who may not be familiar with that period of history.How long did it take from start to finish to post everything?It looks like a lot of work.BTW--thanks for the "spacing" of photos info.--charliezap
Hi Charlie:

This one took a fair amount of time - a few hours - because I had two sets of photos (bus tour, and on my own) that I had to blend into the right chronological sequence, more or less, plus do a little fact-checking along the way. It's fun, though.
07-16-2011, 03:15 PM   #7
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Great photos and information. A park ranger explained the history of the area to us and was very knowledgeable. Interesting area to visit. Bob

07-20-2011, 06:01 PM   #8
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I just got a book through Amazon the other day, entitled Archeological Perspectives on the Battle of Little Bighorn, based on the findings of the dig there after the wildfire of 1983.

It is heavy on grid locations and diagrams and lists of artifacts and maps of finds, such as those showing the concentrations of Indian bullet casings (on the peripheral hills around the defensive Cavalry) and the actual Indian bullets concentrated not coincidentally, in the Cavalry locations, since that is where they were aiming.

By tracing the individual rifles and pistols made possible by studying the bullet markings, they have a pretty good idea of the flow of the battle.

But, I have to finish the James Doolittle bio first.
07-20-2011, 09:21 PM   #9
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Nice photos. It sure has been built up since I was there. There weren't even any fences or anything. You could walk right among the graves
07-20-2011, 09:54 PM   #10
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Great Series... So much history... Thanks for sharing your trip!
07-21-2011, 08:03 PM   #11
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QuoteQuote:
It sure has been built up since I was there. There weren't even any fences or anything. You could walk right among the graves
Good thing they put up the fences or eventually it would be ruined.

QuoteQuote:
Great Series... So much history... Thanks for sharing your trip!
I'm glad you liked it - I sure did.
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