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Lens: 100mm macro Camera: K3 Photo Location: Australia 
Posted By: makkeroni, 02-25-2014, 03:18 AM

This is a 'Red Belly Black Snake' and it's venomous. They are quite common in my garden.

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02-25-2014, 03:33 AM   #2
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Note to self, watch where you put your foot down in the garden, oh it's OK I'm not "down under"

Hmm... we're very lucky here, we don't many things running around here that can do any serious harm.
02-25-2014, 03:40 AM   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by Kerrowdown Quote
Note to self, watch where you put your foot down in the garden, oh it's OK I'm not "down under"

Hmm... we're very lucky here, we don't many things running around here that can do any serious harm.
You should see our 'King Browns', 'Tiger' snakes or 'Taipans'. You won't see me taking shots from them, surely.
02-25-2014, 03:45 AM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by makkeroni Quote
You won't see me taking shots from them, surely
Maybe with a 3000 mm lens... eh.

02-25-2014, 05:36 AM   #5
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Note to Kerrowdown. No need to be nervous. These (and other species in the black snake family) usually flatten their necks (a bit like a cobra) when they are a bit ticked off and inclined to strike. So you usually get some warning. But the black snake family are all hemotoxic - the venom breaks down blood vessels and causes extreme coagulation of the blood. The venom moves through the lymph system and you have a good chance of surviving the bite if a pressure bandage is applied to stop the flow. The black snake family rarely cause death although the King Brown (which is a member of the black snake family) is a very large snake and I would prefer not to find out how venomous it is (one lives under my woolshed). The true brown snakes, on the other hand are neurotoxic and they are bad news. A bite can be fatal within minutes. They are also very nervy and inclined to be aggressive. They rear up in an "S" shape and tend to strike fairly high. Death adder venom is both hemotoxic and neurotoxic which is very bad news but because they strike at low level, good boots are usually enough protection. So come on down. You don't know what you are missing!
02-25-2014, 08:49 AM   #6
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They just don't make a lens long enough and I like snakes.
02-25-2014, 09:01 AM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by makkeroni Quote
You should see our 'King Browns', 'Tiger' snakes or 'Taipans'. You won't see me taking shots from them, surely.


QuoteOriginally posted by PJ1 Quote
Note to Kerrowdown. No need to be nervous. These (and other species in the black snake family) usually flatten their necks (a bit like a cobra) when they are a bit ticked off and inclined to strike. So you usually get some warning. But the black snake family are all hemotoxic - the venom breaks down blood vessels and causes extreme coagulation of the blood. The venom moves through the lymph system and you have a good chance of surviving the bite if a pressure bandage is applied to stop the flow. The black snake family rarely cause death although the King Brown (which is a member of the black snake family) is a very large snake and I would prefer not to find out how venomous it is (one lives under my woolshed). The true brown snakes, on the other hand are neurotoxic and they are bad news. A bite can be fatal within minutes. They are also very nervy and inclined to be aggressive. They rear up in an "S" shape and tend to strike fairly high. Death adder venom is both hemotoxic and neurotoxic which is very bad news but because they strike at low level, good boots are usually enough protection. So come on down. You don't know what you are missing!
From TV shows and photos I've seen, Australia is a beautiful country. However, I've also seen several TV shows with names like "Australia's Deadliest Dozen" or "The Ten Most Venomous Snakes in Australia". One of those had video coverage of a man who'd been bitten eight times by an angry Taipan. I'm not sure how much those shows were sensationalized, but I guess those who live there know the proper precautions to take. Question: I like to take long hikes deep in the forest. Is that type of activity possible down there? I don't mean to sound ignorant, I'm just curious

Last edited by TonyTurley; 02-25-2014 at 09:20 AM. Reason: grammar
02-25-2014, 09:16 AM   #8
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Aghh

QuoteOriginally posted by PJ1 Quote
Note to Kerrowdown. No need to be nervous. These (and other species in the black snake family) usually flatten their necks (a bit like a cobra) when they are a bit ticked off and inclined to strike. So you usually get some warning. But the black snake family are all hemotoxic - the venom breaks down blood vessels and causes extreme coagulation of the blood. The venom moves through the lymph system and you have a good chance of surviving the bite if a pressure bandage is applied to stop the flow. The black snake family rarely cause death although the King Brown (which is a member of the black snake family) is a very large snake and I would prefer not to find out how venomous it is (one lives under my woolshed). The true brown snakes, on the other hand are neurotoxic and they are bad news. A bite can be fatal within minutes. They are also very nervy and inclined to be aggressive. They rear up in an "S" shape and tend to strike fairly high. Death adder venom is both hemotoxic and neurotoxic which is very bad news but because they strike at low level, good boots are usually enough protection. So come on down. You don't know what you are missing!
Now that I read that I can see the snake is coiled like that, I bet they can strike out pretty far, makes me almost happy with copperheads..... Almost.

02-25-2014, 09:22 AM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by sherrvonne Quote
. . . makes me almost happy with copperheads..... Almost.
LOL. We also have Timber Rattlers . . . nothing anywhere near what the Aussies or our neighbors in the desert SW have. Thankfully.
02-25-2014, 09:26 AM   #10
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So, you used a 100mm lens? And I'm afraid it might jump out of my PC screen! Beautiful beast, nevertheless. (Not to mention this one seems to be much more honest than some similar creatures with human faces )
02-25-2014, 03:52 PM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by TonyTurley Quote


From TV shows and photos I've seen, Australia is a beautiful country. However, I've also seen several TV shows with names like "Australia's Deadliest Dozen" or "The Ten Most Venomous Snakes in Australia". One of those had video coverage of a man who'd been bitten eight times by an angry Taipan. I'm not sure how much those shows were sensationalized, but I guess those who live there know the proper precautions to take. Question: I like to take long hikes deep in the forest. Is that type of activity possible down there? I don't mean to sound ignorant, I'm just curious
Long hikes in the bush are no problem. Snakes generally keep out of the way. The loud (to them) vibrations of someone walking is a signal to move away from a large animal. Long pants (such as jeans) are a good protection from bites. I have never (in 60+ years) been in danger of being bitten. I stepped on a red-bellied black when I was a kid - it was under some weed when I was fishing. That was the biggest fright I have had, although finding a small non-venomous spotted python in my dingo trap box gave me a bit of a lift!
Very few people get bitten but it is good to carry a pressure bandage as insurance. I have one in my Suzuki when working around my property and generally carry one when out walking.
02-25-2014, 04:24 PM   #12
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Good to know y'all's snakes get out of the way, the copperhead does not, it is an obstinate thing. Quote from local park ranger..."look for them, they don't move away, they stay where they are...." They are easy to step on or disturb, they lay on your steps, get in the dog water dishes, flower beds, and every dog I ever had has been bitten by one. Their color camouflages perfectly with dead pine needles. Learned to keep shovels around.
02-25-2014, 07:02 PM   #13
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Thanks for that info, PJ1. As sherrvonne said, we have mostly Copperheads. There is no documented record of someone dying from a Copperhead bite in my state, but their bite will sure make you feel like it. I've never been bitten by one, but some who have said it was just a tiny prick, like jabbing your skin on a thorn. What followed was the really nasty part. I'm in the woods a lot, and hope I never have to find out.
07-03-2018, 11:33 AM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by makkeroni Quote
This is a 'Red Belly Black Snake' and it's venomous. They are quite common in my garden.
Must be Australia. Nice catch.
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