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New at Macro Photography
Lens: DFA 100mm WR Macro Camera: k5 Photo Location: Bronx, NY ISO: 400 Shutter Speed: 1/80s Aperture: F16 
Posted By: Jedi_Strings, 09-18-2015, 09:45 PM

Hey there everyone,

So I took these shot a few weeks back & these are among the first shots I took of insects/live macro subjects. I actually bought the DFA 100mm for occasions like these. I shot these pictures without a tripod (I was walking with my kit, saw the bees & got to shooting). As I started to walk away from the bees I saw the dragonfly flying by the chips & got a quick shot in before it left. I was hoping for feedback on these shots & if possible some general tips for macro photography.

Last edited by Jedi_Strings; 12-23-2015 at 07:20 PM.
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09-19-2015, 07:20 AM   #2
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I'd say you did quite well. If I could possibly give you any advice, it would be to shoot dozens and dozens of shots of the bees and insects. I'd also try different apertures until you discover the one that gives you the best DOF and yet provides a pleasing, OOF background. You've got a good lens and camera for your adventures. As a passing thought, you might also consider a monopod. I find that it has improved my sharpness a great deal.... but, I'm old and shakey!

For what it's worth, I never use auto focus when photographing insects. I pre-focus at a pre-determined distance, then move the camera back and forth until the subject comes into focus and click away, all the while, moving in and out, back and forth. Kinda' the old "spray and pray" approach. Just my .02.
09-19-2015, 09:14 AM   #3
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I agree with Dewman.
09-19-2015, 09:48 AM   #4
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Sounds like you had a nice insect safari. Macro is great fun. Nice first shots there.

09-19-2015, 10:09 AM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by Dewman Quote
I'd say you did quite well. If I could possibly give you any advice, it would be to shoot dozens and dozens of shots of the bees and insects. I'd also try different apertures until you discover the one that gives you the best DOF and yet provides a pleasing, OOF background. You've got a good lens and camera for your adventures. As a passing thought, you might also consider a monopod. I find that it has improved my sharpness a great deal.... but, I'm old and shakey!

For what it's worth, I never use auto focus when photographing insects. I pre-focus at a pre-determined distance, then move the camera back and forth until the subject comes into focus and click away, all the while, moving in and out, back and forth. Kinda' the old "spray and pray" approach. Just my .02.
Thank you for your advice! I think I'll try a monopod like you suggested because I did notice that I would have been better off focusing manually.
09-20-2015, 10:06 AM - 1 Like   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by Jedi_Strings Quote
Thank you for your advice! I think I'll try a monopod like you suggested because I did notice that I would have been better off focusing manually.
If you aren't aware already there's a Pentax Macro Club and forum where you can visit all the cool macro shots and discussions there too.
09-20-2015, 06:33 PM - 1 Like   #7
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Agree with all previous comments. If I may add something, always consider your background. Often with flowers and insects, the background can become a confusing mass of leaves and sticks. Select your angle to minimise these distractions or takes advantage of depth of field to blur them out. Do not be afraid to crop either. Sometimes you cannot remove an annoying twig from the frame and maintain the composition you want.
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