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Fall "Bugs"
Lens: FA 50 macro, FA 100 macro, Adaptall 90 (plus 2X TC) Camera: K-5 Photo Location: East Tennessee 
Posted By: mole, 11-03-2016, 06:12 PM

It's been a great autumn for many of our native insects. Here are a few samples from here at the home park and nearby.

Will start with a "bug" who isn't an insect - a Golden Garden Spider. Folks here often call them "writing spiders," because of the zig-zags in the web. Old story was, if you find your name written in a writing spider's web, you are going to die that day! There must be a lot of insects who are named "ZZZZZ!"





Not sure of the species of spider, but he sure has a nice mouthful of Great Spreadwing! Great Spreadwings are among our last damselflies of the season.





And Shadow Darners and Meadow Hawks are among our last dragonflies of the season.







Here's another autumnal insect predator. This is the more common, but non-native mantis - the Praying Mantis.





And now for an assortment of butterflies… Here's a Pipevine Swallowtail caterpillar on its host plant (Dutchman's Pipevine) up at Flint Rock, and an adult Pipevine Swallowtail butterfly enjoying some manure at Hampton Creek Cove.







Here's one of the butterflies that mimic Pipevine Swallowtails. Spicebush Swallowtails look a lot like their cousins, but lack the toxic properties.





And here's another pipevine mimic - some female Tiger Swallowtails look like pipevines, but again, are not toxic.





This is a more typical color pattern for the Tiger Swallowtails. This one is working on some late-season Swamp Milkweed.





Swamp Milkweed is also a favorite of Silvery Checkerspots.





Now two species of Sulphur Butterflies - a Sleepy Orange at the home park...





…and a Cloudless Sulphur at Holston Mountain.





Hot humid early autumn days are best for finding Hackberry Emperors. These butterflies don't go for nectar, they prefer our sweat!





Butterflyweed nectar is very attractive to this butterflies that do enjoy nectar. Butterflyweed also blooms later in the season than most other milkweed species. Here's a Gray Hairstreak enjoying butterflyweed…





A skipper (not sure which species) also working the butteflyweed…





And an Eastern Tailed Blue, also working the butterflyweed blooms.





Here's another Eastern Tailed Blue shot. You can see the little "tails" that mimic antennas at the "wrong end" of these tiny butterflies - to direct predator attacks to the wrong end of the butterfly! Can you see anything else at that "wrong end?" Note that he was feeding on some Mink droppings!





Here's a Variegated Fritillary nectaring at butterflyweed.





And another Variegated Fritillary working some late-season white asters.





This tiny Checkered Skipper was also enjoying the asters. There are several species of Checkered Skipper, but it's impossible to tell them apart without microscopic examination!





Just in case you are already tired of butterflies, how about a just-emerged Cicada? This one was coming out about a month later than usual - perhaps the very dry season made the ground harder?





Why did the Pandorus Sphinx Moth caterpillar cross the road? To look for a good place to make his cocoon on the other side!




Hope you enjoyed this little ramble through "bug" country. Thanks in advance for any comments or suggestions!
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11-03-2016, 08:11 PM   #2
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A very nice collection. Well framed and exquisite detail
11-03-2016, 08:32 PM   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by Bruce Clark Quote
A very nice collection. Well framed and exquisite detail
Torally agree..............
11-04-2016, 12:46 PM   #4
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And an Eastern Tailed Blue, also working the butterflyweed blooms.

Read more at: https://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/12-post-your-photos/333168-nature-fall-bu...#ixzz4P4TIQ4g3

With some tiny lassioglossum (I'm fairly sure) bees lurking below.

Great set.

11-04-2016, 02:30 PM   #5
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Great set and comments!
11-04-2016, 02:57 PM   #6
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Wonderful set -thanks for sharing
11-04-2016, 05:04 PM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by Bruce Clark Quote
A very nice collection. Well framed and exquisite detail
Thanks for your kind words!


QuoteOriginally posted by eaglem Quote
Torally agree..............
Thanks!


QuoteOriginally posted by TER-OR Quote
And an Eastern Tailed Blue, also working the butterflyweed blooms....

With some tiny lassioglossum (I'm fairly sure) bees lurking below.

Great set.
Will defer to your superior knowledge of hymenopterous species!


QuoteOriginally posted by Jacquot Quote
Great set and comments!
So glad you enjoyed them!

QuoteOriginally posted by markvc Quote
Wonderful set -thanks for sharing
And thanks for taking time to comment!

11-06-2016, 01:24 AM   #8
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What a great set!!
11-06-2016, 06:45 PM   #9
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Glad you enjoyed the "little critters!"
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